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  • SmackUm
    replied
    James Mcgill

    James McGill (of Montreal) by Stanley Brice Frost

    James Mcgill is well known as the founder of McGill University, but the rest of his accomplishments remain little known.
    This biography reveals the facinating story of his life's journey from Scotland to America & Canada.
    During his life he was a fur trader,merchant,public servant & colonel in the militia during the War of 1812.
    In Canada, James McGill, alerted by his private sources, was the first to receive and send to the governor general reliable information that the Provinces were at war. His letter dated 24 June, 1812 8 A.M. was brief.
    McGill's greatest concern was the preparation of the militia. During the war of 1812 he commanded the militia that defended Montreal, helping to foil the United States attempts to annex Canada.

    McGill as chairman of the Executive Council imediately called a meeting in Montreal to mobilize the militia. McGill and other fur traders had already written Prevost urging the full use of the trader's services. Having been a fur trader himself he was well aquainted with the members of the North West Company. McGill was influential in the mobilization of The Canadian Corps of Voyageurs but the Montreal Militia continued to be his greatest concern.
    During the conflict he was raised to acting rank of brigadier general and given command of all of the militia forces of the city including the Canadian Fencibles & Canadien Voltigeurs.
    It was a striking confirmation of respect from Sir George Prevost to coin Milton's phrase, he was now in Montreal "our Chief of Men".
    He passed away on the 19 December 1813 after a short illness successful in the defence of his city.

    https://www.amazon.ca/James-McGill-M.../dp/0773512977

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  • Nick the Noodle
    replied


    If I had read this a couple of decades ago, I would have believed it.

    There is no reason why the Authors candidate would have achieved such fame as both the current and past image of Arthur inspires.

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  • Hida Akechi
    replied
    Just picked up the leather cover, Barnes and Noble exclusive edition of Dune to read while I'm on vacation next week. Looking forward to it, I haven't read it since I was in elementary school.

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    I'll have to get Sears' Lincoln on my list.

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  • R. Evans
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    If you have read T. Harry Williams' "Lincoln and His Generals", I would be interested in your comparison.
    I haven't. I'll have to get on my Amazon wishlist.

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
    About 100 pages in and as usual with Sears' work, it's excellent.

    If you have read T. Harry Williams' "Lincoln and His Generals", I would be interested in your comparison.

    Leave a comment:


  • R. Evans
    replied
    About 100 pages in and as usual with Sears' work, it's excellent.

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  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    I enjoy linking history with literature and good movie arts.
    You're definitely not alone here

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  • CarpeDiem
    replied


    Kampfgruppe Walther and Panzerbrigade 107
    Contains some sample pages.
    Extremely detailed and adds to the historical record and also looks to correct some older histories like Kershaw's It Never Snows in September

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Just finished Robert Harris's The Fatherland. Good mystery storyline within an alternative history situation. Very impressive for a first novel. It complements the movie Conspiracy about the Wansee Conference with Branagh as Heydrich and Tucci as Eichmann, and both the book and movie reinforce Hannah Ardent's observation from the Eichmann trial in Jerusalem on the 'banality of evil'.

    I enjoy linking history with literature and good movie arts.
    Last edited by R.N. Armstrong; 04 Feb 18, 12:21.

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  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Started

    Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare

    by Giles Milton.

    Details are well researched and narrated. This goes a bit at the expense of his objectivity as the author creates the impression that his subject can be safely considered the most important part of the British war effort
    Still chapters are entertaining and informative

    Last edited by Colonel Sennef; 05 Feb 18, 14:06.

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  • warmoviebuff
    replied
    Just finished "Men of War" by Alexander Rose. It is like the American version of Keegan's "Face of Battle". Rose covers Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima. Excellent read.

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Always glad to hear officers reading and using military history. I found reading military history that rhymed with my situations gave me a wider repertoire of options for decisions and courses of action.

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  • Tsar
    replied
    The Murrow boys
    Pioneers on the front lines of broadcast journalism.

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  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
    However, I ordered and received via Amazon 27 Articles written by Lawrence, as guidance to British officers dealing with Arabs. Starting to read it this weekend.
    Working in the region I find "27 Articles" still relevant

    Leave a comment:

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