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Colonial era military movies: like or not?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Kevinmeath View Post
    Wasn't complaining saying two I really liked and one I didn't.

    I liked Mike Snooks book on Isandlwana -- his one on Rorkes Drift is ok but I prefer Adrian Greaves for that battle.
    No worries.

    I agree about Snook's book on Rorkes Drift. His account of Ishandlwana is probably the definitive account.

    I don't think I've read the Greaves book. I'll have to add it to my reading list.
    "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

    Homer


    BoRG

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    • #17
      Another Cooper Colonial goody

      LIVES OF A BENGAL LANCER: Brits in North West Inja, with Franchot Tone and <hiss!> Douglas Dumbrille. Burning straws under finger nails...
      Ending of this seems similar to later GUNGA DIN - "Got to warn troops of ambush..." Or is my memory playing tricks again?

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      • #18
        Favorites: Last of the Mohicans

        (also liked Rob Roy, which was contemporaneous with colonial America, but not really colonial itself...)

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Tascosa View Post
          LIVES OF A BENGAL LANCER: Brits in North West Inja, with Franchot Tone and <hiss!> Douglas Dumbrille. Burning straws under finger nails...
          Ending of this seems similar to later GUNGA DIN - "Got to warn troops of ambush..." Or is my memory playing tricks again?
          Adolf Hitler fully agreed with you, apparently.
          "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
          Samuel Johnson.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by BELGRAVE View Post
            Adolf Hitler fully agreed with you, apparently.
            Ja, Pathans are bolshies!
            ABU KLEA: Hail to thee Fuzzy Wuzzy, you broke a British Square! Or was that another battle? Black Watch still braw lads.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Tascosa View Post
              Ja, Pathans are bolshies!
              ABU KLEA: Hail to thee Fuzzy Wuzzy, you broke a British Square! Or was that another battle? Black Watch still braw lads.
              You're quite right, the Battle of Abu Klea was the basis for Newbolt's poem Vita Lampada.

              "The sand of the desert is sodden red, --
              Red with the wreck of a square that broke; --
              The Gatling's jammed and the colonel dead,"


              The Colonel was indeed the redoubtable Burnaby, but it wasn't a Gatling, it was a Gardner.

              And Adolf did indeed admire Lives of a Bengal Lancer. He saw the British occupation of India as a prototype for the regime he wanted to establish in the Ukraine.
              "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
              Samuel Johnson.

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              • #22
                The New Workd - Terrence Malick

                I loved 'The New World' ... but it is one of those films that people either love, or hate - if you look at the reviews on IMDB they are either gushing "separates the "lovers of cinema" from the "average movie watcher" and "Probably the Greatest Film Ever Made in the U.S.A" or as one critic described it - "like watching paint dry". Other comments include "best sleep I've had in ages" and "who would have guessed that colonising the New World would have been this boring?"

                Yes, it does drag on occasion, and there's not much talking - but it's very far from being that dull. If you love the process of film making then the cinematography alone will keep you watching - but it's not the most exciting film in terms of action and dialogue. The Guardian described it as 'a misunderstood masterpiece':

                http://www.theguardian.com/film/2009...errence-malick

                I'm sure there are some on here who will have hated it. Me personally - I loved it.

                "COOMMAAAAAAANNNNDOOOO!!!!!"
                - Mad Jack Churchill.

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                • #23
                  Zulu Dawn
                  Northwest Passage

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                  • #24
                    Which reminds me: North West Frontier, featuring that Jolly Good Chap, Kenneth More:

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=E_WrGE7Ew-Q

                    A superb film: especially if you like steam trains. (N.B. that magnificent Imperialist line. quoted in the "trailer"as spoken by an Edwardian Grande dame "...Half the world is only civilized because we have made it so").
                    Last edited by BELGRAVE; 13 Sep 13, 16:18.
                    "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
                    Samuel Johnson.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by BELGRAVE View Post
                      You're quite right, the Battle of Abu Klea was the basis for Newbolt's poem Vita Lampada.

                      "The sand of the desert is sodden red, --
                      Red with the wreck of a square that broke; --
                      The Gatling's jammed and the colonel dead,"


                      The Colonel was indeed the redoubtable Burnaby, but it wasn't a Gatling, it was a Gardner.

                      And Adolf did indeed admire Lives of a Bengal Lancer. He saw the British occupation of India as a prototype for the regime he wanted to establish in the Ukraine.

                      I should check, but I confuse Abu Klea and Tamai, both Brit battles with Fuzzy Wuzzy. I believe Tamai was the one where a slight "disruption" in a walking square had Fuzzies *inside the square. This led to a furious, desperate battle that was a bit near run.
                      Years later the Black Watch in Wales would violently react to "Give 'em a pint of Broken Square!" Oh, Kipling!?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Tuck's Luck View Post
                        I loved 'The New World' ... but it is one of those films that people either love, or hate - if you look at the reviews on IMDB they are either gushing "separates the "lovers of cinema" from the "average movie watcher" and "Probably the Greatest Film Ever Made in the U.S.A" or as one critic described it - "like watching paint dry". Other comments include "best sleep I've had in ages" and "who would have guessed that colonising the New World would have been this boring?"

                        Yes, it does drag on occasion, and there's not much talking - but it's very far from being that dull. If you love the process of film making then the cinematography alone will keep you watching - but it's not the most exciting film in terms of action and dialogue. The Guardian described it as 'a misunderstood masterpiece':

                        http://www.theguardian.com/film/2009...errence-malick

                        I'm sure there are some on here who will have hated it. Me personally - I loved it.

                        I've only caught part of it on movie channels, but it didn't look so bad from what I've seen.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Tascosa View Post
                          I should check, but I confuse Abu Klea and Tamai, both Brit battles with Fuzzy Wuzzy. I believe Tamai was the one where a slight "disruption" in a walking square had Fuzzies *inside the square. This led to a furious, desperate battle that was a bit near run.
                          Years later the Black Watch in Wales would violently react to "Give 'em a pint of Broken Square!" Oh, Kipling!?
                          Both battles were near-run things.

                          "So 'ere's to you Fuzzy-Wuzzy at your 'ome in the Sudan,
                          You're a poor benighted 'eathen but a first class-class fightin' man
                          "

                          as depicted in Khartoum, The Four Feathers and Young Winston.
                          "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
                          Samuel Johnson.

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