Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Moche Warrior culture of Peru

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Moche Warrior culture of Peru

    Christopher Donnan's book MOCHE PORTRAITS FROM ANCIENT PERU:
    I can't post links yet(oh well)

    From the introduction of Donnan's book:
    About thirteen centuries ago in the northern coastal region of what is now Peru, a ten-year-old boy was selected by the leaders of his community to become, eventually, a great leader himself. As he grew older, he took on more and more responsibility, and finally he achieved his destiny as a man of high status and regard. During his adult life, he occasionally participated in a form of one-on-one ritual combat that was common among his people. While he was still young and strong, he won all of his encounters, but when he reached middle age, he lost a battle and joined the ranks of the defeated. According to the custom of his people, he and the others who had been defeated were stripped of their clothing, ornaments, and weapons. Their hands were then bound behind their backs, and they were led with ropes around their necks to a ceremonial location, where their blood was drained into goblets, to be consumed by priests as part of a traditional ritual. The ritual concluded with the prisoners' death and dismemberment.
    Although the details of this story are speculative, we have grounds for believing that the essence of it is accurate. This leader's people, whom we now call the Moche, showed us through their painted ceramics a complete narrative of their ritual combat and the subsequent capture, sacrifice, and dismemberment of the defeated. The stories in Moche paintings are supported by archaeological excavations of elaborate tombs containing the remains of the ceremony's participants and of the mutilated and dismembered bodies of sacrificed prisoners. But most important for the purposes of this book, the Moche people commemorated this man's existence with a series of lifelike ceramic portraits of him from childhood through his final role as a prisoner about to be sacrificed. Although we can never know his name, the Moche captured his facial features so accurately that we would recognize him immediately if we saw him walking down the street of a Peruvian city today
    <a href="http://imgur.com/HpNhO" title="Hosted by imgur.com">http://imgur.com/HpNhO.jpg</a>


    Two portraits of the same individual from different potters and most likely, years.
    They appeared to look up to and idolize these warriors in the same way we worship sports figures today, except that the Moche also incorporated Sacred religious ritual. The vessels are often found to have held alcoholic beverages and I can imagine men gathered together in the evenings drinking and trading their head collections with one another.
    Last edited by unclefred; 14 Mar 11, 16:03.
    "A common thug can kill someone, but it takes the talents of an intelligence service to make a murder appear to be a suicide or accident death." -- James Angleton, CIA, Chief of Counterintelligence.

  • #2
    Some Warrior ceramics (non-vessel) that I like:
    <a href="http://imgur.com/a7MPI" title="Hosted by imgur.com">http://imgur.com/a7MPI.jpg</a>


    "A common thug can kill someone, but it takes the talents of an intelligence service to make a murder appear to be a suicide or accident death." -- James Angleton, CIA, Chief of Counterintelligence.

    Comment

    Latest Topics

    Collapse

    Working...
    X