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  • We Were Soldiers Once... And Young by Lt. General Hal Moore (Ret.) and Joseph Galloway

    I really like this book so far it's tied with Black Hawk Down as one of my favorite books.
    Last edited by Gidia; 26 Mar 09, 21:06.
    2013 I'm going into West Point if it kills me. 2017 (or 2012 depending on West Point) I'm joining the Airborne if it kills me and it actually might.

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    • I just received The German General Staff by General von Falkenhayn on loan from my wife's college library. I am still pursuing information on General Hermann Francois.
      If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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      • I am reading Werhmacht 1939-1945.

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        • I bought a bunch of books over the past couple of weeks. So far I've read A General Speaks Out, overall that was a good read though it could have been a lot more detailed.

          Right now I'm currently reading The Mission, the Men, and Me. So far I love this book, it's full of great insights and life lessons.

          Next up is No True Glory and then Inside Delta Force.
          "Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."
          - Benjamin Franklin

          The new right wing: hate Muslims, preaches tolerance for Nazis.

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          • Originally posted by TactiKill J. View Post
            I bought a bunch of books over the past couple of weeks. So far I've read A General Speaks Out, overall that was a good read though it could have been a lot more detailed.

            Right now I'm currently reading The Mission, the Men, and Me. So far I love this book, it's full of great insights and life lessons.

            Next up is No True Glory and then Inside Delta Force.
            Have you read About Face yet? If not, you should. It seems to fit in with the above books.
            If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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            • Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
              Reading the novel, "Child 44". Chillingly precise look into post-WWII Russia under Stalin through the eyes of an MGB officer. It's the author's first novel and he can already tell a compelling story with graphic writing techniques--realistic scenes with insights that will not easily slip your memory. Anyone know what camphor oil does in the human bloodstream?
              I do know now
              BoRG

              You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

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              • Pilsudski, yes mate I know, just me trying to be funny!
                'By Horse by Tram'.


                I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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                • Just finished reading "The Coldest War" by James Brady. Excellent, one of the few books I've read about Korea.

                  Now I'm reading "The Proud Bastards" by E. Micheal Helms, switching the subject to Vietnam.

                  Here's photos of both of them:
                  Attached Files
                  Best regards, Hufflepuff

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                  • Originally posted by Freightshaker View Post
                    Have you read About Face yet? If not, you should. It seems to fit in with the above books.
                    Nope, it does look like something I would be interested in too so I'll definitely be picking that up once I get through the ones I already have. Thanks for the recommendation.
                    "Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."
                    - Benjamin Franklin

                    The new right wing: hate Muslims, preaches tolerance for Nazis.

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                    • "Seeds of Discontent: The Deep Roots of the American Revolution 1650-1750" by J. Revell Carr and "Winning Modern War" by Gen. Wesley Clark
                      The art of war is simple enough. Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike him as hard as you can, and keep moving on.
                      Ulysses S. Grant

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                      • "Treason" by Anne Coulter. Excellent book. All of her books are.
                        "I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical."
                        -Thomas Jefferson

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                        • I read the works of known dopers...

                          A Brave New World & A Brave New World Revisted

                          By Aldous Huxley
                          "This life..., you know, "the life." Youíre not gonna get any medals, kid. This is not a hero business; you donít shoot people from a mile a way. You gotta stand right next to them... blow their heads off."

                          BoRG

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                          • I have far too many stacked up but am at least on vacation from Wednesday for two weeks. I have a few books in France to go through. Also of US interest Antietam (McPherson), 1776 (McCullough), Antiquity (Cantor), Team of Rivals (Goodwin).

                            I'll let you know what I think when I get back the 15th, if someone reminds me as I do not post here often.
                            Tactics are based on Weapons... Strategy on Movement... and Movement on Supply.
                            (J. F. C. Fuller 1878-1966)

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                            • I am presently re-reading Correlli Barnett's Engage the Enemy More Closely: The Royal Navy in the Second World War and a damned good read it is, too! I am something of a Correlli Barnett fan, as some of my posts on this board may indicate. Barnett is unremittingly rational and the nationalist, propagandist, and emotional myths of yesteryear have not the slightest influence on him or on the position he takes. Indeed, I find him refreshingly frank and objective: he enumerates the faults and foibles of the British govt and the British armed forces before and during the War; but equally, he enumerates their strengths and successes. Barnett calls a spade a spade: his position and the reasons why he has adopted it are always clear; and whether one agrees with him or not, there is no mistaking the clarity and rigour of his thought and the lucidity of his writing.
                              Last edited by Leander048; 30 Mar 09, 11:11.

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                              • the Gulag Archipelago, finally, but just volume one started on audio books, a bit dreary but I can dig it.
                                I often think how much easier the world would have been to manage if Herr Hitler and Signor Mussolini had been at Oxford. Lord Halifax

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