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  • Captain Alatriste by Arturo Perez-Reverte.

    "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

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    • Originally posted by Wolfe Tone View Post
      Ace book! My favorite on the Normandy Campaign.
      Suggestion, try 'D Day. Piercing the Atlantic Wall.' By Robert Kershaw and I will try yours!!
      'By Horse by Tram'.


      I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
      " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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      • The Cash Nexus by Niall Ferguson
        If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks,glory would become the prey of mediocre minds. Napoleon

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        • Girl with the dragon tattoo

          This thriller is an absolute hype in Scandinavia and rightly becoming one in Europe too. The original Swedish title: 'Men who hate women' by Stieg Larsson, is intriguing and invited me to dive right in and stay awake reading but strangely this title is not used not used in the English translation

          I'm not going to retell the story, but it has all classic ingredients that constitute a superior thriller. Strong plot (cold case of murder in a closed community) spiced up with maps to go over, unorthodox sleuth couple, codes to be broken, missing girls, religious motives and bible quotes, with cruel people with a hint of Nazi sympathies and sex thrown in for good measure
          BoRG

          You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

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          • I am currently reading a masters thesis about General Francois' actions at Tannenberg. He's quite the character and my favorite WW1 general.
            If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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            • Volume 2 of Shelby Foot's Civil War Narrative.
              I often think how much easier the world would have been to manage if Herr Hitler and Signor Mussolini had been at Oxford. Lord Halifax

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              • Originally posted by Freightshaker View Post
                I am currently reading a masters thesis about General Francois' actions at Tannenberg. He's quite the character and my favorite WW1 general.
                That would be the one we were discussing in the WW1 thread?
                BoRG

                You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by MajorSennef View Post
                  That would be the one we were discussing in the WW1 thread?
                  Yes.

                  It's not too bad, although I disagree on some on his assumptions.
                  If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by lcm1 View Post
                    Suggestion, try 'D Day. Piercing the Atlantic Wall.' By Robert Kershaw and I will try yours!!
                    I am half way through and so far it is a good read, (How Jerry were cluster f*****d on the night of the fifth & morning of the 6th) the snapshot eyewitness accounts with no hyperbole thrown in, has been well selected by the author, and is not bogged down with detail but does (so far) give a good description of the operation and is told at a cracking pace.
                    What helps is the line diagrams of Omaha beach etc, 'the enfilading fire that would have greeted the poor yanks as they "debussed" from their landing craft' and the assault on point d' hoc, Finding the guns in a small valley where they were disabled with thermite bombs & anything else they had to hand. Utah was a picnic compared with the slaughter just down the coast at Omaha, and was consolidated immediately and the troops went on to established a 7-mile by 7-mile foothold.
                    What the book shows is that the Para drops, though scattered, ( and seen as a failure by some) were an asset that caused great confusion behind the German lines, which succeeded in “pulling” some German assets away from the beaches, whilst at the same time prevented any type of coordinated counter attack on the beachhead during those critical hours of the sixth.

                    A good book 'so far'

                    Now for the British & Canadian beaches...

                    Paul
                    ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                    All human ills he can subdue,
                    Or with a bauble or medal
                    Can win mans heart for you;
                    And many a blessing know to stew
                    To make a megloamaniac bright;
                    Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                    The Pixie is a little shite.

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                    • I am now in the throws of reading Max Hastings 'D Day and the battle for Normandy' quite good and excellant Photo's but have the feeling it is not going to match up to the style of Robert Kershaw's book!!
                      'By Horse by Tram'.


                      I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                      " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by lcm1 View Post
                        I am now in the throws of reading Max Hastings 'D Day and the battle for Normandy' quite good and excellant Photo's but have the feeling it is not going to match up to the style of Robert Kershaw's book!!
                        I have his Armageddon on the read pile. That pile is growing...
                        If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by lcm1 View Post
                          I am now in the throws of reading Max Hastings 'D Day and the battle for Normandy' quite good and excellant Photo's but have the feeling it is not going to match up to the style of Robert Kershaw's book!!
                          Your feelings will be correct; apart from the telling of the operation it's self, he dives headlong into trying to pigeonhole the fighting abilities and leadership styles of each nation. Do not let that put you off though, as it is still a good read and Hastings book does give a different angle and controversy on the Operation.

                          Paul
                          ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                          All human ills he can subdue,
                          Or with a bauble or medal
                          Can win mans heart for you;
                          And many a blessing know to stew
                          To make a megloamaniac bright;
                          Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                          The Pixie is a little shite.

                          Comment


                          • Is Armageddon by Hastings or Kershaw?
                            'By Horse by Tram'.


                            I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                            " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                            Comment


                            • LCM1,

                              It is written by Max Hastings, who i.e. interviewed Lord Carrington. He wrote another book just a year later about the end of the war in the Pacific. I like his "Overlord" of these three the most, a masterpiece.

                              Frank

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by lcm1 View Post
                                Is Armageddon by Hastings or Kershaw?
                                Sorry, I didn't specify .

                                Thanks Mac!
                                If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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