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  • Originally posted by liuzg150181
    Tried to look for "Hans von Seecht" using search engine but unfortunately it only yields 10 results which doesnt disseminate much info........
    Would you like to elaborate more on his reform?

    Quite an excellent read, actually. Von Seeckt turned the Reichwehr into a thoroughly professional army that based its doctrine on the 'offense' and strove to introduce mobile warfare priciples from as early as 1921. Tank/Anti-tank training were stressed from the very beginning, even though the army needed to use mock-ups. The same experimentation was done with aircraft,...air operations were assumed in every maneuver.

    The army selection process was the most rigorous of any with even privates being turned away if they were not of a certain intelligence. The Versailles treaty limited the Reichwehr to 100,000 men which was used to develop a professional training cadre with 4000 officers, 19,000 Senior NCOs, 38,000 junior NCOs and only 36,500 privates. When time came to expand, the army was prepared to train what became the Wehrmacht. While other nations had 2 year, 1 1/2 year or even 1 year conscripts, the Germans had 12 year volunteers with 25 year professional officers. These terms were imposed by Versailles but von Seeckt made the best of them.

    Fascinating read,...the Wehrmacht really had a solid foundation to build on,...from motorization right up to tactical aircraft.
    The Purist

    Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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    • "The Seeds of Disaster, The Development of French Army Doctrine, 1919-1939", by Robert Allen Doughty.

      If you read his "The Breaking Point, Sedan and the Fall of France, 1940", "Seeds of Disaster" is the examination of what factors went into the making of the French doctrine that failed so badly in 1940.
      The Purist

      Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

      Comment


      • Just finished reading Slaughter at Halbe-The Destruction of Hitler's 9th Army, April 1945, by Tony Le Tissier.

        And have just begun 2 books-

        The Zimmermann Telegram, by Barbara Tuchmann (World War I)

        &

        Beyond Band of Brothers, by Dick Winters
        Kampfgruppe - A war gaming clan since 1998

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        • Band of Brothers by Ambrose.
          "What are we holding on to, Sam?"

          "That there's still some good in the world, Mr. Frodo. And it's worth fighting for."

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          • Escape from Canada - John Melady
            Castles of Steel - Robert Massie
            Black May - Micheal Gannon
            On Seas of Glory - John Leeman

            Guess the University style of reading has become addictive reading multiple books at once

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            • Heinlein's Starship Troopers. I read it more than 20 years ago I think. It comes up here a lot and is a great book. So, I decided to re-read it.

              Finishing up Virgil's Aeneid as well. I started it a while back and was about half way through it when I lost it. Turned out it was stuck under a towel in my cycling pannier. Found it when I had to wipe down my bike the other day.
              AHIKS - Play by (E)mail board wargaming since 1965.
              The Blitz - Play by Email computer wargaming.

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              • C.V. Wedgewood's "The Thirty Years War."
                "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

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                • Originally posted by HiredGoon
                  C.V. Wedgewood's "The Thirty Years War."
                  Read that years ago now, also IIRC 'William the Silent'.

                  Have a half read copy of the 'The King's War' by the same author lying about the place.
                  http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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                  • I'm in the middle of two books at the moment...

                    The Philippine War, 1899-1902 by Brian McAllister Linn. A good history book...But not a page turner. If you want a general overview of this campaign...Max Boot's Savage Wars of Peace is a better choice. It is an area of historical interest to me...It just might take a while to read it. IMO the Philippines War is a very good historical analogy to modern day Iraq.


                    War of Nerves: Chemical Warfare from World War I to al-Qaeda by Jonathan Tucker. This is a very well written book. It is technically sound without being overwhelming. It is very much a page turner. The book focuses primarily on nerve agents...mustard, phosgene and other chemical weapons are discussed in far less detail.

                    Originally posted by The Purist
                    Definitely give this book a close read, Dave. I was not aware that the fight was so tough or that Israeli losses were so heavy. There is more than one occasion where a different decision made by the Jordanians or Egyptians could have destroyed the Israeli army. Fog of war, even in the late 20th century, was still a powerful influence on the battlefield.
                    Six Days of War is on my short list…Tucker has a chapter on Nasser’s use of chemical weapons in Yemen…possibly including VX…Too many books, too little time!
                    Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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                    • "To Dare and To Conquer: Special Operations and the Destiny of Nations from Achilles to Al Queda" by Derek Leebaret
                      ISBN: 0-316-14384-7

                      First paragraph of flap:

                      "Three thousand years ago a small band of heroes crept in darkness out of the Trojan Horse to bring down a kingdom. Today such special warriors rappel from silenced helicopters or emerge out of submarines. From earliest times, the men who condcut these extreme missions have lived, and died athe the bloody intersection of destiny, legend and high imagination. From the Bible to Bafhdad, special oeprations have surprised and destroyed opponents who would seem to be infinitely stronger. To understand these missions is to know not only the fiercest mode of warfare but the tipping points of civilizations.'
                      Boston Strong!

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                      • Originally posted by Wolfe Tone
                        Read that years ago now, also IIRC 'William the Silent'.

                        Have a half read copy of the 'The King's War' by the same author lying about the place.
                        I've just started "The Thirty Years War." It's a new area of history I'm venturing into, most of my historical studies being in early North America, and the theological aspects of the Reformation. What did you think of it?
                        "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

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                        • "The Peloponnesian War", by Donald Kagan (with a copy of Thucydides "History of the Peloponnesian War" kept nearby)
                          The Purist

                          Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

                          Comment


                          • The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. Not a military book but the story is set up by the overthrow of Zahir Shah in Afghanistan and the invasion by the USSR a few years later. A Pashtun boy and his father flee to California to escape the Soviet invasion leaving the boy's Hazara friend/servant behind.
                            AHIKS - Play by (E)mail board wargaming since 1965.
                            The Blitz - Play by Email computer wargaming.

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                            • I just picked up Robert Tanner's "Stonewall in the Valley" and found a $10 hardcover edition of von Mellenthin's "Panzer Battles" at Borders. I will probably bring them both when I go to Boston this weekend for 3 weeks of work.
                              "When they get in trouble they send for the sonsabitches." - Admiral King

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                              • Currently reading Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose.

                                Next on my list is Long Range Desert Group by W.B.K. Shaw. Really looking forward to this one...
                                Vivos voco Mortuos plango Fulgura frango

                                I call the living, I mourn the dead, I chase the lightning.


                                From the Imre Nagy Memorial, Budapest Hungary

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