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Any read all of J.R.R. Tolkiein's Middle earth books?

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  • Any read all of J.R.R. Tolkiein's Middle earth books?

    People usually read the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings but in the universe of J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle earth, that is just a sliver of the history behind it. I've tried to read The Silmarillion a couple of times, the first was hard and the second I learned a lot more after reading the Hobbit and LOTR's more meticulously. I discovered the 12 volume The History of Middle-earth and was interested but since it's mostly and analysis by Christopher Tokien it didn't really appeal to me. Has anyone read all of it? Are there are other published works by J.R.R. related to Middle earth worth reading? I wanted to know if anyone has read all books in Tolkien's Middle earth.
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  • #2
    I too have read with relish, the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings trilogy. I couldn't get into the Silmarillion or the forgotten tails, though I found this book to be an excellent tome that gets you into the heart of Tolkien's fantastic world. Worth every penny!

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tolkien-Best.../dp/0517120771

    Paul
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    Or with a bauble or medal
    Can win mans heart for you;
    And many a blessing know to stew
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    Give honour to the dainty Corse,
    The Pixie is a little shite.

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    • #3
      I have read the Trilogy and the Hobbit, as well as the Silmarillion--which I don't actually consider a pure JRR work however.

      I tried reading Children of Hurin but about three pages in gave up on it. Not a fan of Christopher Tolkien.
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      • #4
        The Silmarillion is his best book in my opinion. So many well crafted tales.
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        • #5
          I found a pile of book fragments to be very frustrating.
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          • #6
            Some time ago after re-reading The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, I read The Silmarillion and every other posthumous Tolkien publication I could find. Had I to do it over again, I would have stopped after The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings; the entertainment value just wasn't there with the later works.
            "I have never known a combat soldier who did not show a residue of war." --Sergeant Ed Stewart, 84th Division, US Army, WWII

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Greybriar View Post
              Some time ago after re-reading The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, I read The Silmarillion and every other posthumous Tolkien publication I could find. Had I to do it over again, I would have stopped after The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings; the entertainment value just wasn't there with the later works.
              They were his notes for an entire world, and the mortar for that pile of bricks was still in his head when he died. It's rather like reading a pile of newspaper clipping with no dates. You know something happened, but you don't have the larger context.
              Hyperwar: World War II on the World Wide Web
              Hyperwar, Whats New
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              The best place in the world to "work".

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              • #8
                Hi

                Back in youth I and my friends were so into Tolkien, that we became very
                Proficent in writing in Elvish, and I can still write my name in it lol

                Regards

                Andy H
                "You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life." Churchill

                "I'm no reactionary.Christ on the Mountain! I'm as idealistic as Hell" Eisenhower

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post
                  I too have read with relish, the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings trilogy. I couldn't get into the Silmarillion or the forgotten tails, though I found this book to be an excellent tome that gets you into the heart of Tolkien's fantastic world. Worth every penny!

                  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tolkien-Best.../dp/0517120771

                  Paul
                  I have this, and it's awesome .
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                  • #10
                    Yes, yes, and yes. I would start with the Hobbit, then LoTR, then the Silmarillion if you're up for it. The others aren't so significant. The Silmarillion can be a bear at parts, but it really is pretty cool once you get into it. Try listening to it on tape (or youtube, the voice acting is quite good). It makes the book that much more epic.


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by OpanaPointer View Post
                      Originally posted by Greybriar View Post
                      Some time ago after re-reading The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, I read The Silmarillion and every other posthumous Tolkien publication I could find. Had I to do it over again, I would have stopped after The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings; the entertainment value just wasn't there with the later works.
                      They were his notes for an entire world, and the mortar for that pile of bricks was still in his head when he died. It's rather like reading a pile of newspaper clipping with no dates. You know something happened, but you don't have the larger context.
                      Exactly.
                      "I have never known a combat soldier who did not show a residue of war." --Sergeant Ed Stewart, 84th Division, US Army, WWII

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                      • #12
                        Not very interesting to read about all those elves ***holes. Stuff about dwarfs and easterlings could be far more interesting.
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                        • #13
                          I've read

                          The Hobbit
                          Lord of the Rings
                          Silmarillion

                          The Book of Lost Tales I
                          The Book of Lost Tales II
                          The Lays of Beleriand
                          The Shaping of Middle Earth

                          Also studied Tolkien's work on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight for a medieval literature course.

                          The Lays of Beleriand is my favourite so far. You can see some allusions to The Ley of Leithian in the LOTR movies.

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                          • #14
                            There is a book?

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                            • #15
                              I have read all of Tolkien's works, including the Silmarillion. One book not written by Tolkien that I found to be very helpful was an "atlas" of Middle Earth. I just checked Amazon and there must be 10 similar works available. The author notes that Tolkien was consistent throughout in accurately taking terrain, etc. into how far characters moved in a given time frame, even phases of the moon were consistent. I took a Tolkien class in college English and was surprised at how many saw Gandalf as being a "Christ" like character\.
                              Lance W.

                              Peace through superior firepower.

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