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  • Finished up " The French Religious Wars 1562-1598" and am now working on "Paul Revere and the World He Lived In" by Esther Forbes, which is an excellent pulitzer prize winner from 1943. Forbes goes into great detail about daily life in Boston during the mid 18th century, and the political and economic turmoil leading to Revolution.

    "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

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    • I've also been browsing through Our Dumb World: Atlas of the Planet Earth.



      How could you pass up a deal like 30% more Asia?

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      • I just got Kokoda by Peter Fitzsimons. So far it looks as though it will be as good as Tobruk, which is the best I have seen on that period and place.

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        • Just started reading Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card the other day. I'm a hundred or so pages into it, and almost cannot put it down. Very interesting read.
          "I am not an atomic playboy."
          Vice Admiral William P. Blandy

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          • Good book, but it may prove to be too long for it's own good.
            Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
            Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


            "Never pet a burning dog."

            RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
            http://www.mormon.org
            http://www.sca.org
            http://www.scv.org/
            http://www.scouting.org/

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            • I'm currently reading the 1st volume of Carl Sandberg's 4 volume "Abraham Lincoln, the War Years".

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              • "Victory Was Beyond Their Grasp" with the 272 Volks-Grenadier Division from the Hurtgen Forest to the heart of the Reich, By Douglas E Nash

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                • Originally posted by Tiger1 View Post
                  "Victory Was Beyond Their Grasp" with the 272 Volks-Grenadier Division from the Hurtgen Forest to the heart of the Reich, By Douglas E Nash
                  Ha! Doug is a good friend of mine. We worked together for a few months and now we conspire on projects at work all the time.
                  Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
                  Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


                  "Never pet a burning dog."

                  RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
                  http://www.mormon.org
                  http://www.sca.org
                  http://www.scv.org/
                  http://www.scouting.org/

                  Comment


                  • The Road to Serfdom by F.A. Hayek.

                    "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

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                    • Calculus Textbook


                      "We Will Stay Here, If We Must All Go to Hell Together"
                      -Col. John R. Cooke, 27th NC

                      Avatar: My Grandfather on the right. His twin on the left. Their older brother in the middle. In their Navy Blues

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                      • Current Read

                        The Day of Battle by Rick Atkinson. Volume II of the US Army in Europe during WWII trilogy.
                        God Save The Republic.

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                        • Originally posted by HiredGoon View Post
                          The Road to Serfdom by F.A. Hayek.

                          Looks excellent...how dated is it? Does it still appear to be relevant? It seems a lot like the one I am reading (look a few up).
                          Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
                          Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


                          "Never pet a burning dog."

                          RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
                          http://www.mormon.org
                          http://www.sca.org
                          http://www.scv.org/
                          http://www.scouting.org/

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Janos View Post
                            Looks excellent...how dated is it? Does it still appear to be relevant? It seems a lot like the one I am reading (look a few up).
                            It was first published in 1944, but I believe much of it is very relevant for today. I'm only just getting into it, but it is very good so far. Hayek was an Austrian School economist (classical liberalism, free market capitalism, etc) and political philosopher, opposed to the German School and Keynesian economics. The main thesis is that collectivism leads to tyranny, and he uses the history of Germany and the Soviet Union as examples of the "road to serfdom."

                            There are two main reasons Hayek wrote the book. In the 1930s there were a lot of people who believed that since the Nazis were persecuting communists and socialists that National Socialism or Nazism was therefore the last dying gasp of capitalism, or not a socialist movement at all. Hayek on the other hand had been involved in the inter war debates between the Austrian School and German School economists on the Continent, and watched the progression of Nazism from the socialist programs of post-WWI Germany. So one of the main arguments of Hayek is that Nazism was at root a socialist movement that could be traced back to the socialism of Bismarck in the 19th century.

                            The other main reason Hayek wrote was that he was concerned with what he was hearing and seeing in England and the U.S. during WWII. This is where the book gets really relevant for today. During the war there was an increasing amount of people calling for the centralization of power necessary for the war effort, to be made permanent for a new centrally planned post-war society in both England and the U.S. This of course greatly alarmed Hayek who tried to warn against such measures. He highlights the great classical liberal heritage of both countries. And argues that we must not fall for the imagined benefits of a wartime centrally planned economy and collectivist society. This was exactly how Germany fell into Socialism and the Nazi's came to power. And central planning, with its dismantling of the free market, leads to the destruction of all individual economic and personal freedom. I think this message is especially relevant for today when there are increasing calls for centralized control, and so many seem willing to give up their remaining liberty for the sake of "security" in our current war.
                            "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

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                            • Thanks HiredGoon, I'll find a copy.
                              Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
                              Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


                              "Never pet a burning dog."

                              RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
                              http://www.mormon.org
                              http://www.sca.org
                              http://www.scv.org/
                              http://www.scouting.org/

                              Comment


                              • After the good read of the 2003 attack into Iraq, called 'Cobra II', which i recommend, I'm now reading Gerals Astor's good book on the Ardennes battle called 'A blood rimmed tide'.

                                This one is as good as his great book on the 8th airforce, simply called 'The mighty eight'.

                                And redeems him after his not so good book about Okinawa called 'Operation Iceberg'.

                                Two out of three makes him a good writer, and 'Op Iceberg' wasnt bad, it just wasnt a great read like 'the mighty eight', or 'A blood rimmed tide' are...

                                I fully recommend 'A blood rimmed tide'!
                                "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

                                If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

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