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  • Building up my Library

    Now I'm getting my own place again I want to start building up a few military history books. Whilst back in the UK i bought the following:

    A Bridge too Far - Cornelius Ryan
    Panzer Commander - Hans von Luck
    Wings on my Sleeve - Captain Eric 'Winkle' Brown

    I have nearly finished the first and really enjoyed it!

    Any other books you can recommend as a 'must have'??

    Thanks

    Wolster

  • #2
    If you tell us what exactly you liked about these books that would be helpful.

    Can't go wrong with Company Commander give the above, though.

    Comment


    • #3
      Sorry, I'm really looking for books from WW2 although wouldn't rule out WW1, Korea and Vietnam. I would say readability and factual content (I know, contentious!) are the main things. I bought both 'A bridge to far' and 'Panzer Commander' after hearing about them on this site.
      Wolster

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      • #4
        To War in a Stringbag by Charles Lamb is a great read.
        Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

        "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

        What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

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        • #5
          Go ahead and get Ryan's The Longest Day and The Last Battle.

          You will like John Keegan's Six Armies in Normandy and The Second World War.

          Also, Alister Horne's To Lose a Battle, Richard Overy's Russia's War (gets you into the eastern front)

          rna
          Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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          • #6
            Here's a few of my favourites:

            "War of the Running Dogs" Noel Barber (Malayan Emergency and how to REALLY fight a successful COIN campaign.)

            "Miracle at Midway" by Gordon Prange (Also get "Shattered Sword" by Jonathan Parshall and Anthony Tully for the Jap side of the story.)

            "Guadalcanal" by Richard Frank (THE definitive account of the heroic struggle on, in the above, and in the seas, around Guadalcanal.)

            "The Most Dangerous Enemy" by Stephen Bungay (How the Battle of Britain was won by the British.)

            "A Time for Trumpets" by Charles B. MacDonald (How the US fought its biggest land campaign, and how a handful of isolated US infantrymen and engineers frustrated the German plans.)

            "A Better War" by Lewis Sorley (How the US won the Vietnam War, and how politicians snatched victory from the jaws of defeat by stabbing SVN in the back.)

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            • #7
              Hmm

              A few must have's.

              Enemy at the Gates
              Band of Brothers
              Tigers in the Mud
              Sniper on the Eastern Front
              Patton: A Genius for War (I am almost done with)

              I can give more if needed.

              Chad
              "History does not entrust the care of freedom to the weak or timid." Dwight D. Eisenhower

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              • #8
                To Hell and Back - Audie Murphy
                Were Were Soldiers Once...And Young. - LT GEN Harold Moore
                Guns Up! - Johnny Clark
                Behind Hitler's Lines - Thomas H. Taylor
                Band of Brothers - Stephen Ambrose

                Just a could of my favorites you might be interested in.

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                • #9
                  A lot of great titles listed so far, but someone has to represent the Krauts here.

                  "The Forsaken Army" by Guy Sajer, a very powerful read.

                  "Holt Hartmann vom Himmel" or the English title- "The Blond Knight of Germany"
                  by Raymond Toliver & Trevor Constable.

                  "A Solider of the Great War" by Mark Helprin. A laborious start, but from there on a terrific read. Tale of an Italian solider in WWI

                  "The Killer Angels" by Michael Shaara. Great book on the American Civil War.

                  "The Wild Blue" by Stephen Ambrose. Great read, good info.

                  At the moment I'm starting "The Military Experience in the Age of Reason- 1715-1789" by Christopher Duffy. Off to a good start.
                  Last edited by cyberia; 08 Jul 07, 12:35. Reason: dropped word
                  ACG QUOTE OF THE WEEK:
                  ¿Cualquier persona fija en el nude? Slug

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cyberia View Post
                    A lot of great titles listed so far, but someone has to represent the Krauts here.

                    "The Forsaken Army" by Guy Sajer, a very powerful read.

                    "Holt Hartmann vom Himmel" or the English title- "The Blond Knight of Germany"
                    by Raymond Toliver & Trevor Constable.

                    "A Solider of the Great War" by Mark Helprin. A laborious start, but from there on a terrific read. Tale of an Italian solider in WWI

                    "The Killer Angels" by Michael Shaara. Great book on the American Civil War.

                    "The Wild Blue" by Stephen Ambrose. Great read, good info.

                    At the moment I'm starting "The Military Experience in the Age of Reason- 1715-1789" by Christopher Duffy. Off to a good start.
                    Yes, the Killer Angels is a must have.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Try a fresh look at WWII:
                      Read Cross of Iron by John Mossier. I also heard the Blitzkrieg Myth by him is also quite good.
                      How many Allied tanks it would take to destroy a Maus?
                      275. Because that's how many shells there are in the Maus. Then it could probably crush some more until it ran out of gas. - Surfinbird

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                      • #12
                        Personally, I'm skeptical about John Mossier. His historical and military analysis left a lot to be desired, and were not entirely convincing. He did not have a good grasp of the facts, did not use whatever that he did have to justify his arguments well, and he had not demonstrated a familiarity with the conditions and concepts of war.

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                        • #13
                          Why does everyone and their aunt have to promote Company Commander?

                          I have the book, I read it years ago. It's an ok book, but it's full of factual errors admittedly understandable for the time.

                          My library has a massive selection, but I'll leave americanocentric titles for my American friends and suggest too good titles from the Canadian participation in the war.
                          The D-Day Dodgers a great book about the men that fought in Italy
                          and
                          The Long Left Flank the fighting by Canada all through the Low Countries.

                          Those two books are still in print so should be ok to locate.
                          Life is change. Built models for decades.
                          Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
                          I didn't for a long time either.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ogukuo72 View Post
                            Here's a few of my favourites:

                            "War of the Running Dogs" Noel Barber (Malayan Emergency and how to REALLY fight a successful COIN campaign.
                            I a reading this one now. I don't like the writing style. It is as if the author is trying to write like it is a novel, and a simplistic one at that. But given there aren't too many books on this subject out there it will have to do.

                            The author also sets out to show how they did it right in Malaya but wrong in Vietnam. I will have more to say on this when I finish the book.

                            M.S.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by creeping death View Post
                              Enemy at the Gates
                              I have heard someone say that Enemy at the gates relies too much on corrupted Soviet sources, taking them as fact. Apparently that sniper thing that the movie was made about was mostly Soviet invented propaganda and cannot be verified. Along with other things.

                              This is just something I have heard so I offer it. WWII is not my area of history.

                              M.S.

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