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Book that Analyzes Lee's Battles???

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  • Book that Analyzes Lee's Battles???

    Can anyone recommend a book that analyzes Robert E. Lee as a strategist? I'm looking for something that breaks down his battles and analyzes them from a maneuver warfare perspective.

    Not sure where to start. I did a quick search, and it looks like there are a ton of books about him, but most seem to be standard biographies.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Fading Captain
    ". . . those who win every battle are not really skillful--those who render other's armies helpless without fighting are the best of all." Sun Tzu, The Art of War

  • #2
    I have such a book right here, it is :

    Grant and Lee: A study in personality and Generalship by Major General J.F.C. Fuller

    Fuller states the book is more about their personalities than anything else but he by neccessity cover alot of their respective strategic decision making. He reckond that Grant was the better General overall. Worth a read anyway.
    http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Wolfe Tone
      I have such a book right here, it is :

      Grant and Lee: A study in personality and Generalship by Major General J.F.C. Fuller

      Fuller states the book is more about their personalities than anything else but he by neccessity cover alot of their respective strategic decision making. He reckond that Grant was the better General overall. Worth a read anyway.
      Much thanks! It looks like a good book, and I will certainly put it on the "to read" list. I read "Battle Cry of Freedom" over the summer and the author of that book argued that Grant was much more of a maneuver general than an attritionist. He even said that, especially later in the war, Lee was the real attritionist.

      Since posting my original message, I stumbled across a book by Bevin Alexander called " Robert E. Lee's Civil War." The book appears to be exactly what I'm looking for; it is an analysis of Lee's tactics and maneuver techniques. But, at least at Amazon, it has received a lot of negative reviews, which you almost never see at Amazon (I remember a few years back when Amazon had the controversy over consciously creating positive customer "reviews").

      I have another book of Alexander's, "How Hitler Could Have Won WWII." When I read this I guess I'll see what kind of an author he is.

      Fading Captain
      Last edited by Fading Captain; 13 Oct 02, 14:18.
      ". . . those who win every battle are not really skillful--those who render other's armies helpless without fighting are the best of all." Sun Tzu, The Art of War

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      • #4
        Grant's Vicksburg campaign of 1863 was a great example of maneuver warfare. Cut of from his base of supply and facing a numerically superior enemy force Grant was able to win several battles in a row before putting Vicksburg to seige.
        "There is no great genius without some touch of madness."

        Seneca (5 BC - 65 AD)

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        • #5
          Yes a brilliant campaign and the one that above all puts Grant up there with the Great Captian's of History.

          While on the subject try Fuller's 3 volume '' The Decisive Battles of the Western World'' for an excellent coverage of western military history.
          http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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          • #6
            The Warrior Generals: Combat Leadership in the Civil War
            by Thomas B. Buell. You can get it at Amazon. Excellent analysis of Lee's operational skills. Not the usual Lee worship that is common in most histories of the war.

            brevet
            And we are here as on a darkling plain
            Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
            Where ignorant armies clash by night.


            Matthew Arnold

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            • #7
              LEE CHOKED UNDER PRESSURE

              while he may have had his moments of glory, once the union got organized and the pressure was on Lee choked. all you need to do is look at Lee's insane move called "picket's charge" at gettysburg. what an act of desperation and folly. had zero chance of accomplishing anything but getting good men slaughtered. i'll take Grant any day over Lee. so while i am not answering your question directly what i am suggesting is study Grant...not Lee.
              Publisher
              Armchair General Magazine
              Weider History Group

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              • #8
                I read a book called 'Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant' that put forth the theory that Longstreet was made a scapegoat after the war for many of the problems that were actually Lee's fault. Longstreet worked for various Republican governments after the war so he became a easy target for bitter Southerners.
                "There is no great genius without some touch of madness."

                Seneca (5 BC - 65 AD)

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