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Film and literature villains

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  • Film and literature villains

    There is one author (Terry Goodkind) that has so got a style of writing, that his villains actually get me entirely worked up. I find, as I read, I get so angry at the villain, that it actually makes me to worked up to read. I find myself actually forced to put the book down, cool off, and go back to it.

    That's power. That an author can write so well, he can expertly push the reader's buttons.

    Because, it's not enough to just write a good sounding story, the author must actually be a damn good writer in order to get the effect.

    I am currently watching Battlestar Galactica, and have made it to the 18th show of season 2. There's 20 that I know of.
    I have found, that the Baltar in this series, so completely, and utterly out performs the man of the original show, that the original Baltar comes off looking like a pathetic moron that can never do anything right.
    The man is the pawn of a woman that is inside his head. He's got so many personality flaws, it's just incredible. He has redefined the whole concept of chaotic evil.

    My hat's off to the writers of the show, they have so completely made me despise the man. He's a seedy pervert, a craven coward, a weak minded spineless little worm. And he's a dangerously educated scientist, that has the attention of so many gullible humans.

    I can't even think of a show where I've hated a character in it so much.
    Life is change. Built models for decades.
    Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
    I didn't for a long time either.

  • #2
    I have the entire WEB Griffin series called Marines. That is a powerful series of books. Takes the life of a young 2nd LT and his girlfriend and soon to be wife.
    Govenour Of Texas and all southern provinces. Kepper Of The Holy Woodchipper.

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    • #3
      If you want a good set of villains, try the first three Sharpe books. Sgt Hakeswill is a guy I keep wanting to strangle all through the text. Don't want to spoil it for those who haven't read, but you're furious that he's still alive (at least I was.)

      The other villains that Cornwell concocted are about the same way. I kept wanting to go to the end and see how he dies, because for me, he just had to.
      "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing" - attributed to Edmund Burke

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Saint Jeremy
        I have the entire WEB Griffin series called Marines. That is a powerful series of books. Takes the life of a young 2nd LT and his girlfriend and soon to be wife.
        I know of a lot of WEB Griffin's later works, But I only have his Brotherhood of War series (he wrote them years ago). They follow a cast of characters through the US portion of WW2 through to about the early 60s.

        They were an incredible read because he wove so much real world stuff into his fiction, and he did it so seemlessly you had to really try hard to keep fact from fiction separate.

        Thus I can imagine his other works have been great reads as well.
        Life is change. Built models for decades.
        Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
        I didn't for a long time either.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by TripodViking
          If you want a good set of villains, try the first three Sharpe books. Sgt Hakeswill is a guy I keep wanting to strangle all through the text. Don't want to spoil it for those who haven't read, but you're furious that he's still alive (at least I was.)

          The other villains that Cornwell concocted are about the same way. I kept wanting to go to the end and see how he dies, because for me, he just had to.
          I agree completely. Some of Sharpe's Villians are so abominable that I want to kill them myself. Ducros would be my second choice over Hakeswill.

          The trouble with the new Baltar on BSG is that he makes everyone else look dull and incompetent. Here is a guy who goes around talking to himself, making air-love, and getting worked up with foolish grins on his puss when no one else is in the room, and no one seems to even notice.

          I agree that he out-performs the old character, but then so does everyone else, and I enjoy the presence of the old Apollo as the leader of the former convicts and a devious SOB all by himself.

          It is odd, though, that for all of their lack of understanding of human emotions, particularly passion, love and sex, that the Cylon clones are so good at it. Maybe they cloned a hooker for Number Six?
          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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