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Current Favourite Fictional Book?

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  • Current Favourite Fictional Book?

    Not actually reading them, but over hearing my wife read the Harry Potter books to our kids. Thoroughly enjoying.
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  • #2
    Enjoying David Ignatius' novels on CIA operatives and actions--Body of Lies, Agents of Innocence, The Increment, The Quantum Spy.....
    Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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    • #3
      Reading a James Rollins book - The Bone Labyrinth - based on the theory of intermingling of homo Neanderthalus, Cro Magnon and Denisovan subspecies in the origin of modern homo Sapiens. I prefer fiction that is solidly based on scientific and historical fact to support a tight plot. Rollins is one of the few that has mastered that.
      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
        Reading a James Rollins book - The Bone Labyrinth - based on the theory of intermingling of homo Neanderthalus, Cro Magnon and Denisovan subspecies in the origin of modern homo Sapiens. I prefer fiction that is solidly based on scientific and historical fact to support a tight plot. Rollins is one of the few that has mastered that.
        Sounds interesting
        Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post

          Sounds interesting
          I like him, although he does go a bit overboard at times. Rollins, Berry, Baldacci, Brown and Lee Childs and Lincoln Childs (of Preston and Childs - Tyrannosaurus Canyon). For Preston and Childs Riptide (based on the Oak Island treasure) and Thunderhead (based on the theory of cannabalism at the end of the Anasazi period).

          Berry: The Amber Room, The Venetian Betrayal, The Charlemagne Pursuit, etc. All based on actual know history as the starting point.

          Baldacci: because he writes a great story and often bases it on known history or government processes,and his mysteries based on the curator of the Library of Congress and the Culper Ring begun by G. Washington are outstanding.

          Lee Childs because as Jack Reacher he knows the military mind and environment to a T, and often includes some interesting historical facts as well.

          There are some others as well, but these authors are my current favorites, the ones I pick up automatically when I see them.

          Cussler used to be on the list, but he stopped using real history a long time ago and went off on a tangent where anything goes.
          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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          • #6
            Over halfway through The Bone Labyrinth, I am enjoying it. His story line is much like Indiana Jones movies and Brown's The Da Vinci Code and sequels.
            Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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            • #7
              I would my favorite fiction books would be the Wingman series by Mac Maloney, the Carrier and SEAL team 7 series by Keith Douglass, the Richard Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell, and the Amanda Garret series by the late James H. Cobb.

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              • #8
                Just started Bernard Cornwell's Saxon Series with "The Last Kingdom". As usual, Cornwell is a great storyteller with good historical background.
                Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
                  Just started Bernard Cornwell's Saxon Series with "The Last Kingdom". As usual, Cornwell is a great storyteller with good historical background.
                  Although I quite enjoyed his Sharpe, Starbuck and other series, and look foward to other books in these series, IMO Cornwell's ''Last Kingdom'' is probably his best series.

                  That said, I would love to see an ending to the Starbuck serie eventually!

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                  • #10
                    Looking at different authors of historical novels to better balance my reading time from the more academic minded books.

                    Tom Wilson - Thud serie over Vietnam
                    Douglass Reeman's Blackwood Serie
                    Jeff Shaara's WW2 Triology (Rising tide, Steel wave, No Less than Victory)
                    Simon Scarrow' Eagles of the Empire serie

                    Comments about these one?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Nick the Noodle View Post
                      Not actually reading them, but over hearing my wife read the Harry Potter books to our kids. Thoroughly enjoying.
                      Try Ravenspur- the Rise of the Tudors- the final book in Conn Ingulden's Wars of the Roses Series.

                      Ingulden provides a tightly written last book, with a very penetrating look at King Richard the third's, and King Henry the seventh's Psyche's.
                      The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

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                      • #12
                        Writing a dissertation at the moment so too much factual reading to do to have time for fiction but the late Terry Pratchett's Discworld series would have to be in there although not so keen on the witches ones
                        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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                        • #13
                          I just started reading 'The Seven Hills'. by John Maddox Roberts. It's the continuation of 'Hannibal Children' and it's alternate military history set in Ancient Rome (about 100 BC). HC was good and I recommend it if you are interested in AH and ancient Rome.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
                            Just started Bernard Cornwell's Saxon Series with "The Last Kingdom". As usual, Cornwell is a great storyteller with good historical background.
                            I've read most of Bernard Cornwell's books. Enjoyed them all. My favorite book of his is "The Fort"

                            From Cornwell's page:


                            "THE FORT is about the Penobscot Expedition of 1779. A small British garrison had been established in what is now Maine (and was then part of Massachusetts), and the rebel government in Boston was determined to expel that garrison"
                            "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it" Beatrice Evelyn Hall
                            Updated for the 21st century... except if you are criticizing islam, that scares the $hii+e out of me!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 17thfabn View Post

                              I've read most of Bernard Cornwell's books. Enjoyed them all. My favorite book of his is "The Fort"

                              From Cornwell's page:


                              "THE FORT is about the Penobscot Expedition of 1779. A small British garrison had been established in what is now Maine (and was then part of Massachusetts), and the rebel government in Boston was determined to expel that garrison"
                              I read and enjoyed "The Fort".

                              If you like Cornwell's storying telling based on solid historical research, you should try SJA Turney's Marius' Mules series (12 books) during Caesar's Gallic wars. Turney does a great job in detail and enlivening Caesar's memoirs through interesting leaders and detailed knowledge of the Roman Army at war.
                              Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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