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Special Forces non-fiction and fiction

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  • lirelou
    replied
    Jack, you can find it on Amazon and Amazon.UK for $21.95 and 13 pounds respectively. The publisher was selling it for $17.95 on his website. http://hellgatepress.com/shaun-darragh/dega

    Andy, I like Saving Ryan's Privates myself. I have a major supporting character named Kevin Ryan,who is a Black medic. One of the chaps he's modeled on took some grenade shrapnel in the family jewels while he was taking a whiz. I can remember his being taken to the medevac (sadly, we lost one KIA and another would die in hospital) bitching that he wasn't 'doin' nothin' but takin' a ****** ****. Can't do nothin' in this country without gettin' your a** shot off..." Not a combat incident, but one of a mishandled grenade. Guess I should have made him the protagonist.

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  • KRJ
    replied
    OSS and OSS related:

    Behind Japanese Lines by Richard Dunlop (history)

    From OSS to Green Berets by COL Aaron Bank (history)

    The Brenner Assignment by Patrick K. O'Donnell (history)

    Knight's Cross by COL Aaron Bank (alternative history novel)

    Master Sniper by Stephen Hunter (novel)

    Where Eagles Dare by Alistair MacLean (novel)

    I know the thread title said non-fiction but I didn't think it would hurt to mention a few novels that the OSS showed up in.
    Last edited by KRJ; 11 Jul 11, 16:25.

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  • JackMurphy
    replied
    Lirelou, when will your book be for sale? It looks right up my ally!

    I also wrote a short story about MACV-SOG in the Vietnam War. It is the first in a series that will follow a mercenary through the 70's and 80's, the second issue taking place in Rhodesia. The first one is called PROMIS: Vietnam, you can find it on Amazon if you like. It is about actual operations and one that could have happened, a SOG raid on COSVN, the alleged VC headquarters.

    For non-fiction, I highly recommend John Stryker Meyer's "Across the Fence". Meyer was a One-Zero who ran his recon team across the border into both Laos and Cambodia. Great memoir.

    Cheers,
    -Jack

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  • Andy_S
    replied
    SNIP
    The Yards could never figure out how westerners got hung up on breasts. In their world, breasts were for babies.
    SNIP

    Those Yards were barbarians. BARBARIANS, I say!

    Seriously if your book covers SF derring do, reefers, loincloths AND the fulsome, sensuous bosoms of native maidens, you have got a bestseller on your hands, so stand by for a deluge of cash and The Call from Hanks, Spielberg and co.

    I suggest the TV miniseries could be called "Band of Bosoms"

    If, OTOH, the big screen beckons - and assuming you want to run with the loincloth angle - perhaps an appropriate title would be
    "Saving Ryan's Privates?"

    Leave a comment:


  • lirelou
    replied
    Andy, not sure of who the guy in the middle is. He's down in a studio photo as 'unknown'. If I'm correct, it was either Doug Martin or Frank Sievers, both KIA. I was hoping that the publisher would do the cover with artwork, but they opted for photoshop.

    As for the hippie in loincloth, he was smoking a tribal pipe, but some of it got cut off in the photoshop. Pity I couldn't find a photo of his true love, in all her bare-breasted beauty. That would have caught some interest. But back in my day, such were considered obscene. The Yards could never figure out how westerners got hung up on breasts. In their world, breasts were for babies.

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  • Andy_S
    replied
    Lirelou:

    RE: The Dega
    And who is that dashing looking young fellow gracing the center of the cover? And who is that hippy in the skirt smoking a massive reefer at bottom left?

    First bloke looks the business; second chap's gone bloody native...

    Seriously, is this the final version? I'll be on the lookout for a class read come late July.

    Leave a comment:


  • lirelou
    replied
    MIKE Force novel

    My novel, The Dega: A MIKE Force novel, set in the II Corps MIKE Force has been announced by Hellgate Press and can be found at http://hellgatepress.com/shaun-darragh/dega Though I may have to have them pull it down. It seems they missed a few corrections>

    Last edited by lirelou; 31 May 11, 14:37.

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  • Frtigern
    replied
    Just finished John Plaster's "Secret Commandos: Behind Enemy Lines with the Elite Warriors of SOG". Way better read than "The Hunt for Bin Laden." These guys had ended up becoming the hunted more often than being the hunters.

    Leave a comment:


  • Legate
    replied
    Originally posted by Andy_S View Post
    You'd better buy this one before it sells out....

    http://www.amazon.com/Spec-Ops-Studi...pd_sim_sbs_b_1

    ....by the US Admiral who commanded the Bin Laden whack.
    Just ordered that book. Best get it while it is cheap,it is now in the top 1300 at Amazon. The hardcover is going for over $200. I bet it will get a new publishing run.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frtigern
    replied
    just finished Robin Moore's "The Hunt for Bin Laden". Good read!

    Leave a comment:


  • SGT Long
    replied
    Originally posted by Dan M View Post
    "Also there is Marcinko's Rogue Warrior. An entertaining read, although I sometime wonder about its accuracy.

    My sentiments exactly. His description of one of his actions in Vietnam were challenged by another participant. (I really should go and find out the name of the action and the name of the person who challenged Marcinko's version. It's too easy just to say it's been discredited without citing the details.) But it is one where Marcinko figured quite prominently in his own account.

    Cheers,
    Dan.
    He's been criticized for a number of years for violating opsec in his books-I'd be interested in hearing the details if you ever stuble across that story.

    Leave a comment:


  • Andy_S
    replied
    You'd better buy this one before it sells out....

    http://www.amazon.com/Spec-Ops-Studi...pd_sim_sbs_b_1

    ....by the US Admiral who commanded the Bin Laden whack.

    Leave a comment:


  • Andy_S
    replied
    Marcus Luttrell's "The One That Got Away" is an excellent first person account of the SEAL Team 10 disaster in Afghan.

    Col. Plaster's books on SOG are excellent, albeit coloured by the fact that he was a member of the unit, so not, perhaps, a critical look at the strategy (or lack thereof) behind SOG's operations.

    "Rogue Warrior of the SAS" is an appalling title but a fair description its subject, Paddy Mayne, David Stirling's No 2 in the WWII SAS and a killing gentleman of the first order. Mayne, like Major Anders Lassen, the Danish knife fighter, was such a murderous character that even other SAS troopers found him frightening. The same was true to a lesser extent of Major "Mad Mike" Calvert - who Mayne once threw through a tabletop. I have not read Calvert's book, "Fighting Mad," but anyone who relished counter-charging a charging Japanese unit in hand-to-hand fighting "("It was medieval - just like an old time battle!") is an alpha ++ male.

    Speaking of which, there is a very, very good story in the immortal "Private MacAuslan" series by George McDonald Fraser on how regular Highland officers viewed these kinds of freebooting, ruthless SF veterans after the war.

    And of course, Fitzroy Maclean's "Eastern Approaches" is arguably THE classic of SF writing. His exploits in the Middle East are the stuff of legend and - unlike most SF ops - had an actual strategic impact.

    For female special forces -SOE agents operating with the Maquis in occupied France - read "Carve Her Name with Pride" on Violette Szvabo, George Cross; and "Odette" on Odette Churchill: codename 'Elise.' Odette also won the George Cross, though she survived the Gestapo treatment. (The bravest man I have ever known considered Odette his hero, and his memory of her inspired his own remarkable exploits in North Korean prison camps.) They are excellent books and good films if you can find them. For obvious reasons, the first one is a bit of a tear jerker.

    Perhaps the best fictional (VERY fictional) special forces film is "Where Eagles Dare" though I have never read the novel. But if you want to watch Clint Eastwood and Richard Burton mowing down battalions of Germans while fighting on cable cars, wining WWII singlehandedly, etc, etc, this is it.

    And I second Ms Saigon's recommendation on "The MIKE Force" - perhaps the most eagerly awaited book ever on ACG.

    Leave a comment:


  • lynelhutz
    replied
    Originally posted by Dan M View Post
    "Also there is Marcinko's Rogue Warrior. An entertaining read, although I sometime wonder about its accuracy.

    My sentiments exactly. His description of one of his actions in Vietnam were challenged by another participant. (I really should go and find out the name of the action and the name of the person who challenged Marcinko's version. It's too easy just to say it's been discredited without citing the details.) But it is one where Marcinko figured quite prominently in his own account.

    Cheers,
    Dan.
    Yes, I also recall reading in the account of a SEAL who's unit replaced Marcinko's and he suggested, as gently as possible, that Marcinko himself tended to avoid going out on operations.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan M
    replied
    "Also there is Marcinko's Rogue Warrior. An entertaining read, although I sometime wonder about its accuracy.

    My sentiments exactly. His description of one of his actions in Vietnam were challenged by another participant. (I really should go and find out the name of the action and the name of the person who challenged Marcinko's version. It's too easy just to say it's been discredited without citing the details.) But it is one where Marcinko figured quite prominently in his own account.

    Cheers,
    Dan.

    Leave a comment:

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