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"Phantom versus MiG-21 (Fighter Performance in Practice)

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  • "Phantom versus MiG-21 (Fighter Performance in Practice)

    Well, "Phantom versus MiG-21 (Fighter Performance in Practice) appeared at Amazon...

    http://www.amazon.com/Phantom-versus...8280240&sr=1-1
    Attached Files

  • #2
    They are Serbian authors?
    It is always more difficult to fight against faith than against knowledge.

    Косово је Србија!
    Never go to war with a country whose national holiday celebrates a defeat in 1389.

    Armored Brigade

    Armored Brigade Facebook page

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    • #3
      Yugoslav, I think, but do not trust me ...

      http://books.google.com/books?prints...page&q&f=false

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      • #4
        Never trusted hardware versus hardware. It all comes down to pilots, crew, and maintenance.
        Are we there yet?

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        • #5
          I wish there are more official fighter comparisons like this ... questionable TAC evaluation:

          "The evaluation of the USN F-8E found that the MiG-21 could out turn the F-8 in a close-in performance was comparable fight.Zoom below 25.000 ft and on station time was then. Comparable size Large and prominent smoke trail was a disadvantage. The F-8E was capable of Exceeding the MiG-21 speed limit at low altitude. Acceleration performance was better than the MiG-21 at low and medium altitudes below 2.1 Mach

          ADC Evaluated the F-106 and found its radar capable of acquisition and radar that snap-up attack with all aspect armament should be used to exploit MiG-21 lack of fire control. The F-106 could use to get better acceleration beyond MiG-21 speed limit if not in position to Advantageous. The F-106 should use missiles then close in to kill gun position. It was the consensus of ADC that the U.S. needed to expedite procurement of cannon for F-106, and replacement of its canopy bar with clear pane. It was Concluded that the F-106 shouldn t attempt a slow turning speed contest and should keep its speed from 400-450 KCAS during patrol and engagement.

          The TAC evaluation of the F-5A revealed that within performance limits, the F-5 had Considerable capability to engage the MiG-21. The F-5 had performance advantage feet below 15,000, however the MiG-21 had higher Mach capability at higher altitude. Overall comparison turn what about equal and level acceleration was equal in military power, MiG-21 had a slight advantage in afterburner. They had comparable fire control systems. The F-5 tactical engagement effectively controlled the defensive and if separation was necessary, the F-5 could exceed the MiG-21 airspeed limit below 15.000 ft. The F-5 could closely simulate the MiG-21 up to Mach 1.2 for combat crew training in ACM, dissimilar aircraft engagements. "

          or "Fighter Performance In Practice: F-4 Phantom vs MiG-21"
          Attached Files

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          • #6
            similar titles would be welcomed !

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            • #7
              Quite interesting. Thanks.

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              • #8
                Back some years ago a defector flew a Mig 21 to Japan from USSR. The Soviet government demanded the plane back and it was returned after being inspected for drugs or other counterban.
                During the inspection it was noticed that there were rust spots on the airframe. No known airframe materal rusts except steel, which the plane was constructed from, and though the top speed was well above mach 1 the plane could not carry enough fuel to reach its top speed. Phantom's had the flight charactics of a brick but could out run a Mig going stright up.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by LtCol View Post
                  Back some years ago a defector flew a Mig 21 to Japan from USSR. The Soviet government demanded the plane back and it was returned after being inspected for drugs or other counterban.
                  During the inspection it was noticed that there were rust spots on the airframe. No known airframe materal rusts except steel, which the plane was constructed from, and though the top speed was well above mach 1 the plane could not carry enough fuel to reach its top speed. Phantom's had the flight charactics of a brick but could out run a Mig going stright up.
                  That was a Mig 25.

                  Viktor Ivanovich Belenko (Виктор Иванович Беленко) (born February 15, 1947) is Soviet defector and aerospace engineer and lecturer. Belenko was sentenced to death in the Soviet Union for state treason.[1] He was born in Nalchik, Russian SFSR in a Ukrainian family. Lieutenant Belenko was a pilot with the 513th Fighter Regiment, 11th Air Army, Soviet Air Defence Forces based in Chuguyevka, Primorsky Krai. His name became known worldwide on September 6, 1976, when he successfully defected to the West, flying his Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25 "Foxbat" jet fighter to Hakodate, Japan. This was the first time that Western experts were able to get a close look at the aircraft, and it revealed many secrets and surprises. His defection caused a lot of damage to the Soviet Union Air Force.[2] Belenko was granted asylum by U.S. President Gerald Ford, and a trust fund was set up for him, granting him a very comfortable living in later years. The U.S. Government interrogated and debriefed him for five months after his defection, and employed him as a consultant for several years thereafter.
                  The MiG was disassembled, examined, and returned to the USSR in thirty crates. Belenko had brought with him the pilot's manual for the MiG-25 "Foxbat", expecting to assist American pilots in evaluating and testing the aircraft. However, the Japanese government only allowed the U.S. to examine the plane and do ground tests of the radar and engines.[citation needed]
                  Belenko was not the only pilot to have defected from the USSR in this way, nor was he the first such to defect from a Soviet-bloc country. In March and May 1953, two Polish Air Force pilots flew MiG-15s to Denmark. Later in 1953, North Korean pilot No Kum Sok flew his MiG-15 to an American air base in South Korea; this MiG is on permanent display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force near Dayton, Ohio. In 1985 and 1987, USSR-owned helicopters in the Afghanistan theatre of operations defected to Pakistan. Captain Alexander Zuyev flew his MiG-29 to Trabzon, Turkey on May 20, 1989.

                  Interesting read.

                  Last edited by Half Pint John; 21 Mar 12, 14:51.

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                  • #10
                    though the top speed was well above mach 1 the plane could not carry enough fuel to reach its top speed.
                    IF what your saying is fact, that it could not carry enough fuel, then how do we know what it's top speed is?

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                    • #11
                      Well, that don't look like a Russian flight helmet to me. Too lazy to get the exact id, but it's a late sixties to seventies type US jet helmet.

                      Not sure of the oxygen mask, isn't that one of those sixties type US masks with relatively wide flaps?

                      Someone did some sloppy investigating there.
                      But then, so did I in this reply.
                      He did fly jets in the US, maybe they adapted the first picture of him they could find and it happened to be like that.

                      Yeah, the pilot wins the fight.
                      I guess one should put two equally good pilots in a MiG21 and an F-4 and let them duel it out in 10 different engagements. That must have been done in the US in the past.
                      MiG25 wasn't much of a fighter, was it? interceptor, recce.

                      cheers
                      "For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return"

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