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  • Originally posted by HiredGoon View Post
    The Divided Ground: Indians, Settlers, and the Northern Borderland of the American Revolution
    Very interesting!!! Thanks for the tip, must get to reading the book soon.

    I just started " Assault pistols, rifles and submachine guns ". By, Duncan Long

    I got it second hand and it was printed in 1986, so some of the data doesnt include many of the new stuff that has come out, but it's still an ok referrence book (what you really miss, is the modern plethora of AR-15&AR-10 based guns in the multitude of calibers that firms like DPMS, RockRiverArms and Stag are putting out).

    It could have more pictures too...

    But, it was second hand and cheap, so for the price not a bad read.

    (but not that great either)...
    "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

    If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

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    • The first of my books from the Military Book Club...

      House to House
      by SSG David Bellavia

      Rumors of my demise have been greatly exaggerated... again...

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      • Originally posted by sickpup View Post
        The first of my books from the Military Book Club...

        House to House
        by SSG David Bellavia

        You are going to have to let us know how this one goes. I have been considering it myself.

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        • Originally posted by Miss.Saigon View Post
          You are going to have to let us know how this one goes. I have been considering it myself.
          If it had been written by just about anyone else, I would have probably given up on it. Not because it isn't a good book, it's just the writing style... it's overly "hooah!"/"gung-ho"/"I'm bad ass!".

          However, the book is by SSG Bellavia, and the guy was nominated for the Medal of Honor and the Distinguished Service Cross. (And, he fought in Fallujah, which is what most of the book is about). That's more than enough for me to overlook the occasional melodrama.

          The retelling of carnage in Fallujah is nicely done, but doesn't match up to the quality of some other books like Thunder Run (by David Zucchino).

          Anyhow, I'm almost done with it, and I'd certainly recommend it. It's not going to make my favorites list, but it's a good and quick read.
          Rumors of my demise have been greatly exaggerated... again...

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          • Originally posted by sickpup View Post
            If it had been written by just about anyone else, I would have probably given up on it. Not because it isn't a good book, it's just the writing style... it's overly "hooah!"/"gung-ho"/"I'm bad ass!".

            I know a few Marines. I am used to this

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            • I'm revisiting a classic, Bernard B. Fall's Hell In A very Small Place: The Seige of Dien Bien Phu. It's a masterful piece of military history.

              rna
              Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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                • Just started Boots on the Ground:A month in Iraq with the 82nd Airborne
                  "You can tell a lot about a fella's character by whether he picks out all of one color or just grabs a handful." -explaining why Reagan liked to have a jar of jelly beans on hand for important meetings

                  CO for 1st S.INC Shock Security Troop

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                  • 'Manhunt: The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln's Killer', by Swanson. My brother gave me his copy so I'd have something to read on the flight back here from LA. Looked to have potential, turned out to be an interesting read. Also reading two books for friends (one wants my opinion of whether it makes sense('How Hitler Could Have Won the War') and the other because the guy was surprised I hadn't read it ('The Great Gatsby'). So my list is full for the moment.
                    "Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room!"

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                    • I'm in the middle of Ship of Ghosts. It's really interesting and I enjoy reading it.


                      "You can tell a lot about a fella's character by whether he picks out all of one color or just grabs a handful." -explaining why Reagan liked to have a jar of jelly beans on hand for important meetings

                      CO for 1st S.INC Shock Security Troop

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                      • I've started reading this, and it is fascinating.

                        Love. Where does it come from?
                        from The Thin Red Line

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                        • What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 18151848 by Daniel Walker Howe.

                          "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

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                          • The Luftwaffe:Creating an operational doctrine by James Corum
                            If you Ain't Cav,You Ain't S---

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                            • 'The Wages of Destruction' by Adam Tooze
                              Signing out.

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                              • Originally posted by cst784 View Post
                                Just arrived on my doorstep yesterday and I promptly dove right into it. Kaigun; Strategy, Tactics and Technology in the Imperial Japanese Navy 1887-194 by David Evans and Mark Peattie.
                                Yes I am quoting myself but for the purpose of a follow up on this book that I just finished. I would definately recommend Kaigun for anyone who has an interest in the Pacific THeater of World War II as it provides a good background to learn the genesis of why the Imperial Japanese Navy did the things they did during the war. Timeline wise it does tend to jump around quite a bit but only in order to finish discussion of the current topic before starting on the next one. Next up on the list, Tom Segev's 1967: Isreal, The War, and the Year That Transformed The Middle East.
                                Bill

                                "God is great, beer is good, and people are crazy"

                                Billy Currington

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