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  • Just reading Vulcan 607 about the Black Buck bombing attack by the RAF during the Falklands war when an RAF Vulcan flew 8000 miles to bomb Port Stanley Airfield
    Confucius he say, war not determine who's right. War determine who's left

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    • Just finished "Secrets of Rue St Roch" by Janet Morgan.

      "Synopsis
      Paris, 1917, and war is raging across Europe. Lise Rischard, an ordinary housewife stranded in the city, is desperate to return to her husband in Luxembourg. But her homeland is occupied by the enemy and she must pay a high price to get there: undertaking a dangerous spying mission for intelligence officer George Bruce of 41 Rue St Roch. As the fate of the war hangs in the balance, she and an intrepid group of men and women, including priest Father Cambron, schoolteacher Joseph Hansen and, above all, dashing adventurer and balloonist Albert Baschwitz Meau must risk their lives infiltrating German territory to bring vital information back to the allies."



      Great book about a British intelligence operation during WW1 based on documents that had been stroed in a cabinet up untill 1995. The cabinet belonged to a Capt Bruce who worked for British Intelligence.

      Great read. Really well put together. Some real eccentric characters.
      Lesliesplace forum

      Leslies place. Come on in and enjoy the company of a few good people.

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      • Also just finished.


        ZERO HOUR by Georg Grabenhorst

        "This is a work of fiction whose central character is a Hans Volkenhorn, eighteen years old when the story begins and an officer candidate, or Fahnenjunker. In the German army, recruitment for the Officer Corps was based on commissioning young men who joined the ranks as officer candidates (Fahnenjunkers) or cadets from the Cadet Corps. After a period of service as a private soldier, though with some privileges over his fellow privates, the Fahnenjunker was sent on a course for potential officers and if successful he was commissioned as a Fahnrich (ensign) with the right to wear the coveted officer’s sword knot.
        This novel is unusual for a German work of fiction on the Great War in that it eschews scenes of gratuitous brutality and blood and gore and yet the descriptions of the battlefields and other scenes where our hero was involved are vivid enough, for which the translator, A. Featherstonhaugh, must take the credit. Volkenhorn is a sensitive, artistic individual, very much family-minded, scarcely an adult when his war begins (in the summer of 1917 on the Flanders coast) and not yet twenty when his war ends in blindness. He was a rifleman in an infantry battalion but soon transferred to the MG company. Back home he has a girl friend, Annaliese, to whom he is constantly writing letters and to whom his thoughts are constantly turning. He has much to say about his fellow ‘Junkers’ whose friendships were all-important to him, and yet admitting his detestation of one of them for his filthy and smutty yarns, saying there were moments when he could cheerfully shoot him. His picture of the fighting at Poelcapelle is real enough and he recounts one incident when he comes across two German soldiers cutting thick pieces of flesh from a horse that had just gone down but was not dead. In a fury he puts three bullets in the animal’s head and turns on the men yelling: "They ought to be in your skulls, you brutes!” But for me the finest piece of descriptive writing comes towards the end when he is buriied in the trench by shellfire and rescued. It is the gradual loss of his sight over a period that is told with such realism that you can almost feel it yourself. This story is a fine piece of writing."
        Lesliesplace forum

        Leslies place. Come on in and enjoy the company of a few good people.

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        • Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
          The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of two chemical substances: if there is any reaction, both are transformed. -Carl Jung

          Hell is other people. -Jean-Paul Sarte

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          • Originally posted by BarcelonaBlom
            Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
            "Jimmy Stewart, Bomber Pilot" The story of Hollywood actor Jimmy Stewart and his tour of duty in the ETO during WW II. He was a true warrior, not a cardboard cut-out. Great book so far!
            "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

            Comment


            • Originally posted by BarcelonaBlom
              Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
              Speaking of which... anyone know where I can find an original Board version of Harpoon... Clancy mention's Larry Bond's Game I'm guessing the board one that GDW did...
              The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of two chemical substances: if there is any reaction, both are transformed. -Carl Jung

              Hell is other people. -Jean-Paul Sarte

              Comment


              • Not sure if this is an original version, but it's by GDW, it's used and sells for $12 . Feal free to check it out:

                http://www.boardgamegeek.com/game/5928
                All warfare is based on deception.
                Sun Tzu - Art of war - Chapter One - Laying Plans


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                • Finally!!!! I got DAYS OF INFAMY from BB. In about 100 pages....and it's a very addicting book. Harry Turtledove is a genius. Love his influx of Japanese idioms. We used the same ones when I was in Nippon.
                  Now it's ten years later but he still keeps up the fight
                  In Ireland, in Lebanon, in Palestine and Berkeley
                  Patty Hearst heard the burst of Roland's Thompson gun and bought it

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                  • Reading -and responding

                    Currently reading: Sleeping with the Devil - by Robert Baer -about the US-Saudi relations.


                    Originally posted by Cap. Teancum
                    Not sure if this is an original version, but it's by GDW, it's used and sells for $12 . Feal free to check it out:

                    http://www.boardgamegeek.com/game/5928
                    I got this -this is the rules packages plus some modules; however this itself was a miniatures' rule set. There is a basic version - that I think is a board game.

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                    • Harpoon by GDW was the first iteration of Harpoon, and maybe the only one that is playable without a PhD in Math (you only needed a Masters for the first Harpoon). The Captains Edition was a simplified version, but all of them have been miniature rules. Great info on lots of weapon platforms, but tough to play especially with Aircraft and Subs in the mix.
                      I would define true courage to be a perfect sensibility of the measure of danger, and a mental willingness to endure it.
                      --William T. Sherman

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                      • Finishing up War Stories III - The Heroes Who Helped Defeat Hitler by Oliver North. Say what you will about North, he truly loves combat troops and veterans. The book is a pretty interesting read. The oral histories are there to give a human face to the history. The book is an mile-wide inch-deep overview, but some of the stories are great.

                        Also finished Alexander Kent's To Glory We Steer. Think something between Horatio Hornblower and Jack Aubry. Excellent story set on a troubled ship in the West Indies in 1782. It is number 5 in the series, but I found it at a garage sale, so I won't complain.

                        Next up... All American All the Way and One and Roughneck Nine One.
                        I would define true courage to be a perfect sensibility of the measure of danger, and a mental willingness to endure it.
                        --William T. Sherman

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                        • Europe's Last Summer: Who Started The Great War in 194? by David Fromkin.

                          An examination of the origins of WWI. It's based on the idea that WWI was started intentionaly. It was not an unexpected surprise as many people of the era thought. German generals saw the war as inevitable and manipulated events so that it would be fought on their terms.

                          I had not heard of Fromkin before picking this up. A really good read. It's understandable and explains a lot of the political and cultural interactions/conflicts leading up to the war very well.

                          You need to read a lot about the Balkans in order for little things to come together as a coherant system of events. This book helps a lot.
                          AHIKS - Play by (E)mail board wargaming since 1965.
                          The Blitz - Play by Email computer wargaming.

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                          • Originally posted by Cherper
                            Just finished Shooter by Jack Coughlin. Fast read of a marine sniper in Iraq.

                            Next up is Franco-Prussian War by Michael Howard.
                            How is Franco-Prussian War ? I recently picked it up, but have a few books to get through prior to starting in on that.

                            Currently reading Panzer Battles, by Von Mellenthin. Next up:

                            'Washington's Crossing' by David Hackett Fischer
                            'Landscape Turned Red' by Stephen Sears
                            'Gettysburg' by Stephen Sears
                            "When they get in trouble they send for the sonsabitches." - Admiral King

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                            • Originally posted by vyshka
                              How is Franco-Prussian War ? I recently picked it up, but have a few books to get through prior to starting in on that.
                              At the rate I am reading it, it will take as long as the actual event. I am reading this one as time permits. So far (only about 150 pages in) it is pretty decent. I have learned a lot about an era that I knew next to nothing about.
                              I would define true courage to be a perfect sensibility of the measure of danger, and a mental willingness to endure it.
                              --William T. Sherman

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by BarcelonaBlom
                                Speaking of which... anyone know where I can find an original Board version of Harpoon... Clancy mention's Larry Bond's Game I'm guessing the board one that GDW did...
                                Actually Harpoon existed well before GDW came out with a version. Clancy knows Larry Bond (who helped
                                with those parts of RSS) and I imagine they were probably using the rules in whatever state Larry had
                                them at the time. I think originally Harpoon was just a rulebook. You needed to buy miniatures from
                                someone like alnavco.

                                Clash of Arms has the current version of the rules (4.0 or something like that).
                                "When they get in trouble they send for the sonsabitches." - Admiral King

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