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  • Still reading 'Air Power', by Budiansky, and still a good detailed account of the start rise and dominance of air power in the last hundred years...

    But I have also started the phenominally good, "Out of nowhere", 'A history of the Military Sniper'. By Martin Pegler...

    How can I put it, It goes through the early days (from 1500 to the mid 1700), in a nicely fast pace, but still giving a good idea and a fiew of the most famous stories of long distance shooting...

    Then it gets more detailed with the US war of indipendence, and from there on you get good info, I'n now in the part where it kicks into ww1, after a good account of the Boer war, and there it steps into yet a third gear of detail, and has ww1 put into stages of the first German superiority, then the allied failed responce, lessons learned, and in the end, the allied succesfull responce, that is the basis of techniques used today...

    Great book, and I'm only in the beginning!

    And to celebrate, I'll put some pics of the new wave of semi auto sniper rifles, which after all are the firearm industries only real thing that there is to work on besides optics and/or rangefinding... (bullets and personal craftmanship will always improve somehow, even the handgun 45apc, round has ways of 'blossoming' on impact that would have seemed totally out of this world to a thirties police sergeant!

    If anybody disagrees, think about the accuracy of ww1 rifles! Good enough to merit usage in Vietnam fifty years later (Sprinfield bolt action)....
    Attached Files
    "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

    If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

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    • What If?
      Essays by Stephen E. Ambrose, John Keegan, David McCullough, James M. McPherson, and others...
      Edited by Robert Crowley
      The World's Foremost Military Historians Imagine What Might Have Been

      Military Misfortunes
      The Anatomy of Failure in War
      By Eliot A. Cohen and John Gooch

      Patton and Rommel
      Men of War in the Twentieth Century
      By Dennis Showalter

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      • "Little Wars", by H.G. Wells. This is a short read; I'm only a few pages into it, but it's very entertaining. (Apparently, Wells didn't think much of women and children.)

        Interesting to hear him describe the evolution of what today we would call miniatures wargaming. Also very cool because it's available online via Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/3691
        "I am not an atomic playboy."
        Vice Admiral William P. Blandy

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        • I'm reading "An Army at Dawn" by Rick Atkinson...it seems very interesting!
          Historia Magistra Vitae.
          M. T. Cicero

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          • I'm currently reading D-Day by Ambrose
            "All Glory is Fleeting"

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            • Originally posted by Napalm View Post
              I'm currently reading D-Day by Ambrose
              I must say that I think that D-day by Ambrose is a must read for all beginner and intermediary military history readers!

              It's very good, and not only focuses on the fighting, but on just how much effort went into this perhaps greatest single combined arms operation ever executed in the history of man...

              Mr Poundr.
              "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

              If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

              Comment


              • Originally posted by 17poundr View Post
                I must say that I think that D-day by Ambrose is a must read for all beginner and intermediary military history readers!

                It's very good, and not only focuses on the fighting, but on just how much effort went into this perhaps greatest single combined arms operation ever executed in the history of man...

                Mr Poundr.
                I agree. I would also recommend his book Citizen Soldiers. One comment on a portion of the book D-Day is that it appears that Mr. Ambrose misconstrued some of the accounts. Both of the accounts where he says that officers put a gun to the coxswain's head to make him move further in have been reported as false. The sole survivor on Capt. Zappacosta's craft, Bob Sales, said that the Captain never moved from his position at the front of the ship and the only words he had said the whole time coming in were to ask Bob what he saw when he peaked over the top of the craft. The Coxswain never moved the boat. He told them it was as far as he could get the craft in and Zappacosta said okay and they lowered the ramp. The other story about the sergeant pulling the gun apparently didn't happen like that. He did block the sailors path to the ramp lever but never pulled the pistol. Anyway it is still a good book.

                Matt
                "We Will Stay Here, If We Must All Go to Hell Together"
                -Col. John R. Cooke, 27th NC

                Avatar: My Grandfather on the right. His twin on the left. Their older brother in the middle. In their Navy Blues

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                • I know it might not be a war book but it's mighty interesting

                  Serpent by Clive Cussler
                  "You can tell a lot about a fella's character by whether he picks out all of one color or just grabs a handful." -explaining why Reagan liked to have a jar of jelly beans on hand for important meetings

                  CO for 1st S.INC Shock Security Troop

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                  • "The First Crusade", by Thomas Asbridge
                    "God's War", by Christopher Tyerman
                    "The Great Arab Conquests", by Hugh Kennedy

                    Bit of a project this time.
                    Last edited by The Purist; 09 Oct 07, 23:37.
                    The Purist

                    Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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                    • Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone: by Martin Dugard
                      I often think how much easier the world would have been to manage if Herr Hitler and Signor Mussolini had been at Oxford. Lord Halifax

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                      • At the suggestions of some in the Cold War forum, I picked up a copy of Team Yankee yesterday at the library. So far, the Prologue is pretty good.
                        "I am not an atomic playboy."
                        Vice Admiral William P. Blandy

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                        • Just finished Gen Dallaire's Shake Hands with the Devil, his account as military leader of UN forces in Rwanda at the time of the genocide. The account is revealing in the sluggish political nature of UN capability and effectiveness. Most interesting is his assessment of the various involved African leaders who are educated at the same universities and colleges were are, and read the sam books as we do, and listen to the same news that we do. Dallaire made the point when he first went into country to assess the various factions, he later relfected back that they were assessing him and the UN's capability to control the situation--and we know their conclusions from subsequent events.

                          After reading his perspective, I can see why his UN leadership would consider him a loose cannon-on-deck. He constantly pushed for a mission creep when the UN did not have the capability and support for their initial mission. He pushed his soldiers into extremely risky and dangerous situations which resulted in military deaths. He encountered and was shocked by situations beyond his control in extreme brutalities [something far more alien than we see even in our television/movie violence] which other peoples are will to go to in achieving their ends and resulted in unimaginable ways and numbers of deaths in the population.

                          Dallaire's book is a sobering read and confirms [if Somalia did not] that the rest of the world knows the West does not want to shed much of their own blood for what it wants.

                          rna
                          Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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                          • Flashman
                            Horation Hornblower #1

                            Nice light historical fiction.
                            AHIKS - Play by (E)mail board wargaming since 1965.
                            The Blitz - Play by Email computer wargaming.

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                            • I'm reading "Sie Kommen" by Paul Carrell about Normandy Campaign on the german side. It seems interesting...
                              Historia Magistra Vitae.
                              M. T. Cicero

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                              • Originally posted by Warlord View Post
                                I'm reading "Sie Kommen" by Paul Carrell about Normandy Campaign on the german side. It seems interesting...
                                For those interested, Carell's book was translated into English, Invasion--They're Coming! Parenthetically, I had an opportunity to meet one of the German boat commanders in the opening scene.

                                rna
                                Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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