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  • Special Forces non-fiction and fiction

    I am looking for good books on the Special Forces that are based on actual operations that have taken place or that could've taken place. I am not particular to which period, WW2 to the future. I would like to read non-fiction that isn't dry, some historical writers can make the most exciting actions, exceedingly dull. I also want to find some special forces fiction that is either supported by first hand accounts or written by a Special Operator who knows how to write well; does a creative writing black ops commando even exist?

    Thanks
    The Europa Barbarorum II team [M2TW] needs YOUR HELP NOW HERE!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Frtigern View Post
    I am looking for good books on the Special Forces that are based on actual operations that have taken place or that could've taken place. I am not particular to which period, WW2 to the future. I would like to read non-fiction that isn't dry, some historical writers can make the most exciting actions, exceedingly dull. I also want to find some special forces fiction that is either supported by first hand accounts or written by a Special Operator who knows how to write well; does a creative writing black ops commando even exist?

    Thanks
    Don Bendell is awesome.
    Funny guy too if you ever get to talk to him.
    Delegate, MN GOP.

    PATRIA SI, COMUNISMO NO

    http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/p...?id=1156276727

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    • #3










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      • #4






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        • #5
          I can't help you outside of Veitnam

          FYI. One of our members, an actual "Fighting Soldier From the Sky" who served in Vietnam is about to publish his first book. PM Lirelou for more information about getting your copy hot of the presses.
          Last edited by Miss Saigon; 13 Apr 11, 22:32.

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          • #6
            What about.....

            Robin Moore's 'The Green Berets' (1965). The book that started everything the public knows about Special Forces. Great writer, good stories, and the eternal debate over which story and how much of it is fact, or fiction. You can't go wrong by starting there.

            However, others may differ.

            Cheers,
            Dan.
            So long as men worship the Caesars and Napoleons, Caesars and Napoleons will duly rise and make them miserable.

            Aldous Huxley: Ends and Means (1937)

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            • #7
              Read and enjoyed 'Bravo-Two Zero' Andy Mcnabb but how accurate?. If you read it you have to get 'The one that got away' by T Ryan as title suggests its by the only one of the patrol to escape and takes a differnt view point of the opperation. Believe there are some other books out about the patrol but not read them.
              Cymru am Byth

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              • #8
                For the Australians, David Horner's "SAS Phantoms of the Jungle" which should be read with Gary McKay's "Sleeping with your ears open". Also, Ian McNiell's "The Team" covers those Australians with the MIKE Forces, though Horner and McNiell may be a bit dry. McKay's book is more of a "how we operated" account.
                Last edited by lirelou; 14 Apr 11, 23:18.
                dit: Lirelou

                Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá ǵ!

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                • #9
                  in regards to BRAVO TWO ZERO there is an interesting point of view written by another SAS soldier Michael Asher called THE REAL BRAVO TWO ZERO, where he retraces the steps of the patrol, interviews Iraqis and critically examines BRAVO TWO ZERO and THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY and makes some interesting findings....
                  the next three books are autobiographical
                  CLOSE QUARTER BATTLE by Mike Curtis traces a soldier through the Falklands (paras)and the iraq conflict ( SAS) and after. Recommended
                  The EYE OF THE STORM by Peter Ratcliff also covers a soldier as a para in Nth Ireland and as SAS noncom in the Falklands and RSM of SAS in iraq. Great reading
                  KILLING ZONE by Harry Mc Callion again covers the progress of a soldier through the paras and SAS. enjoyed reading it.
                  to my great shame, I have not read any Australian bigraphical accounts of their latest operations including Timor, Iraq and Afghanistan

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Frtigern View Post
                    I am looking for good books on the Special Forces that are based on actual operations that have taken place or that could've taken place. I am not particular to which period, WW2 to the future. I would like to read non-fiction that isn't dry, some historical writers can make the most exciting actions, exceedingly dull. I also want to find some special forces fiction that is either supported by first hand accounts or written by a Special Operator who knows how to write well; does a creative writing black ops commando even exist?

                    Thanks
                    S.O.G. by John Plaster

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Miss Saigon View Post









                      All Great Choices.

                      There was another which I think was called "A Year in SOG" but I can't remember the author. Also there was another I recall called "The Village" but I suppose the latter wasn't technically about "special forces" operations.

                      Also there is Marcinko's Rogue Warrior. An entertaining read, although I sometime wonder about its accuracy. Similarly I thought Bravo Two Zero by Andy McNab and The One That Got Away by Chris Ryan were great reads but sometimes one wonders whether the story telling got in the way of the accuracy
                      Last edited by lynelhutz; 22 Apr 11, 09:28.

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                      • #12
                        "Also there is Marcinko's Rogue Warrior. An entertaining read, although I sometime wonder about its accuracy.

                        My sentiments exactly. His description of one of his actions in Vietnam were challenged by another participant. (I really should go and find out the name of the action and the name of the person who challenged Marcinko's version. It's too easy just to say it's been discredited without citing the details.) But it is one where Marcinko figured quite prominently in his own account.

                        Cheers,
                        Dan.
                        So long as men worship the Caesars and Napoleons, Caesars and Napoleons will duly rise and make them miserable.

                        Aldous Huxley: Ends and Means (1937)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Dan M View Post
                          "Also there is Marcinko's Rogue Warrior. An entertaining read, although I sometime wonder about its accuracy.

                          My sentiments exactly. His description of one of his actions in Vietnam were challenged by another participant. (I really should go and find out the name of the action and the name of the person who challenged Marcinko's version. It's too easy just to say it's been discredited without citing the details.) But it is one where Marcinko figured quite prominently in his own account.

                          Cheers,
                          Dan.
                          Yes, I also recall reading in the account of a SEAL who's unit replaced Marcinko's and he suggested, as gently as possible, that Marcinko himself tended to avoid going out on operations.

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                          • #14
                            Marcus Luttrell's "The One That Got Away" is an excellent first person account of the SEAL Team 10 disaster in Afghan.

                            Col. Plaster's books on SOG are excellent, albeit coloured by the fact that he was a member of the unit, so not, perhaps, a critical look at the strategy (or lack thereof) behind SOG's operations.

                            "Rogue Warrior of the SAS" is an appalling title but a fair description its subject, Paddy Mayne, David Stirling's No 2 in the WWII SAS and a killing gentleman of the first order. Mayne, like Major Anders Lassen, the Danish knife fighter, was such a murderous character that even other SAS troopers found him frightening. The same was true to a lesser extent of Major "Mad Mike" Calvert - who Mayne once threw through a tabletop. I have not read Calvert's book, "Fighting Mad," but anyone who relished counter-charging a charging Japanese unit in hand-to-hand fighting "("It was medieval - just like an old time battle!") is an alpha ++ male.

                            Speaking of which, there is a very, very good story in the immortal "Private MacAuslan" series by George McDonald Fraser on how regular Highland officers viewed these kinds of freebooting, ruthless SF veterans after the war.

                            And of course, Fitzroy Maclean's "Eastern Approaches" is arguably THE classic of SF writing. His exploits in the Middle East are the stuff of legend and - unlike most SF ops - had an actual strategic impact.

                            For female special forces -SOE agents operating with the Maquis in occupied France - read "Carve Her Name with Pride" on Violette Szvabo, George Cross; and "Odette" on Odette Churchill: codename 'Elise.' Odette also won the George Cross, though she survived the Gestapo treatment. (The bravest man I have ever known considered Odette his hero, and his memory of her inspired his own remarkable exploits in North Korean prison camps.) They are excellent books and good films if you can find them. For obvious reasons, the first one is a bit of a tear jerker.

                            Perhaps the best fictional (VERY fictional) special forces film is "Where Eagles Dare" though I have never read the novel. But if you want to watch Clint Eastwood and Richard Burton mowing down battalions of Germans while fighting on cable cars, wining WWII singlehandedly, etc, etc, this is it.

                            And I second Ms Saigon's recommendation on "The MIKE Force" - perhaps the most eagerly awaited book ever on ACG.
                            A massive attack...a brigade against an army...three nights of battle...an unforgettable tragedy.
                            Sixty years later, the full story is told at last:
                            http://tothelastround.wordpress.com/

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                            • #15
                              You'd better buy this one before it sells out....

                              http://www.amazon.com/Spec-Ops-Studi...pd_sim_sbs_b_1

                              ....by the US Admiral who commanded the Bin Laden whack.
                              A massive attack...a brigade against an army...three nights of battle...an unforgettable tragedy.
                              Sixty years later, the full story is told at last:
                              http://tothelastround.wordpress.com/

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