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  • Originally posted by Menelaus View Post
    I've just started reading 'Cochrane - Britannia's Sea Wolf' by Donald Thomas. It's excellent, there are more incredible (but factual), exploits in it, and of a greater magnitude than in any CS Forester or Patrick O'Brian novel!
    Your letter reminds me of a book I read a while ago about the attack on St: Naizaire and it amazed me , it was like reading a Jack Higgins novel!!
    'By Horse by Tram'.


    I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
    " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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    • Champlain's Dream: The European Founding of North America by David H. Fischer

      "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

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      • Originally posted by lcm1 View Post
        Your letter reminds me of a book I read a while ago about the attack on St: Naizaire and it amazed me , it was like reading a Jack Higgins novel!!
        That was an incredible raid!

        This guy was being portrayed by the media as equal to, if not better than nelson! He captured a Spanish frigate with a sloop, raiding the coast numerous times, took on three french battleships in a sloop - and lost, overthrew imperial powers in South America, captured dozens (possibly hundreds) of prizes, took on the British Government about corruption, sailed into enemy ports to capture ships, right underneath 300 guns! And if he lost more than half a dozen men in any attack (killed or wounded) he was distraught - he normally lost one or two!
        "In Critical and baffling situations, it is always best to return to first principle and simple action." Sir Winston Churchill.

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        • I read Captured Tanks under the German Flag, Captured Weapons and Equipment of the German Wehrmacht, Captured Tanks in German Service=Small Tanks and armored Tractors 1939-1945 and besides i read Die römischen Helme aus Niedergermanien.
          Menschen hören nicht auf zu
          spielen, weil sie alt werden,
          sie werden alt weil sie aufhören zu
          spielen....
          (O. W. Holmes)

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          • Hmmm,... since my last visit here last October I think I've only managed the following books:

            "Harold, The Last Anglo-Saxon King", by Ian Walker
            "The Fall of the Roman Empire", by Peter Heather
            "Rifles, Six Years with Wellington's Legendary Sharpshooters", by Mark Urban
            "Dunkirk, Fight to the Last Man", Hugh Sebag-Montefiore
            "The Normans", by Francois Neveux
            "Eigth Army", by Robin Neillands

            Currently reading "A World Undone, The Story of the Great War, 1914-1918", by G J Meyer.

            A bit of a slow year.
            The Purist

            Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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            • finally got around to starting. Churchill, Hitler and the "Unnecessary War" by Pat Buchanan.
              I often think how much easier the world would have been to manage if Herr Hitler and Signor Mussolini had been at Oxford. Lord Halifax

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              • Originally posted by Menelaus View Post
                That was an incredible raid!

                This guy was being portrayed by the media as equal to, if not better than nelson! He captured a Spanish frigate with a sloop, raiding the coast numerous times, took on three french battleships in a sloop - and lost, overthrew imperial powers in South America, captured dozens (possibly hundreds) of prizes, took on the British Government about corruption, sailed into enemy ports to capture ships, right underneath 300 guns! And if he lost more than half a dozen men in any attack (killed or wounded) he was distraught - he normally lost one or two!
                Maybe I am being a bit thick tonight Mene: but could you enlarge on the guy you are reffering too? Wish I could remember the version that I read because I would like to have a copy to keep!
                'By Horse by Tram'.


                I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                Comment


                • Thomas Cochrane, or as his epitaph has it:

                  Earl of Dundonald, Baron Cochrane, Marquess of Maranham, Kinght Commander of the Bath, and Admiral of the Fleet:
                  Who by the confidence which his genius, his science, and extraordinary daring inspired,
                  By his heroric exertions in the cause of Freedom,
                  and his splendid services alik to his own country,
                  Greece, Brazil, Chili, and Peru,
                  Achieved a name illustrious throughout the world for courage, patriotism, and chivalry.
                  "In Critical and baffling situations, it is always best to return to first principle and simple action." Sir Winston Churchill.

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                  • and they fit all that on his gravestone?
                    Life is Expensive Bullets are cheap anything worth shooting is worth shooting twice.Me
                    I'm not lying I'm Just Improving the truth

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                    • He was buried in a state funeral inside Westminster Abbey. Government ministers were conspicuous by their absence as he'd made a lot of enemies fighting corruption.
                      His coffin was carried by two admirals, five captains and the brazilian ambassador. IIRC it was also attended by HM Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, who were among his greatest supporters.
                      A good summing up of his life is this:
                      He seemed a more human figure than Nelson, a fit companion for Sir Francis Drake, and a man whose personal courage was dazzling. He escaped the worst that his enemies might have done to him through a brilliance of improvisation and a degree of daring which was beyond anything that his opponents in battle thought possible. William Miller, watching him at moments of extreme peril in the South American wars, saw n example of sangfroid which he would remember for the rest of his life. Marryat and his companions in the Mediterranean and the Bay of Biscay delighted in the piratical gaiety and untiring impudence with which Cochrance faced the odds against him. To his men, he was not a commander but a leader. One favourite Victorian anecdote, repeated from the Naval Chronicle, described how the boat crew of the Imperieuse [his ship], facing an apparently impregnable French shore-battery, replied when Cochrane suggested they might care to postpone the attack: "No, my lord! We can do it, if you go!"
                      .....
                      There was one other name which was persistently coupled with Cochrance's, not necessarily to his own advantage as the opingion of the conteporary historian Sir Archibald Alison showed.
                      Lord Cochrance was, after the death of Nelson, the greatest naval commander of that age of glory. Equal to his great predecessor in personal gallantry, enthusiastic ardour, and devotion to his country, he was perhaps his superior in original genius, inventive power, and inexhaustible resources.
                      Last edited by Menelaus; 23 Oct 08, 11:08.
                      "In Critical and baffling situations, it is always best to return to first principle and simple action." Sir Winston Churchill.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Wolfe Tone View Post
                        Ace book! My favorite on the Normandy Campaign.
                        Better than 'The longest day'? Which is my favourite! Now in my 4th read. I must get it, who was the Author? Further to this conversation, have you read 'Invasion 44' ? by John Frayn Turner.Very good I thought. Some very interesting info; on the training of young RM recruits for landing craft crews. (Which involved me.)
                        Last edited by lcm1; 25 Oct 08, 03:43.
                        'By Horse by Tram'.


                        I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                        " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                        Comment


                        • I am reading "Guadalcanal"...again!

                          Richard B. Frank's description's of the naval action's in this area are riviting.

                          I highly recommend this book to everyone here.
                          It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather we should thank God that such men lived.-George S. Patton

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                          • Just received The Cambodian Campaign by John M. Shaw, looks like a good companion to Nolan's Into Cambodia with lots of details on the various operations

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                            • I'm reading "Hitler's Armada" by Geoff Hewitt. It's all about Operation Sealion and Great Britain's attempt to thwart Hitler's invasion plans of the UK. Excellent reading so far, but nothing that I didn't already know from reading the old Sealion thread.
                              "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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                              • America's Spartans-A history of the Marine Corp by James A. Warren.

                                The Worlds Worst Weapons-An odd quirky little book about the worst weapons ever created. Some of the weapons they list make no sense such as the Ak-47? Being one of the worst weapons ever made I think not and ideas why this book has so many odd choices in it?
                                “Come and take it!"

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