Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

10 Good Books On War

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by GCoyote View Post
    I couldn't find the original article (for free ) but I did locate this follow on piece:

    S. L. A. Marshall’s Men Against Fire:
    New Evidence Regarding Fire Ratios
    by
    JOHN WHITECLAY CHAMBERS II
    2003

    http://strategicstudiesinstitute.arm...n/chambers.pdf

    Added to my heap-o-reading.
    Great find, I've added it to my vertical file. I recall infantry officers from Vietnam telling one of their greatest problems was fire discipline. Soldiers would put their M-16's on 'rock and roll' and burn through their magazines of ammo, needing resupply. Kinda jives with the Brennan's experience in Korea.

    Leave a comment:


  • GCoyote
    replied
    Related material

    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    I don't know of any study that has tried to replicate Marshall's interview collection. I think like the camera "limelight", few would be honest in admitting sitting out a firefight.
    I couldn't find the original article (for free ) but I did locate this follow on piece:

    S. L. A. Marshall’s Men Against Fire:
    New Evidence Regarding Fire Ratios
    by
    JOHN WHITECLAY CHAMBERS II
    2003

    http://strategicstudiesinstitute.arm...n/chambers.pdf

    Added to my heap-o-reading.

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by Lance Williams View Post
    I read "Flashman at the Charge" and "Flashman in the Great Game" this past week. I learned more about that period than any "history" books I'd read on the subject.
    PS You have nine more books in the series to enjoy.

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by Lance Williams View Post
    I read "Flashman at the Charge" and "Flashman in the Great Game" this past week. I learned more about that period than any "history" books I'd read on the subject.
    I enjoy reading his footnotes for the leads in his source material which go back to contemporaries of the period which allows Fraser to pick up the nifty tidbits.

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by GCoyote View Post
    I'd heard that but not seen the citation before, thanks. The obvious next question of course would be, do we have some way to address this issue using all of the data we can now collect from our deployed units?

    If you watch Restrepo, for instance, not everyone fires during every engagement. This may be a limitation of knowing only what the camera happens to catch, or it might accurately reflect the fog-of-war at the small unit level.
    I don't know of any study that has tried to replicate Marshall's interview collection. I think like the camera "limelight", few would be honest in admitting sitting out a firefight.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lance Williams
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    Not really that strange, look at how much military history is in Fraser's Flashman series, also fictional pieces on wars around the globe.
    I read "Flashman at the Charge" and "Flashman in the Great Game" this past week. I learned more about that period than any "history" books I'd read on the subject.

    Leave a comment:


  • GCoyote
    replied
    I'd heard that but not seen the citation before, thanks. The obvious next question of course would be, do we have some way to address this issue using all of the data we can now collect from our deployed units?

    If you watch Restrepo, for instance, not everyone fires during every engagement. This may be a limitation of knowing only what the camera happens to catch, or it might accurately reflect the fog-of-war at the small unit level.

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by 101combatvet View Post
    I thought Men Against Fire was pretty good. That book could apply to any war in my opinion.
    The military historian, Roger Spiller, studied Marshall's papers and could find no statistical data to support his contentions on the percentages fired by soldiers. His methodology and conclusions are suspect.

    Spiller's article, "S.L. A. Marshall and the Ratio of Fire," was in the RUSI Journal Winter 1988. Quotes from article:
    "Citing evidence he had gleaned from interviews with rifle companies fresh from combat, Marshall concluded that one soldier in four fired his weapon while in contact with the enemy...."

    "The 'ratio of fire' between those soldiers who used their weapons and those who did not, consummated Marshall's argument in Men Against Fire."

    "The 'systematic collection of data' that made Marshall's ratio of fire so authoritative appears to have been an invention."

    Leave a comment:


  • BELGRAVE
    replied
    Originally posted by Lance Williams View Post
    I'd have to second that, I'm on my sixth Flashman volume in the last month, and it has only made me look deeper into the history that he "stumbles" into. It is very much the same way with O'Brien, Lambdin, Stockwin, and Forrester that got me interested in the Age of Fighting Sail, or Cornwell getting me interested in the Napoleonic War on the peninsula. I guess that is how I judge historical fiction, does it make me want to know more about the actual history of the period.
    Flashy, or, indeed, anything written by George McDonald Fraser is well worth a read: but let's not forget the classics such as The Art of War, by Sun Tzu.

    Leave a comment:


  • 101combatvet
    replied
    I thought Men Against Fire was pretty good. That book could apply to any war in my opinion.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lance Williams
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    Not really that strange, look at how much military history is in Fraser's Flashman series, also fictional pieces on wars around the globe.
    I'd have to second that, I'm on my sixth Flashman volume in the last month, and it has only made me look deeper into the history that he "stumbles" into. It is very much the same way with O'Brien, Lambdin, Stockwin, and Forrester that got me interested in the Age of Fighting Sail, or Cornwell getting me interested in the Napoleonic War on the peninsula. I guess that is how I judge historical fiction, does it make me want to know more about the actual history of the period.
    Last edited by Lance Williams; 25 Jul 14, 11:22.

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by Major Sennef View Post
    One of the strangest but most profound books on warfare I've read is: an Instinct for War by Roger J. Spiller.

    Thirteen narratives, covering Han China via Thucydides and Machiavelli to the middle futrue of the 21 centruy, all written in a distinct and style typical for the period covered all conveying insights on warfare as the original author could have stated it.
    Not really that strange, look at how much military history is in Fraser's Flashman series, also fictional pieces on wars around the globe.

    Leave a comment:


  • T. A. Gardner
    replied
    Originally posted by ole timer View Post
    Have any members read any of the above books ? Give us your thoughts on the ones you have read....
    Monsarrat's The Cruel Sea and HMS Scarborough Will Enter Harbor are classic sea tales. He was a RNVR officer and served on a Flower class corvette in WW 2 so the writing is authentic.

    Leave a comment:


  • GCoyote
    replied
    As my interests tend toward tactics and technology one of my favorites is "War Made New" by Max Boot. There is a difference between adopting a new technology and adapting to it. The later is often more important.

    Leave a comment:


  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    An Instinct for War

    One of the strangest but most profound books on warfare I've read is: an Instinct for War by Roger J. Spiller.

    Thirteen narratives, covering Han China via Thucydides and Machiavelli to the middle futrue of the 21 centruy, all written in a distinct and style typical for the period covered all conveying insights on warfare as the original author could have stated it.

    Leave a comment:

Latest Topics

Collapse

Working...
X