Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Terror

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Terror

    I just finished watching the final episode of The Terror, the outstanding series based on the loss of the both ships and theirs crews during a failed Arctic expedition to find the Northwest Passage undertaken aboard Terror and Erebus.

    Brilliantly done, as with most British historical series, with savage plot twists and a surprising ending.
    Last edited by Mountain Man; 29 May 18, 17:51. Reason: spelling, due to really small letters.
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

  • #2
    I watched it. I have to give AMC credit for resisting the urge to make Chris Hardwick talk about every episode.

    I was mulling over a technical detail. The skipper said they had provisions for "three years...five with strict rationing". I was wondering if a ship that size could actually hold that level pf provisions - especially since those ships were hybrids and the boiler room alone looked like it took up a chunk of space, to say nothing about coal. Even with canning technology that seemed to be pushing it.
    A new life awaits you in the off world colonies; the chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Pirateship1982 View Post
      I watched it. I have to give AMC credit for resisting the urge to make Chris Hardwick talk about every episode.

      I was mulling over a technical detail. The skipper said they had provisions for "three years...five with strict rationing". I was wondering if a ship that size could actually hold that level pf provisions - especially since those ships were hybrids and the boiler room alone looked like it took up a chunk of space, to say nothing about coal. Even with canning technology that seemed to be pushing it.
      I wondered the same thing myself.
      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Pirateship1982 View Post
        I watched it. I have to give AMC credit for resisting the urge to make Chris Hardwick talk about every episode.

        I was mulling over a technical detail. The skipper said they had provisions for "three years...five with strict rationing". I was wondering if a ship that size could actually hold that level pf provisions - especially since those ships were hybrids and the boiler room alone looked like it took up a chunk of space, to say nothing about coal. Even with canning technology that seemed to be pushing it.
        It was probably the canning technology that did for them. The early process used cans soldered with lead which leached into the food. There is evidence that the crew ended up suffering from lead poisoning which amongst other things would lead to irrational decisions being made.

        A large part of the provisions were dehydrated foods (dried beans, peas etc) which when dry took up much less room.

        The engines were intended for auxiliary power when there was insufficient wind (or it was from the wrong quarter) but the ship still needed to move.and they would not be used that much so that the provision for fuel was limited. Initially the RN was deeply suspicious of steam power and regarded it as unreliable and likely to break down at crucial moments (which in the early days it was) and thought of it mainly as a means of getting in and out of anchorages without needing a tug. A bigger issue than coal was water as there were no condensers.
        Last edited by MarkV; 03 Jun 18, 11:39.
        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MarkV View Post

          It was probably the canning technology that did for them. The early process used cans soldered with lead which leached into the food. There is evidence that the crew ended up suffering from lead poisoning which amongst other things would lead to irrational decisions being made.

          A large part of the provisions were dehydrated foods (dried beans, peas etc) which when dry took up much less room.

          The engines were intended for auxiliary power when there was insufficient wind (or it was from the wrong quarter) but the ship still needed to move.and they would not be used that much so that the provision for fuel was limited. Initially the RN was deeply suspicious of steam power and regarded it as unreliable and likely to break down at crucial moments (which in the early days it was) and thought of it mainly as a means of getting in and out of anchorages without needing a tug. A bigger issue than coal was water as there were no condensers.
          With all that ice and the boiler available, they didn't need condensers. They could melt whatever they needed. These guys weren't delicate wallflowers like the people we have today. They didn't have any idea what "risk avoidance" behavior was all about. They just thought of it and then did it.
          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
            I just finished watching the final episode of The Terror, the outstanding series based on the loss of the both ships and theirs crews during a failed Arctic expedition to find the Northwest Passage undertaken aboard Terror and Erebus.

            Brilliantly done, as with most British historical series, with savage plot twists and a surprising ending.
            Agreed! It's amazing what can be produced on a Hungarian sound stage and CGI.

            Incidentally, the health degradation due to lead poisoning from lead soldered cans theory has been discredited some over the past few years. Apparently lead levels were accumulated gradually over time by living in high lead Britain, analysis shows there's no spike due to the consumption of lead laced food over some 2 years or so before death.


            In 1981, a team of scientists led by Owen Beattie, a professor of anthropology at the University of Alberta, began a series of scientific studies of the graves, bodies, and other physical evidence left by Franklin's men on Beechey Island and King William Island. They concluded that the men buried on Beechey Island most likely died of pneumonia and perhaps tuberculosis, and that lead poisoning may have worsened their health, owing to badly soldered cans held in the ships' food stores. It was later suggested that the source of this lead may not have been tinned food, but the distilled water systems fitted to the ships. However, studies in 2013 and 2016 suggested that lead poisoning was likely not a factor, and that the crew's ill health may in fact have been due to malnutrition, specifically zinc deficiency, possibly due to a lack of meat in their diet.
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankl...ost_expedition


            Fingernail absolves lead poisoning in death of Arctic explorer
            Analysis of nail points to zinc deficiency as culprit in 170-year-old mystery.

            ... "The lead theory is pretty much dismantled by this point", says Ron Martin, an analytical chemist at Western University in London, Canada. In 2013, he analysed bone fragments from several crewmembers including Hartnell, and concluded that they had experienced consistent lead exposure throughout their lives, with no spike during the expedition.

            Further evidence pointing away from lead poisoning comes from the expedition's two ships, the HMS Erebus and the HMS Terror, which sank about 100 kilometres apart. Archaeologists with Parks Canada located the two ships in 2014 and 2016 respectively, after years of searching. Exploration of the Terror showed that items had been carefully stowed away, arguing that the crew had not been experiencing the hallucinations or delirium that often come with lead exposure, says Millar...
            https://www.nature.com/news/fingerna...plorer-1.21128
            "I am Groot"
            - Groot

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Marmat View Post

              Agreed! It's amazing what can be produced on a Hungarian sound stage and CGI.

              Incidentally, the health degradation due to lead poisoning from lead soldered cans theory has been discredited some over the past few years. Apparently lead levels were accumulated gradually over time by living in high lead Britain, analysis shows there's no spike due to the consumption of lead laced food over some 2 years or so before death.




              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankl...ost_expedition


              Fingernail absolves lead poisoning in death of Arctic explorer
              Analysis of nail points to zinc deficiency as culprit in 170-year-old mystery.



              https://www.nature.com/news/fingerna...plorer-1.21128
              No Britain was not high lead, ancient Rome was as it was used in cooking utensils but not 19th century Britain
              Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
              Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

                With all that ice and the boiler available, they didn't need condensers. They could melt whatever they needed. These guys weren't delicate wallflowers like the people we have today. They didn't have any idea what "risk avoidance" behavior was all about. They just thought of it and then did it.
                Not an effective way of proceeding. Fresh water is needed for steam engines (salt really mucks them up) and having your crew over the side trying to break up ice to feed the boileris a somewhat ludicrous scenario

                They just thought of it and then did it. and then they died - often the case in those times
                Last edited by MarkV; 03 Jun 18, 17:32.
                Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MarkV View Post

                  No Britain was not high lead, ancient Rome was as it was used in cooking utensils but not 19th century Britain
                  Industrial Revolution Britain was indeed high lead. Britain was the world's foremost producer and exporter of lead for industrial purposes i.e. plumbing, paint etc., and would remain so until the mid-19th century.

                  "A great share of the demand for lead came from plumbing and painting, lead paints were in regular use. At this time, more (working class) people were exposed to the metal and lead poisoning cases escalated. This led to research into the effects of lead intake. Lead was proven to be more dangerous in its fume form than as a solid metal. Lead poisoning and gout were linked; British physician Alfred Baring Garrod noted a third of his gout patients were plumbers and painters. The effects of chronic ingestion of lead, including mental disorders, were also studied in the 19th century. The first laws aimed at decreasing lead poisoning in factories were enacted during the 1870s and 1880s in the United Kingdom."

                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead#I...ial_Revolution

                  The crews of Erebus and Terror embarked upon Franklin's expedition with pre-existing high levels of lead, it just didn't kill them
                  "I am Groot"
                  - Groot

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Having spent a fare amount of time in the Artic with the Canadian Forces I can relate as to how these men might feel and then again we never got left behind or lost for 3 years and as for polar bears...there are some real big bad mothers up there...........remember the joke we had ran........What is it I do now ,,shoot the eskimo and f#### the bear or was it the other way round???....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Here you go!
                       
                      ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                      All human ills he can subdue,
                      Or with a bauble or medal
                      Can win mans heart for you;
                      And many a blessing know to stew
                      To make a megloamaniac bright;
                      Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                      The Pixie is a little shite.

                      Comment

                      Latest Topics

                      Collapse

                      Working...
                      X