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  • General_Jacke
    replied
    Just finished devil’s due of the destroyermen series

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  • Legate
    replied
    Originally posted by Cheetah772 View Post
    Been reading Sean Naylor's Relentless Strike: Secret History of JSOC, and Mark Morris' Norman Conquest. Both are good books.
    Morris is a great one, I really enjoyed his bio of Edward I.

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  • OttoHarkaman
    replied
    The Classical Art of Command: Eight Greek Generals Who Shaped the History of Warfare by Joseph Roisman
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    The Classical Age of Greece produced some of history's best-known generals and commanders. They include the Spartan king Leonidas, who embodied his countrymen's heroic ethos in the battle of Thermopylae; the Athenian leader Themistocles, credited as the architect of Athens' naval power and of the Greek victory over the Persians; the famous democratic leader, Pericles, who prepared Athens and directed its conflict with Sparta, known as the Peloponnesian War; the Athenian general Demosthenes, who deviated from contemporary conventions of warfare with his innovative approach; the Spartan general Lysander, who won the Peloponnesian War for Sparta; Dionysius I of Syracuse, arguably the most innovative and best skilled of the eight generals discussed in this book; and Epaminondas and Pelopidas who together transformed their city, Thebes, into an hegemonic power.

    The Art of Renaissance Warfare: From The Fall of Constantinople to the Thirty Years War by Stephen Turnbull
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    The Art of Renaissance Warfare tells the story of the knight during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries – from the great victories of Edward III and the Black Prince to the fall of Richard III on Bosworth Field.

    During this period, new technology on the battlefield posed deadly challenges for the mounted warrior; but they also stimulated change, and the knight moved with the times. Having survived the longbow devastation at Crécy, Poitiers and Agincourt, he emerged triumphant, his armor lighter and more effective, and his military skills indispensable.

    This was the great age of the orders of chivalry and the freemasonry of arms that bound together comrades and adversaries in a tight international military caste. Men such as Bertrand du Guesclin and Sir John Chandos loom large in the pages of this book – bold leaders and brave warriors, imbued with these traditions of chivalry and knighthood. How their heroic endeavors and the knightly code of conduct could be reconciled with the indiscriminate carnage of the 'chevauchée' and the depredations of the 'free companies' is one of the principal themes of this informative and entertaining book.
    Attached Files

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  • 101combatvet
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post

    Kanon raises that point. Jewess character states the Air Raid sirens were used to mask the nighttime knocking on doors, screams, and hollering as they pulled people from the Jewish ghetto.
    The Italians seemed to blame it all on the Germans as if they had a pistol pointed at them; I call it cowardice behavior as with much of what they did. Italian Jews were worthy of government protection and had the Italians been masculine they could have disobeyed German policy.

    Funny how the Italian anti-Jewish movement predates that of the German one, they have a lot of nerve.

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  • Cheetah772
    replied
    Been reading Sean Naylor's Relentless Strike: Secret History of JSOC, and Mark Morris' Norman Conquest. Both are good books.
    Last edited by Cheetah772; 14 Jun 18, 19:51.

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by 101combatvet View Post

    Really, I did a research paper on Italian Jews in Italy during WW2. Big cover-up by the post-war Italians.
    Kanon raises that point. Jewess character states the Air Raid sirens were used to mask the nighttime knocking on doors, screams, and hollering as they pulled people from the Jewish ghetto.

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  • 101combatvet
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    Now reading Kanon's "Alibi". It's historical background is what happened to the Jews in Venice during WWII.
    Really, I did a research paper on Italian Jews in Italy during WW2. Big cover-up by the post-war Italians.

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Now reading Kanon's "Alibi". It's historical background is what happened to the Jews in Venice during WWII.

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  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    For those who enjoyed Robert Harris novels, I believe you will like Joseph Kanon who has written The Prodigal Spy, Los Alamos, The Good German and others within a historical context for his mysteries.
    I prefer the older 'The expendable spy' by Jack D Hunter (who later wrote ' The Blue Max'). It starts with a young US intelligence officer parachuted into Germany in the last days of the 3rd Reich who initially finds himself infiltrating a werewolf operation (which is not all it seems to be). Hunter was originally a young US intelligence officer parachuted into Germany in the last days of the 3rd Reich who found himself.infiltrating a werewolf operation set up. I won't spoil it for new readers but it is more complex rthan that. Hunter later worked for the CIA.

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    For those who enjoyed Robert Harris novels, I believe you will like Joseph Kanon who has written The Prodigal Spy, Los Alamos, The Good German and others within a historical context for his mysteries.

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  • Gorque
    replied
    I just finished reading Hillbilly Anthology by J.D. Vance. An insightful look about growing up in Eastern Kentucky and Southern Ohio.

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  • Arthwys
    replied
    Currently reading Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst by Robert Sapolsky.
    A very interesting dive into Human behaviour and the Neuroscience and Neurochemistry involved in How we respond, and what we respond to:

    https://www.amazon.ca/Behave-Biology.../dp/1594205078

    Leave a comment:


  • Cheetah772
    replied
    Not a military history book but very insightful, Arthur Herman's 1917: Lenin, Wilson, and the Birth of the New World Order.

    I didn't realize there were so many missed opportunities to turn Russia into a more stable democracy with support from Wilson. Kerensky also underestimated his political opponents like Lenin on his left, focusing his energy on neutralizing the others on his right.

    The book made me feel like we're repeating the history with America deeply divided and the tactics used here can be recognized from Lenin's time. A hundred years later, we haven't really learned our lessons well.

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by GCoyote View Post
    https://books.google.com/books/about...Geography.html

    I'm back in geopolitics/history mode.
    I always read Kaplan; he reads the classics and old books combined with his extensive and insightful globetrotting. In Revenge, I took notes on Rimland Thesis and Spykman--engaging thoughts and considerations.

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  • GCoyote
    replied
    The Revenge of Geography

    https://books.google.com/books/about...Geography.html

    I'm back in geopolitics/history mode.

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