Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Serious question about documentaries - need your input!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Serious question about documentaries - need your input!

    If you had a choice to see a documentary film... maybe something that you feel has never been touched on or given justice what would it be? It can be any subject... something you like or something you want to know more about?

    I'll start by throwing one out there. I recently went to the Rough and Tumble show in Kinzers, PA. I would like to see a documentary on steam power.



    http://www.roughandtumble.org/index.asp
    Last edited by 101combatvet; 07 Sep 12, 10:59.
    My worst jump story:
    My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
    As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
    No lie.

    ~
    "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
    -2 Commando Jumpmaster

  • #2
    There have been a couple, including two that I have seen on steam tractors specifically.

    Unfortunately, the documentary makers do not share our interests and cater to the lowest common denominator audiences.
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

    Comment


    • #3
      Rough and Tumble...one incredible place. I went when there was a big flea market/show going on. Truly a blast. Not my area of interest but a blast none the less.

      The problem with documentaries is that there is no way to verify their data...no easy way. With a book you can check the bibliography, pull out other books on the subject, investigate the authors credentials, etc. It is a little hard to verify what is going by you on the screen and determine if what you are viewing is accurate. In some cases people may try to change history (holocaust denial) and in others they might be fostering a belief not held by all (conspiracy theories) and in other cases they might just be inaccurate. In the case of something like steam power I would rely on film to get the images of trains moving and the like, but rely on books for data.
      John

      Play La Marseillaise. Play it!

      Comment


      • #4
        More documentaries on the Imperial Japanese Navy...sort of a Dogfights or Battle 360 version of the entire Pacific War.

        -Matt
        SGT, 210th MP Battalion, 2nd MP BDE, MSSG

        Fervently PRO-TRUMP, anti-Islam and anti-Steelers!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
          There have been a couple, including two that I have seen on steam tractors specifically.

          Unfortunately, the documentary makers do not share our interests and cater to the lowest common denominator audiences.
          Thanks.... I didn't know that. I'll have to see what's out there.
          My worst jump story:
          My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
          As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
          No lie.

          ~
          "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
          -2 Commando Jumpmaster

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by JBark View Post
            Rough and Tumble...one incredible place. I went when there was a big flea market/show going on. Truly a blast. Not my area of interest but a blast none the less.

            The problem with documentaries is that there is no way to verify their data...no easy way. With a book you can check the bibliography, pull out other books on the subject, investigate the authors credentials, etc. It is a little hard to verify what is going by you on the screen and determine if what you are viewing is accurate. In some cases people may try to change history (holocaust denial) and in others they might be fostering a belief not held by all (conspiracy theories) and in other cases they might just be inaccurate. In the case of something like steam power I would rely on film to get the images of trains moving and the like, but rely on books for data.
            R&T was a blast... never heard of it before and went and had a look. While in the area it is a must see... amazing what industry was capable back in the day.

            I agree with you on the film... but I enjoy them regardless. Gives me a break from the library.
            My worst jump story:
            My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
            As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
            No lie.

            ~
            "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
            -2 Commando Jumpmaster

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Matt Jones View Post
              More documentaries on the Imperial Japanese Navy...sort of a Dogfights or Battle 360 version of the entire Pacific War.

              -Matt
              Yes.... great topic! I would like to see something on the IJN.
              My worst jump story:
              My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
              As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
              No lie.

              ~
              "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
              -2 Commando Jumpmaster

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 101combatvet View Post
                R&T was a blast... never heard of it before and went and had a look. While in the area it is a must see... amazing what industry was capable back in the day.
                I have to agree. I live about an hour away so I have little excuse for not going again. My first trip there was when I was newly employed with a furniture making shop in this area and our employer said "Take the day off and come with us or stay in the shop and work." (New to Pa. at the time I didn't know what was there to be seen.) I was somewhat new to the trades and luckily had started to appreciate what went in to making things. All I could do was wander about and wonder exactly what you said...how did they do that back then? The castings especially...amazing.
                John

                Play La Marseillaise. Play it!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by JBark View Post
                  I have to agree. I live about an hour away so I have little excuse for not going again. My first trip there was when I was newly employed with a furniture making shop in this area and our employer said "Take the day off and come with us or stay in the shop and work." (New to Pa. at the time I didn't know what was there to be seen.) I was somewhat new to the trades and luckily had started to appreciate what went in to making things. All I could do was wander about and wonder exactly what you said...how did they do that back then? The castings especially...amazing.
                  May also go to the Steam-O-Rama on Oct 4-7.
                  My worst jump story:
                  My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
                  As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
                  No lie.

                  ~
                  "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
                  -2 Commando Jumpmaster

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 101combatvet View Post
                    May also go to the Steam-O-Rama on Oct 4-7.
                    Excellent...thank you.
                    John

                    Play La Marseillaise. Play it!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Every year in St Peters, MO during Old Town Days, they have as a part of the entertainment old engines on display.
                      The engine, built by International Harvester, was one of perhaps 200 antique gasoline, kerosene and steam engines and farm tractors on display Friday and Saturday at the New Old Town Picnic in St. Peters' Old Town Park. Formerly known as the Olde Tyme Picnic, the event also featured rides, food, a beer garden, music, a horse show and a tractor pull.

                      Many of the antique engines sputtered and hummed along, some with large spinning flywheels that rhythmically moved pistons back and forth. Their owners and restorers, members of the Illinois and Missouri Tractor and Engine Club, were demonstrating cutting-edge technology from the early 1900s to World War II, particularly in rural areas.

                      Still, working with old engines isn't easy — steam can scald, fuels are flammable, and moving flywheels and pistons and parts can literally exact a pound of flesh. An ambulance arrived at the club's display Saturday afternoon to attend to an engine owner who got too close. Zalabak said the person lost part of his thumb.
                      Source: http://www.stltoday.com/suburban-jou...9500ce8c4.html

                      I am old enough to have seen an old engine at harvest time. I think they used it to run a bailing machine. The main thing I remember about it is the long, long strap thing that ran from one big wheel to another to run something, just like the picture in the article. It may have been during WWII, because my memory is very vague. I remember all of the neighbors coming in to work and my mother and grand-mother feeding them lunch (dinner).

                      I think a documentary about them would be quite interesting.

                      I would also like to see a documentary about old water power machinery. I have a minor interest in the old timber industry, and ran across an article about a water run saw mill back in colonial days.
                      Homo homini lupus

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jannie View Post
                        The main thing I remember about it is the long, long strap thing that ran from one big wheel to another to run something, just like the picture in the article.
                        Saw them doing the same at the Rough & Tumble. I believe they were measuring the RPM that it could put out. They also have a saw mill that was being run by steam.... interesting stuff.
                        My worst jump story:
                        My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
                        As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
                        No lie.

                        ~
                        "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
                        -2 Commando Jumpmaster

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I love documentaries. I watch them on alot of subjects.
                          This bass guitar kills TERRORISTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                          Comment

                          Latest Topics

                          Collapse

                          Working...
                          X