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  • Originally posted by macfrank View Post
    LCM1,

    It is written by Max Hastings, who i.e. interviewed Lord Carrington. He wrote another book just a year later about the end of the war in the Pacific. I like his "Overlord" of these three the most, a masterpiece.

    Frank
    You are correct. The Pacific book in the US in known as Retribution, however I've heard it referred to by European members as Nemesis. I have it and it's a good read but I disagree with some of his conclusions. He really slags Australia's contribution to the Pacific War in the last year.
    Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

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    • Have you tried Kershaws Frank? I'm sure it has the edge over Hastings!!
      Last edited by lcm1; 18 Mar 09, 00:02.
      'By Horse by Tram'.


      I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
      " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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      • How Rome Fell: Death of a Superpower, by Adrian Goldsworthy, author of Caesar. I'll be doing a review on it.



        Regards,
        Alex

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        • Originally posted by CatholicCrusade View Post
          How Rome Fell: Death of a Superpower, by Adrian Goldsworthy, author of Caesar. I'll be doing a review on it.



          Regards,
          Alex
          That seems relevant to current events...
          If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Freightshaker View Post
            That seems relevant to current events...
            How so? The use of mercenaries? Ie Blackwater?

            Sorry, I couldn't resist.

            But that's for another forum.
            Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

            Comment


            • Situation reports from the Soviet secret police to the Politburo for the year 1922.


              Comment


              • Originally posted by skoblin View Post
                Situation reports from the Soviet secret police to the Politburo for the year 1922.

                Must be riveting stuff!!
                If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks,glory would become the prey of mediocre minds. Napoleon

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                • Originally posted by Legate View Post
                  Must be riveting stuff!!
                  Hey, it's got to be better than his last entry. Some sort of training manual on Renault tanks. In Russian!!
                  Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

                  Comment


                  • Hi R.Evans, I am inclined to feel that Max Hastings is inclined to let his personal oppinions take over on occasions!!
                    'By Horse by Tram'.


                    I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                    " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by lcm1 View Post
                      Hi R.Evans, I am inclined to feel that Max Hastings is inclined to let his personal oppinions take over on occasions!!
                      Yes, I've noticed that also. In "Armageddon" you get the feeling that the Western Allies were incompetent bunglers and in "Retribution" (Nemesis), the same for the Commonwealth forces. With th possible exception of Slim, he denigrates the Commonwealth's contribution to the defeat of Japan. That said, he does write in a very engaging style. And whether or not we agree with him, he does seem to make us think and do more research to prove him wrong.
                      Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
                        Hey, it's got to be better than his last entry. Some sort of training manual on Renault tanks. In Russian!!
                        Yes...well...the Russian Renault manual was pretty dry, but I am now waiting for a copy of the assessment manual for the T-18 tank. Should be more interesting as it contains information on the evaluation of the tank by the RKKA staffers, and not just a list and description of parts like the previous manual.

                        Comment


                        • America and Rome--Similar Yet Different

                          Originally posted by Freightshaker View Post
                          That seems relevant to current events...
                          Yes, in many respects, the book is; yet Goldsworthy makes it clear, both in the Preface and Introduction and in his closing analysis, that while America in many respects resembles ancient Rome, esp. during the late Imperial era, the similarities are not as deep as many have postulated or suggested.

                          For example, I don't think that most Americans would regard the prospect of a high-ranking Army general--say Petraeus, for instance--taking command of the majority of the U.S. military, and then proclaiming himself president and marching on Washington, killing any and all Democrats and other supporters of Barack Obama he could find, and at the same time wooing the GOP. This is a scenario that occurred many times in the later history of Rome, from the 2nd and 3rd centuries onwards. A scenario more reminiscent of early Imperial Rome would be of an angry and defeated John McCain taking control of the military and usurping Obama; this is equally unlikely. Goldsworthy points this out in the Preface, which was written before last year's Presidential Election took place.

                          Yet things like this occurred in ancient Rome, and rather frequently from the second century A.D. to the fall of the Western Empire in 476 A.D. Take the rebellion of the Gordians against Maximinus Thrax, for example, which followed the murder of Emperor Alexander Severus by Thrax.

                          Anyway, I'm about 1/3 of the way through it right now, and so far it's been good, although at spots a bit disjointed IMHO. I know I'll enjoy writing the review of it for ACG.

                          Regards,
                          Alex
                          Last edited by Alexander; 21 Mar 09, 20:50.

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                          • I always seem to have two books on the go, one to stimulate the brain, the other brain candy. Currently:



                            and

                            Amateurs study tactics, Professionals study logistics.

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                            • Originally posted by Roadkiller View Post
                              I always seem to have two books on the go, one to stimulate the brain, the other brain candy. Currently:



                              and

                              I always try to do the same thing: one serious, purely nonfiction book, and another lighter book, usually historical fiction or some sort of contemporary action adventure. It's a good idea. Kind of helps to keep you sane sometimes, IMHO; nonfiction is great, but too much of it, like any good things, makes you...

                              Lately I've been pairing up W.E.B. Griffin's Presidential Agent series with the nonfiction books I've been reading; but since I have to books to read and review, I've had to put those on hold.

                              Regards,
                              Alex

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by CatholicCrusade View Post
                                Yes, in many respects, the book is; yet Goldsworthy makes it clear, both in the Preface and Introduction and in his closing analysis, that while America in many respects resembles ancient Rome, esp. during the late Imperial era, the similarities are not as deep as many have postulated or suggested.

                                For example, I don't think that most Americans would regard the prospect of a high-ranking Army general--say Petraeus, for instance--taking command of the majority of the U.S. military, and then proclaiming himself president and marching on Washington, killing any and all Democrats and other supporters of Barack Obama he could find, and at the same time wooing the GOP. This is a scenario that occurred many times in the later history of Rome, from the 2nd and 3rd centuries onwards. A scenario more reminiscent of early Imperial Rome would be of an angry and defeated John McCain taking control of the military and usurping Obama; this is equally unlikely. Goldsworthy points this out in the Preface, which was written before last year's Presidential Election took place.

                                Yet things like this occurred in ancient Rome, and rather frequently from the second century A.D. to the fall of the Western Empire in 476 A.D. Take the rebellion of the Gordians against Maximinus Thrax, for example, which followed the murder of Emperor Alexander Severus by Thrax.

                                Anyway, I'm about 1/3 of the way through it right now, and so far it's been good, although at spots a bit disjointed IMHO. I know I'll enjoy writing the review of it for ACG.

                                Regards,
                                Alex
                                This not only happened during the Principate but also occurred several times during the late Republic i.e. Marius, Sulla, Caesar, etc.
                                "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

                                Homer


                                BoRG

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