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Writers who can take big risks and sell wery well.

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  • Writers who can take big risks and sell wery well.

    Any writers out there writing historical fiction who can write about really rarely mentioned exotic parts of history and still sell well?

    Like let's say the succession wars after Alexander or the Sogdians, or Scythians or the Crimean colonies of Greece.
    texjoy861 from youtube:

    "Aaron Sorkin writes like a limousine liberal version of Ayn Rand. None of the characters sound remotely like human beings."

  • #2
    Originally posted by Emmajin Beki View Post
    Any writers out there writing historical fiction who can write about really rarely mentioned exotic parts of history and still sell well?

    Like let's say the succession wars after Alexander or the Sogdians, or Scythians or the Crimean colonies of Greece.
    BY 'exotic', do you mean 'boring'?

    The trouble with writing for those periods is that so few people understand the actual history involved. You need to stick with periods where you have some reader appeal.

    IIRC, L. Sprague DeCamp did write a short story 'The Scientific Method' which took place in the early days of Greece.
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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    • #3
      It depends more on whether they can spell wery well.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
        BY 'exotic', do you mean 'boring'?

        The trouble with writing for those periods is that so few people understand the actual history involved. You need to stick with periods where you have some reader appeal.

        IIRC, L. Sprague DeCamp did write a short story 'The Scientific Method' which took place in the early days of Greece.
        Every period is interesting to someone and good writers can make any setting interesting.
        texjoy861 from youtube:

        "Aaron Sorkin writes like a limousine liberal version of Ayn Rand. None of the characters sound remotely like human beings."

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        • #5
          A diadochi era book would be excellent. I love the period. There was a fiction book on the Punic Wars.
          First Counsul Maleketh of Jonov

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Emmajin Beki View Post
            Every period is interesting to someone and good writers can make any setting interesting.
            True, but the thing with alternate history is that if the reader knows nothing of the actual history much of the effect of the story is lost.

            This is why writers of such fiction tend to stick to well-known events such as WW2 or the ACW.
            Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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            • #7
              True, but the thing with alternate history is that if the reader knows nothing of the actual history much of the effect of the story is lost.
              They can look things up along the way or after they finished the book.
              texjoy861 from youtube:

              "Aaron Sorkin writes like a limousine liberal version of Ayn Rand. None of the characters sound remotely like human beings."

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              • #8
                A really good writer can make anything interesting.
                Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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