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Economics for Dummies

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  • #16
    Just finished Sowell a few days ago. Took me a while because I've been so busy and there's only so much one can read on Economics before getting extremely bored.

    That being said, as a whole the book was very interesting and extremely informative. Unfortunately it's hard to remember everything because there's simply so much, but fundamentally I definitely know how look at every day issues from an economic point of view, whereas before I was just another victim of emotional thinking like all the other Liberal sheeple. One really cannot be a true Conservative until they know how to think about things from an economic perspective.

    Anyway, next on the economics list at the recommendation of Cult is The Affluent Society, by Galbraith.
    A wild liberal appears! Conservative uses logical reasoning and empirical evidence! It's super effective! Wild liberal faints.

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    • #17
      ^

      I found the Affluent Society and 'The New Industrial State' to be complementary but by far, his most important work is the latter. Galbraith himself says that it is his best work of theory. I am in agreement: regardless of its publication date (1967) it is simply the best exposition of principled American liberalism and its state of mind that I have read.

      The Affluent Society is much shorter and simpler book (less than half the length as I recall) and is just a partial 'first draft' of NIS.

      If you want to understand Galbraith, the Kennedy Administration, liberalism in the 1960s, and echos from the past, TAS is simply not enough. If you have very limited reading time, just read New Industrial State. If you are willing to read both, I would read TAS and then NIS in one shot.
      Zhitomir-Berdichev, West of Kiev: 24 Dec 1943-31 Jan 1944
      Stalin's Favorite: The Combat History of the 2nd Guards Tank Army
      Barbarossa Derailed I & II
      Battle of Kalinin October 1941

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Cult Icon View Post
        ^

        I found the Affluent Society and 'The New Industrial State' to be complementary but by far, his most important work is the latter. Galbraith himself says that it is his best work of theory. I am in agreement: regardless of its publication date (1967) it is simply the best exposition of principled American liberalism and its state of mind that I have read.

        The Affluent Society is much shorter and simpler book (less than half the length as I recall) and is just a partial 'first draft' of NIS.

        If you want to understand Galbraith, the Kennedy Administration, liberalism in the 1960s, and echos from the past, TAS is simply not enough. If you have very limited reading time, just read New Industrial State. If you are willing to read both, I would read TAS and then NIS in one shot.
        Already bought TAS shortly after your original recommendation.
        A wild liberal appears! Conservative uses logical reasoning and empirical evidence! It's super effective! Wild liberal faints.

        Comment


        • #19
          I'm studying economics right now. My teacher suggested 2 books
          1) Commanding Heights: The Battle for the World Economy by Daniel Yergin and Joseph Stanislaw.

          2) Freakonomics by Steven J. Levitt.

          I have yet read any of them... :/

          And if you want to know more about some basic economic notions, I suggest you go to one of those special campus book stores and pick one up. They're actually really fun to read but can be quite expensive. Here's my book:
          ImageUploadedByTapatalk1334411520.157018.jpg

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          • #20
            Commanding Heights was a popular miniseries ten years back. I believe that the whole thing is uploaded on youtube and the PBS website. It is a bit 'stereotypical' and ideologically tinted with 1990s era neoliberalism but it's a good start.

            Originally posted by Ubermensche View Post
            I'm studying economics right now. My teacher suggested 2 books
            1) Commanding Heights: The Battle for the World Economy by Daniel Yergin and Joseph Stanislaw.

            2) Freakonomics by Steven J. Levitt.

            I have yet read any of them... :/

            And if you want to know more about some basic economic notions, I suggest you go to one of those special campus book stores and pick one up. They're actually really fun to read but can be quite expensive. Here's my book:
            [ATTACH]46984[/ATTACH]
            Zhitomir-Berdichev, West of Kiev: 24 Dec 1943-31 Jan 1944
            Stalin's Favorite: The Combat History of the 2nd Guards Tank Army
            Barbarossa Derailed I & II
            Battle of Kalinin October 1941

            Comment


            • #21
              Personally, I would recommend Nial Ferguson's The Ascent of Money which explains such arcane (to me, anyway) matters as ""Derivatives" and ''Off-Balance Sheet Entities" wonderfully.

              To quote the blurb on the cover :"From the banking dynasty who funded the Italian Renaissance to the stock market bubble that caused the French Revolution, this is the story of booms and busts as it's never been told before.

              With the world in the grip of the biggest financial crisis since the Great Depression,there's never been a better time to understand the ascent-and descent-of money ".

              Quite so.
              "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
              Samuel Johnson.

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              • #22
                I watched the documentary during my economy class. It was really interesting.

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