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  • "Once Upon a Time in Russia: The Rise of the Oligarchs" by Ben Mezrich
    Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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    • Originally posted by DingBat View Post
      Worth the read?

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      • Currently halfway through with The Midgard Serpent by James Nelson. Have several more books to read after this one.

        Pruitt
        Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

        Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

        by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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        • Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post

          Worth the read?
          I think so. The book collection related to this battle is a "target rich environment", so if you've already read a few it seems unlikely that you'll learn too much that you didn't know already. But the book does do a couple of things I like in a history:

          1. Delves into the key decisions, good and bad, by the leaders on either side
          2. Sprinkles a lot of personal anecdotes throughout.

          Yes, I would recommend it.

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          • Still reading:


            I thought I was aware of the scale and scope of the shenanigans that "product defense" firms, lawyers and consultants could get up to via the science denial attacks on climate change, tobacco, etc, but this book showed me the true lengths people will go to for a buck. Sad, but informative.


            I just picked up these two:




            So far, it looks like I'm going to enjoy Crucible of Hell. I've gained an entirely new level of respect for the organizational abilities of the US military in WW2 when conducting these island invasions.

            I'm really looking forward to A Game of Birds and Wolves, but saving that until I finish Triumph of Doubt.

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            • Мемуары генерала Павла Николаевича Шатилова [Memoirs of General Pavel Nikolaevich Shatilov]

              147008-2.jpg


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              • The Overton Window by Beck. Highly recommended for anyone wanting to know how "perception management" works.

                Overton window
                [Overton window]
                NOUN
                US
                (the Overton window)
                1. the spectrum of ideas on public policy and social issues considered acceptable by the general public at a given time.
                Perception Management
                Perception management is a term originated by the US military. The US Department of Defense (DOD) gives this definition: Actions to convey and/or deny selected information and indicators to foreign audiences to influence their emotions, motives, and objective reasoning as well as to intelligence systems and leaders at all levels to influence official estimates, ultimately resulting in foreign behaviors and official actions favorable to the originator's objectives.
                Repeat a lie often enough and it becomes the truth”. Joseph Goebbels, Minister of Nazi Propaganda
                Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                • The British Are Coming by Rick Atkinson

                  Pruitt
                  Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                  Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                  by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

                  Comment



                  • Extremely interesting so far. Have learned a huge amounts re the increased concentration of most industries in developed countries. This has definitely contributed to the widening income and wealth inequality experienced in the last couple of decades.


                    I've been remiss in my reading of the Battle of the Atlantic, given Canada's contribution. This is a start at rectifying that failure. So far, the current impression is that the Germans had a chance to win the war in 1940/41 and simply failed to take advantage.

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                    • Originally posted by DingBat View Post
                      " ... So far, the current impression is that the Germans had a chance to win the war in 1940/41 and simply failed to take advantage."
                      A very interesting discussion could be had on that very topic ... in the right forum
                      ... even though it has been discussed on numerous previous occasions.

                      I think I should check out this book!
                      "Chatfield, there seems to be something wrong with our bloody ships today!"
                      Vice Admiral Beatty to Flag Captain Chatfield; Battle of Jutland, 31 May - 1 June, 1916.

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                      • The second volume of Churchill's "The Second World War": Their Finest Hour.

                        Sometimes the story gets a bit tedious but the overall account is very interesting although a bit biased.

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                        • Originally posted by panther3485 View Post
                          A very interesting discussion could be had on that very topic ... in the right forum
                          ... even though it has been discussed on numerous previous occasions.

                          I think I should check out this book!
                          I'll definitely start (er, restart) that discussion once I've finished. I realize it's a rehash for most of you, but I like to get others opinions on books when I've finished them. Thanks in advance for your tolerance.

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                          • No problem, it could be enjoyable even if it does mean going back over well trodden ground.
                            "Chatfield, there seems to be something wrong with our bloody ships today!"
                            Vice Admiral Beatty to Flag Captain Chatfield; Battle of Jutland, 31 May - 1 June, 1916.

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                            • I finished this book a couple days ago but find myself rereading many parts to digest all the information it encompasses. I had been aware of John W. Campbell but I never knew how much he had influence on Sci-Fi. I wish he hadn't got caught up with Ron Hubbard and his Dianetics. Campbell, Heinlein, Asimov, and Hubbard, their relationships and about Astounding Science Fiction Stories magazine makes a really fascinating book.

                              005dcc84.jpg

                              Alec Nevala-Lee, "Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction"

                              Astounding is the landmark account of the extraordinary partnership between four controversial writers—John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, and L. Ron Hubbard—who set off a revolution in science fiction and forever changed our world.
                              This book is very interesting as well, its problem (if you could call it that) is that it covers so much information its really hard to take it all in. There are three copious volumes filled to the brim about the development of Sci-Fi magazines.

                              0053cfba.jpg

                              Mike Ashley, "The Time Machines: The Story of the Science-Fiction Pulp Magazines from the Beginning to 1950"

                              This is the first of three volumes that chart the history of the science fiction magazine from the earliest days to the present. This first volume looks at the exuberant years of the pulp magazines. It traces the growth and development of the science fiction magazines from when Hugo Gernsback launched the very first, Amazing Stories, in 1926 through to the birth of the atomic age and the death of the pulps in the early 1950s. These were the days of the youth of science fiction, when it was brash, raw and exciting: the days of the first great space operas by Edward Elmer Smith and Edmond Hamilton, through the cosmic thought variants by Murray Leinster, Jack Williamson and others to the early 1940s when John W. Campbell at Astounding did his best to nurture the infant genre into adulthood. Under him such major names as Robert A. Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, A. E. van Vogt and Theodore Sturgeon emerged who, along with other such new talents as Ray Bradbury and Arthur C. Clarke, helped create modern science







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