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  • Von Richter
    replied
    'The Wilt Alternative', nice change from my usual fare, and very funny.


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  • panther3485
    replied
    Just finished the Osprey volume, Jutland 1916 - Clash of the Dreadnoughts, by Charles London, which certainly gives a good account and overview of the battle.
    As a bonus, today I picked up this gem:


    image_82518.jpg

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  • OttoHarkaman
    replied
    450px-The_Parthenon_in_Athens.jpg
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parthenon

    The Parthenon Enigma
    by Joan Breton Connelly
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...rthenon-enigma

    17883913.jpg

    Built in the fifth century b.c., the Parthenon has been venerated for more than two millennia as the West’s ultimate paragon of beauty and proportion. Since the Enlightenment, it has also come to represent our political ideals, the lavish temple to the goddess Athena serving as the model for our most hallowed civic architecture. But how much do the values of those who built the Parthenon truly correspond with our own?
    Really enjoying this book!
    Attached Files

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  • Capt AFB
    replied
    Just finished reading Bernard Cornwell latest Uthred adventure: Sword of Kings. Good read, especially if you are a Cornwell fan.

    Also finished ''Fighter Pilot'' by Paul Richey, a classic book. The author writes about his experience as a Hurricane Pilot in France at the beginning of WW2. Quite interesting read for those interested in the day-to-day lives of fighter pilots in the early days of war.

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  • leandros
    replied
    John Toland: "But not in shame".

    Fred

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  • McMax
    replied
    9780451475046_p0_v3_s550x406.jpg

    A new history of the US Army in the
    Asiatic-Pacific Theater of WW 2.

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  • marktwain
    replied
    even better than the movie.....

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  • Phaing
    replied
    Future Shock, by Alvin Toffler

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  • OttoHarkaman
    replied
    Magnifico: The Brilliant Life and Violent Times of Lorenzo de' Medici - Miles J. Unger

    51LmAJZzItL._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

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  • Greybriar
    replied
    Sea of Glory: America's Voyage of Discovery, The U.S. Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842 by Nathaniel Philbrick.

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  • marktwain
    replied
    You finished the collected works of Van Wyck Mason, Walle?

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  • walle
    replied
    The Myth of the Andalusian Paradise: Moslems, Christians, and Jews under Islamic rule in Medieval Spain.

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  • Achtung Baby
    replied
    Finished Niall Ferguson's 'The square and the tower'.

    Most history is hierarchical: it's about emperors, presidents, prime ministers and field marshals. It's about states, armies and corporations. It's about orders from on high. Even history "from below" is often about trade unions and workers' parties. But what if that's simply because hierarchical institutions create the archives that historians rely on? What if we are missing the informal, less well documented social networks that are the true sources of power and drivers of change?

    The 21st century has been hailed as the Age of Networks. However, in The Square and the Tower, Niall Ferguson argues that networks have always been with us, from the structure of the brain to the food chain, from the family tree to freemasonry. Throughout history, hierarchies housed in high towers have claimed to rule, but often real power has resided in the networks in the town square below. For it is networks that tend to innovate. And it is through networks that revolutionary ideas can contagiously spread.
    35629744._UY400_SS400_.jpg

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Just finished Howard Blum's "The Eve of Destruction: The Untold Story of the Yom Kippur war". The author conducted extensive interviews focusing the personality clashes and decisions, as well as some lower level commanders' experience, during the war.

    I was a junior Captain assigned to HQ USAREUR as a watch officer screening all intelligence reports from Europe, North Africa, and Middle East to the western border of Afghanistan looking for indications of hostilities. The Yom Kippur war broke on my shift. I had been listing and reporting indicators of hostilities the week before the war starting on Saturday, October 6, 1973. The major who was the Middle east desk officer had briefed at 1730 hrs, Oct 5th, that there would be no war in the Middle East. I came in three hours early the next morning for my shift and read a report that prompted my start in alerting the HQ USAREUR staff and command. Blum identifies the report which was also catalytic intelligence information for the Israeli leadership--the Soviet advisers were putting their families on airplanes for departure.
    Last edited by R.N. Armstrong; 13 Aug 19, 04:27.

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  • Pruitt
    replied
    I have started reading some of my Patrick O'Brian books again.

    Pruitt

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