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  • Originally posted by M.Koch
    Yeah...i was lucky and got one of the last copys remaining. Now they´re collecting orders to start a reprint.

    MK
    Check out our webpage for our NFL picks http://members.cox.net/mjohns59/

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    • Slaughter House, hand book of the Eastern Front.
      yeah!

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      • I'm currently reading "The Coming of the Third Reich" by Richard J Evans. It was quite an interesting time in Central and Eastern Europe.

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        • Walking the Bible, by Bruce Feiler. This is the first book he wrote, and the third one that I've read (I'm prone to doing things backwards -- for example my nose runs and my feet smell ). He is a rabbi who travels the middle east visiting places named in scripture and relates their importance. I read his first book, Abraham, just after visiting Abraham's birthplace at Ur, in Iraq. The author is very good, conversational, and truthful about what is conjecture and what is fact.
          Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
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          "Never pet a burning dog."

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          • Das Reich by Max Hastings, "The march of the 2nd SS Panzer Division through France, June 1944".

            Within days of the D-Day landings, the "Das Reich" 2nd SS Panzer Division marched North through France to reinforce the front-line defenders of Hitler's Fortress Europe.

            Veterans of the bloodiest fighting of the Russian Front, 15,000 men with tanks and artillery, they were hounded for every mile of their march by saboteurs of the Resistance and agents of the Allied Special Forces

            Along their route they took reprisals so savage they will live forever in the chronicles of the most appalling atrocities of war.
            Fascinating reading, I have the utmost respect for the resistants who risked certain death and brutal reprisals against civilians such as those at Tulle and Oradour Sur Glane, in order to buy a few days vital time for the allied invasion force. In the end, a journey which should have taken a matter of days, instead took three weeks.

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            • Originally posted by The Doctor
              I started reading this book a few years ago, but got side-tracked. What I did read was excellent....I had never realized before reading Oren's book that Nasser's Egyptian forces had used chemical weapons when they intervened in Yemen prior to the Six Day War....
              .
              Definitely give this book a close read, Dave. I was not aware that the fight was so tough or that Israeli losses were so heavy. There is more than one occassion where a different decision made by the Jordanians or Egyptians could have destroyed the Israeli army. Fog of war, even in the late 20th century, was still a powerful influence on the battlefield.
              The Purist

              Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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              • Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong
                Reading The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History by Peter Heather. He maintains that it was Rome's enemies who learned how to dismantle the empire rather than the conventional wisdom that it fell from internal corruption.
                Ohhhh,...I think that is one of the 18 books I bought for my 2007 reading list, perhaps I will have to bump it up a few places.
                The Purist

                Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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                • Currently finishing up "Harold, The Last Anglo-Saxon King" by Ian W Walker. An excellent read on just who Harold Godwinson was and how his family rose to a position of power in Anglo-Saxon England. It goes in to some depth in explaining how the Norman claim to the throne was, at best, perhaps a misunderstanding,...if not outright false.

                  This book and "1066, The Year of Three Battles", by Frank McLynn, really help explain the events of that year and the incredible changes the brought to England and Europes history.
                  The Purist

                  Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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                  • Originally posted by The Purist
                    Definitely give this book a close read, Dave. I was not aware that the fight was so tough or that Israeli losses were so heavy. There is more than one occassion where a different decision made by the Jordanians or Egyptians could have destroyed the Israeli army. Fog of war, even in the late 20th century, was still a powerful influence on the battlefield.
                    I have tried to keep this one at arm's length, but it sounds like it is a must read. Thanks!!
                    Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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                    • Just finished The March by E.L. Doctrow. An excellent novel about General Sherman's march through the Confederacy in 1864-1865.
                      There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full. -Henry Kissinger

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                      • Reading the following:
                        "Why the Allies Won" by R. Overy
                        "Barbarossa" an article collection from 1994 edited by Erickson and Dilks
                        and "The Soviets, the Munich Crisis, and the Coming of WWII" by Hugh Ragsdale

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                        • Our Culture, What's Left of It, by Theodore Dalrymple.

                          Fantastic set of essays/reflections on our culture and society from a great mind and humanist.
                          "You can't change the rules in the middle of the game."
                          "Hey, you just made that rule up."


                          Heil Dicke Bertha!

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                          • Six Armies in Normandy by John Keegan.

                            It's not what I expected. The introduction lead me to believe the book was going to relate the armies in Normandy to the politics and culture of the nations that produced them. There is a little of this but not nearly as much as the introduction leads you to believe. Still, it is a very good book.
                            Last edited by Duncan; 18 Mar 06, 18:12.
                            AHIKS - Play by (E)mail board wargaming since 1965.
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                            • Re-reading T.R. Fehrenbach's This Kind of War: A Study in Unpreparedness, a Korean War history--it is military history at its abolute best. Recently re-published by Brassey, they dropped the pictures and maps. Hang on to your old editions.

                              The new edition has an introduction by General Gordon Sullivan, an avid military history reader, who used as his theme while Chief of Staff Army, "No Task Force Smith".
                              Last edited by R.N. Armstrong; 19 Mar 06, 07:57.
                              Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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                              • Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong
                                The new edition has an introduction by General Gordon Sullivan, an avid military history reader, who used as his theme while Chief of Staff Army, "No Task Force Smith".
                                "No Task Force Smith"???
                                The Purist

                                Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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