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  • Archaic items in futuristic films

    ..in the book 2001:A Space Odyssey , they're on the moon, spaceships going here and there [ it is 2001, yes? ]--but they are still using typewriters?? [ I read the book long ago, but I'm pretty sure I remember that aspect --it's the book version, but allow me to include it ]
    ..was watching Soylent Green and I noticed they had Tube TVs in the year 2022
    ..also some rich guy bought his 'furniture' [ aka ***** ] a video game--but it was like 1980s Asteroids..
    ..there are no cell phones
    maybe problems with the world had caused technology to stall...?
    ...in Outland with Sean Connery, we have space stations on other planets with high tech mining, space ships, etc --but they are still using DOS systems on their computers--instead of the much more modern Windows system
    ..any others?
    ok aka ***** has been coded by the forum--see if you guys/girls can figure it out [ no peeking on the internet ]...no malice/etc inteneded
    Last edited by Moulin; 16 Apr 17, 09:38.

  • #2
    Happens the other way around, too. It's not uncommon to see contrails in the sky in older western films, or telephone poles and power lines of in the distance behind a stage coach.

    In order to make computers work, they have to take the newest system available, which isn't even invented yet for many sci-fi films, so you get anachronisms, but nothing as bad as post apocalyptic worlds with lots of weapons, ammo, gasoline, spare parts for souped up engines and tires.


    How many semi-auto handguns have you seen in series about the future? How many AK's? Too many. And why in the do they put lights inside the helmets of their spacesuits, especially the flourescent ones?
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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    • #3
      In Outland they were using shotguns.

      I saw a short-lived TV series set in space where they were unpacking an android from a wood crate padded with straw.

      Firefly made the most sense out of high and low tech together.
      Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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      • #4
        Um, Whollyweird isn't creative, so it's not surprising they can't think what technology in 2100 AD will be like. If they try it just looks hokey.
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        • #5
          thanks for replies..good calls
          I never thought of some of them.....
          ...sometimes I guess they are trying to save money [ that means make more money for themselves ]
          ...the lights inside helmets reminds me of the old Battlestar Galactica--how can they see with lights in their faces? yes
          ...shotguns on Outland does seem like the Old West
          ...they had M16s on Escape From New York that looked futuristic because the hand guards were removed
          ...

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          • #6
            On Star Trek, specifically the episode where they first encountered the Romulans, the system required to fire the ship's phasors required Kirk to give the command to fire, and then someone in the weapons center would push a button to fire weapons. Hard to believe that in the future they would have that time lag. Quite an archaic example of systems engineering/management.

            Hard to understand how the helm, navigation, sensors, and communications would be centralized on the bridge, but not weapons. ????

            See both about 5:40 on video and about 9:00 on video.

            Last edited by lakechampainer; 18 Apr 17, 07:38.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lakechampainer View Post
              On Star Trek, specifically the episode where they first encountered the Romulans, the system required to fire the ship's phasors required Kirk to give the command to fire, and then someone in the weapons center would push a button to fire weapons. Hard to believe that in the future they would have that time lag. Quite an archaic example of systems engineering/management.

              Hard to understand how the helm, navigation, sensors, and communications would be centralized on the bridge, but not weapons. ????

              See both about 5:40 on video and about 9:00 on video.

              interesting....and 'logical' ...very good to point out the ''archaic' lingo/etc

              ..--Star Trek did a somewhat good job at using military/naval lingo in the episodes
              ..Star Wars did a magnificent job with radio chatter and military lingo in the attack on the Death Star--which I think really added much to the scenario/scene/'realism'

              ..now that you mention Star Trek, they did use floppy disk on the computers, yes?
              Last edited by Moulin; 18 Apr 17, 08:37.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Moulin View Post
                interesting....and 'logical' ...very good to point out the ''archaic' lingo/etc

                ..--Star Trek did a somewhat good job at using military/naval lingo in the episodes
                ..Star Wars did a magnificent job with radio chatter and military lingo in the attack on the Death Star--which I think really added much to the scenario/scene/'realism'

                ..now that you mention Star Trek, they did use floppy disk on the computers, yes?
                yes, they did use floppy disks. Of course, though, they had the internet (although not called as such),which, according to one episode, had "the sum total of human knowledge."

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                • #9
                  I used to watch Star Trek everyday--because it was on everyday...I think from 6-7pm maybe..when I was about 14, 15, etc--I think
                  ..really couldn't see the 'details' of the planets/buildings/ships etc with the old TVs...now with the big HDs, I notice so much more

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                  • #10
                    "Furniture" in Soylent Green was the term for a "bought" woman. They weren't hookers in the strictest sense, more like professional "wives".
                    Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

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                    • #11
                      Not just the big HD's.

                      Originally posted by Moulin View Post
                      I used to watch Star Trek everyday--because it was on everyday...I think from 6-7pm maybe..when I was about 14, 15, etc--I think
                      ..really couldn't see the 'details' of the planets/buildings/ships etc with the old TVs...now with the big HDs, I notice so much more
                      Some 10 years ago now, the original Star Trek was re-mastered in HD with CGI effects added, that's why you're noticing so much more.

                      Here are some comparisons of scenes and effects from the 1967 episode “The Doomsday Machine”, which I caught just the other day.


                      Original scene with models on the left, new CGI on the right, the differences are quite noticeable:











                      "I am Groot"
                      - Groot

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                        In Outland they were using shotguns.

                        I saw a short-lived TV series set in space where they were unpacking an android from a wood crate padded with straw.

                        Firefly made the most sense out of high and low tech together.
                        Actually, a shotgun is your best best in a sealed system, rather than a high powered, highly penetrating jacketed round that blows a hole in wall keeping in your oxygen supply.

                        Very little in Firefly made any sense whatsoever, starting with the minimal cargo space aboard an alleged "freighter" and people waving swords around.
                        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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