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The Changing World of Villians

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  • The Changing World of Villians

    I got to thinking that I can tell what decade a film was made by who the official villains were, the Russians during the Cold War, then the Chinese, then Islamic radicals and most recently South American cartels. But that only holds true for Hollywood - who are the official villains for foreign film makers?

    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

  • #2
    In Japanese anime and manga they are typically, monsters, demons, aliens, or rich corporate types / trolls.

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    • #3
      I think the movie "villain" in itself is a US archetype, at least we know here that a movie or game is made in the US when it has a typical villain in it
      Last edited by Snowygerry; 01 Jun 18, 04:48.
      High Admiral Snowy, Commander In Chief of the Naval Forces of The Phoenix Confederation.

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      • #4
        Wasn't there a period Hollywood went through where every baddy had to be an Englishman with an upper class accent that could cut glass?
        I think Alan Rickman started it in Robin Hood...

        "Cancel Christmas!"

        The long toll of the brave
        Is not lost in darkness
        Over the fruitful earth
        And athwart the seas
        Hath passed the light of noble deeds
        Unquenchable forever.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
          Wasn't there a period Hollywood went through where every baddy had to be an Englishman with an upper class accent that could cut glass?
          I think Alan Rickman started it in Robin Hood...

          "Cancel Christmas!"

          Although he could also play sardonic German villains - eg Hans Gruber in Die Hard
          Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
          Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
            Wasn't there a period Hollywood went through where every baddy had to be an Englishman with an upper class accent that could cut glass?
            I think Alan Rickman started it in Robin Hood...

            "Cancel Christmas!"

            Hollywood villains almost always speak proper English, with or without accent. The hero is the one that has a 6th grade vocabulary and problems making full sentences...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post

              Hollywood villains almost always speak proper English, with or without accent. The hero is the one that has a 6th grade vocabulary and problems making full sentences...
              Maybe so the common movie-goer can relate to him (her)? They don't relate to me, I prefer the clever heroes that are better than the villains. And I also prefer villains that aren't just "misunderstood" good-people. Though if the actor is good, I'll accept any villains that entertains me.
              The First Amendment applies to SMS, Emails, Blogs, online news, the Fourth applies to your cell phone, computer, and your car, but the Second only applies to muskets?

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              • #8
                One other thing about Japanese manga and anime villains is that they aren't usually just evil. They often have a different and conflicting agenda with the "good guys." That means it gives them more complexity and dimensions than their Hollywood counterparts.

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                • #9
                  So who are the villains in foreign made films?
                  Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                    So who are the villains in foreign made films?
                    On the occasions that the villain isn't local, more often than not they are American.
                    "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Surrey View Post

                      On the occasions that the villain isn't local, more often than not they are American.
                      Hardly surprising.
                      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                        So who are the villains in foreign made films?
                        Watching old Kung-Fu movies the villains are usually the Manchu. Damned, dastardly Manchu.
                        The First Amendment applies to SMS, Emails, Blogs, online news, the Fourth applies to your cell phone, computer, and your car, but the Second only applies to muskets?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Hida Akechi View Post

                          Watching old Kung-Fu movies the villains are usually the Manchu. Damned, dastardly Manchu.
                          One of Bruce Lee's villains was Chuck Norris. Another one was Kareem Jabar.

                          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

                            One of Bruce Lee's villains was Chuck Norris. Another one was Kareem Jabar.
                            Did you know that Chuck Norris started out as a SP?

                            https://www.military.com/veteran-job...ck-norris.html

                            Yeah. USAF.
                            Credo quia absurdum.


                            Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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                            • #15
                              I would say that TV has surpassed film in terms of future potential and growth. The length allows for more experimentation and more character development.

                              Film is comparably risk adverse and formulaic sort of business.
                              Zhitomir-Berdichev, West of Kiev: 24 Dec 1943-31 Jan 1944
                              Stalin's Favorite: The Combat History of the 2nd Guards Tank Army
                              Barbarossa Derailed I & II
                              Battle of Kalinin October 1941

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