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  • Bwaha
    replied
    Well I'm reading some Clive Cussler pulp but what I'm listening to is Starship Troopers.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g27OG89i8Ww&t=5774s

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Just finished Nathaniel Philbrick's Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution. Well researched, well written--reads like a novel. I've ordered another book by the author, The Last Stand: Custer, Sitting Bull and the Battle of the Little Bighorn--looking to see what he finds in the personalities (like he did in Bunker Hill).

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  • Martok
    replied
    Recently finished reading this: Area X: The Southern Reach Trilogy: Annihilation; Authority; Acceptance


    51f%2BMOTspjL._SX374_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg


    Good book. Suffers from being a bit plodding at times, but worth reading through. The movie "Annihilation" starring Padme Thor's Girlfriend was based on book one of the trilogy. "Annihilation" was actually a decent movie, but of course more enjoyable if you had first read the book.
    Last edited by Martok; 27 Aug 18, 12:34.

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  • GCoyote
    replied
    Niall Ferguson's The Ascent of Money.
    War is after all very expensive.

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  • Greybriar
    replied
    I have finished The President Is Missing and am now reading The First Confessor: The Legend of Magda Searus by Terry Goodkind.

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  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by Greybriar View Post

    No. Although it's not a book that reads like it was written by a former President of the United States. Or perhaps I was expecting too much.
    The BBC review gave it half a star out of five.

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  • Greybriar
    replied
    Originally posted by MarkV View Post

    Do you need someone to throw you a lifeline?
    No. Although it's not a book that reads like it was written by a former President of the United States. Or perhaps I was expecting too much.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pruitt
    replied
    Re-reading my series on the Marine Corps by WEB Griffith.

    Pruitt

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  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by Greybriar View Post
    I am a hundred pages into The President Is Missing by Bill Clinton and James Patterson.
    Do you need someone to throw you a lifeline?

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  • Greybriar
    replied
    I am a hundred pages into The President Is Missing by Bill Clinton and James Patterson.

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  • Capt AFB
    replied
    Just finished "Hell Island" by Dan McCaffery.

    The book covers the air battle over Malta in 1942.

    Although the subtitle mentions Canadian pilots, the author does not only focus on Canadians and fighter pilots. It is well-researched and covers German, Italian, Commonwealth and Maltese aspects of the battle - fighters, bombers, reconnaissance, convoys, submarine warfare, living conditions on the island etc

    Highly recommended for anyone interested in WW2 air war.

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  • General_Jacke
    replied
    Just finished devil’s due of the destroyermen series

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  • Legate
    replied
    Originally posted by Cheetah772 View Post
    Been reading Sean Naylor's Relentless Strike: Secret History of JSOC, and Mark Morris' Norman Conquest. Both are good books.
    Morris is a great one, I really enjoyed his bio of Edward I.

    Leave a comment:


  • OttoHarkaman
    replied
    The Classical Art of Command: Eight Greek Generals Who Shaped the History of Warfare by Joseph Roisman
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    The Classical Age of Greece produced some of history's best-known generals and commanders. They include the Spartan king Leonidas, who embodied his countrymen's heroic ethos in the battle of Thermopylae; the Athenian leader Themistocles, credited as the architect of Athens' naval power and of the Greek victory over the Persians; the famous democratic leader, Pericles, who prepared Athens and directed its conflict with Sparta, known as the Peloponnesian War; the Athenian general Demosthenes, who deviated from contemporary conventions of warfare with his innovative approach; the Spartan general Lysander, who won the Peloponnesian War for Sparta; Dionysius I of Syracuse, arguably the most innovative and best skilled of the eight generals discussed in this book; and Epaminondas and Pelopidas who together transformed their city, Thebes, into an hegemonic power.

    The Art of Renaissance Warfare: From The Fall of Constantinople to the Thirty Years War by Stephen Turnbull
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    The Art of Renaissance Warfare tells the story of the knight during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries – from the great victories of Edward III and the Black Prince to the fall of Richard III on Bosworth Field.

    During this period, new technology on the battlefield posed deadly challenges for the mounted warrior; but they also stimulated change, and the knight moved with the times. Having survived the longbow devastation at Crécy, Poitiers and Agincourt, he emerged triumphant, his armor lighter and more effective, and his military skills indispensable.

    This was the great age of the orders of chivalry and the freemasonry of arms that bound together comrades and adversaries in a tight international military caste. Men such as Bertrand du Guesclin and Sir John Chandos loom large in the pages of this book – bold leaders and brave warriors, imbued with these traditions of chivalry and knighthood. How their heroic endeavors and the knightly code of conduct could be reconciled with the indiscriminate carnage of the 'chevauchée' and the depredations of the 'free companies' is one of the principal themes of this informative and entertaining book.
    Attached Files

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  • 101combatvet
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post

    Kanon raises that point. Jewess character states the Air Raid sirens were used to mask the nighttime knocking on doors, screams, and hollering as they pulled people from the Jewish ghetto.
    The Italians seemed to blame it all on the Germans as if they had a pistol pointed at them; I call it cowardice behavior as with much of what they did. Italian Jews were worthy of government protection and had the Italians been masculine they could have disobeyed German policy.

    Funny how the Italian anti-Jewish movement predates that of the German one, they have a lot of nerve.

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