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My name is Ashley and I am the one that moved the forum to its new hosting location. This was done for*security reasons and try to keep the forum from going down every other day.*I understand that the new forum looks very different from the old one but I promise almost everything you had before you still have it might just be in a different place. Awards it one of the only things that have gone away and won't be coming back. that is due to a limitation of the new hosting.

As I was going thought your posts I was able to fix a lot fo the issues you were listing. Below is kind of a running list of issues an what is fixed and what I am still working on.

Items that I have fixed from your comments:
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  • If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks,glory would become the prey of mediocre minds. Napoleon

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    • Originally posted by Legate View Post
      Sherman had a different view of glory

      Its glory is all moonshine. Even success, the most brilliant is over dead and mangled bodies [] It is only those who have not heard a shot, nor heard the shrills & groans of the wounded & lacerated (friend or foe) that cry aloud for more blood & more vengeance, more desolation

      Letter to James E. Yeatman (May 1865)
      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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      • Bravo Two Zero by Andy McNab

        I'm reading it again and every time I read it I sit open-mouthed at the sheer bad planning by the brass, as inserting an 8-man SAS patrol by Chinook into the middle of Iraq on foot was never going to work.
        1 escaped, 4 were captured and 1 was killed
        2 others died of hypothermia because nobody thought to issue the squad with sleeping bags or even survival blankets..duh..

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        • Originally posted by Poor Old Spike View Post
          I'm reading it again and every time I read it I sit open-mouthed at the sheer bad planning by the brass, as inserting an 8-man SAS patrol by Chinook into the middle of Iraq on foot was never going to work.
          1 escaped, 4 were captured and 1 was killed
          2 others died of hypothermia because nobody thought to issue the squad with sleeping bags or even survival blankets..duh..
          There are a number of books written about the SAS involvement in Gulf War I, and, at least,three books about Bravo Two Zero. (IIRC, the books are: Bravo Two Zero, The One That Got Away, The Real Story Behind Bravo Two Zero.)

          SAS patrols pretty much plan for their own mission, including how they want to be inserted (depending on available assets) and travel method once on the ground.

          The decision to walk to their target area was the patrol's decision, unlike other patrols, which decided to use Pink Panther jeeps or other vehicle to move around once on the ground...I recall the SAS leadership questionning the patrol about not using a vehicle (they were available) but McNab and his patrol made a case for not needing one...So blaming the brass for bad planning here does not stand.

          As for warmer clothing, again, its a decision by the patrol members what to carry...It is not like SAS members are raw recruits going on their first patrol...And if I recall correctly, they lost their Bergen bags after dropping them during a heavy contact with the Iraqi Army, which may explain why nobody had a extra layer of clothes or sleeping bag when they were escaping Westward towards Syria.
          Last edited by Capt AFB; 02 Apr 18, 09:10.

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          • Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
            ..SAS patrols pretty much plan for their own mission..So blaming the brass for bad planning here does not stand..
            Yes, the patrol members have to share most of the blame, personally I'd have refused pointblank to go.
            In fact I read somewhere that one SAS lieutenant(?) did just that, refusing to go on a mission that he didn't agree with, I can't remember if it was the Bravo Two Zero job or another one.
            The writer said something like- "As we embarked without him, we saw him sitting in the HQ office sipping tea".
            Full credit to him..

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            • reading "Truman"............last of the honest presidents..............

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              • Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
                There are a number of books written about the SAS involvement in Gulf War I, and, at least,three books about Bravo Two Zero. (IIRC, the books are: Bravo Two Zero, The One That Got Away, The Real Story Behind Bravo Two Zero.)

                SAS patrols pretty much plan for their own mission, including how they want to be inserted (depending on available assets) and travel method once on the ground.

                The decision to walk to their target area was the patrol's decision, unlike other patrols, which decided to use Pink Panther jeeps or other vehicle to move around once on the ground...I recall the SAS leadership questionning the patrol about not using a vehicle (they were available) but McNab and his patrol made a case for not needing one...So blaming the brass for bad planning here does not stand.

                As for warmer clothing, again, its a decision by the patrol members what to carry...It is not like SAS members are raw recruits going on their first patrol...And if I recall correctly, they lost their Bergen bags after dropping them during a heavy contact with the Iraqi Army, which may explain why nobody had a extra layer of clothes or sleeping bag when they were escaping Westward towards Syria.
                Close Quarter Battle by Mike Curtis is an interesting read, Curtis was a coal miner who joined the Paras just in time for the Falklands and went through Goose Green. He joined the SAS afterwards and had a pretty successful time in Iraq. Everything was planned out and flexible, especially in terms of clothing and how they used their vehicles. They had dramas with driving at first few nights, so they decided to drive by day. Everyone had their say, with the officer having final veto. Also, with everyone being caught out with poor clothing, one of the QM's bought a few dozen overcoats from a Saudi market, and they were in the field within days.
                One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions - Admiral Grace Hopper

                "The eunuch should not take pride in his chastity."
                Wu Cheng'en Monkey

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                • Around 3 months ago I was browsing a bookshop sci-fi section and bought a book on impulse called Ready Player One. At that stage I didn't realise it was going to be a movie.

                  Anyhow, this book is the worst pile of trash I have read. Boring, stunted, juvenile rubbish. I like computer games and sci fi, but this novel is literally just an account of someone playing a computer game. I haven't finished it, go about 40 pages in , and tried another 20 pages last week. It didn't improve, and I looked up the ending on Wikipedia so I didn't have to wade through the rest of this rubbish.

                  The bit that bugs me is that it really is just teen fiction, marketed to adults. This is Ernest clines first novel, but he did scriptwrite a film called Fanboys, that I quite liked, about 4 uber nerdy Star Wars fans in the lead up to the release of the phantom menace. Fanboys was fun, this is not.

                  And not only that, but it is SOCIALIST! The villains are trying to actually make money from a product people want. Woooo, scary. While the hero wants to take possession something someone else has built, without putting any work into it himself, the leftist dream.


                  If you are thinking about this book, just save your $18 and read the subtitles on a YouTube World of Warcraft walk through.
                  Last edited by Chukka; 03 Apr 18, 07:09.
                  One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions - Admiral Grace Hopper

                  "The eunuch should not take pride in his chastity."
                  Wu Cheng'en Monkey

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                  • I am currently reading 3 books.

                    Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization by Nicholson Baker
                    I found it at the Dollar Store. It is done in little vignettes so that you can pick it up, read a little, then put it down for a while. I am of the way through it. So far I find it sobering but interesting. It will probably take me all year to get through it, a few pages at a time.

                    The Faithful Spy by Alex Berenson: Good fun read. through it and enjoying it much!

                    The third one is Aethelstan: The First King of England by Sarah Foot. I have just started it and it is slow going. It is from the library. I can renew 6 times, which means that I can have it for 14 weeks if no-one else reserves it. It will probably take every bit of that time.

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                    • Currently re-reading Nuremberg Raid by Martin Middlebrook (a favorite author). He has such a nice smooth, but choked fully of information style.



                      Tuebor

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                      • Just finished "Backs to the Wall".

                        The book is about what happens after the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in 1759, which is the battle that decided the fate of New France, which becomes a British colony. Quebec City falls into the hands of the British as a result of that battle.

                        Well, the book provides info about what happens next, included the French almost recapturing Quebec City a year later at the Battle of Sainte-Foy and the following British campaign to end the French colony in Canada.

                        Quite interesting read about early military forces in North America, and where the Amerindians stood during the French-British fight over Canada. Very informative and well researched.

                        A map of the Battle of Sainte-Foy may have been useful to better guide the reader, but that would be my only negative critic of the book.
                        Attached Files
                        Last edited by Capt AFB; 07 Apr 18, 10:03.

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                        • An Infinity of Nations

                          An Infinity of Nations (How the Native New World Shaped Early North America) by Michael Witgen (2012).
                          https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...ity-of-nations
                          The book deals with the European Colonies on the Atlantic Seaboard and their interaction with the Wild Native New World which lay in the heart of North America time period (1600-1850).

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                          • Originally posted by Tuebor View Post
                            Currently re-reading Nuremberg Raid by Martin Middlebrook (a favorite author). He has such a nice smooth, but choked fully of information style.



                            Tuebor
                            Its a Good one all right - that and the Berlin Raids.
                            http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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                            • Currently reading stories from this book, which is itself part of a larger series:



                              Also reading this, after finding a copy in a local bookstore:



                              And giving a look at this series as well, which is just Tomb Raider only not Lara Croft:

                              QamuIs Heg qaq law' lorvIs yInqaq puS

                              (Better to die on your feet than live on your knees)

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                              • Just finished Eliot Pattison's "Skeleton God", An Inspector Shan Tao Yun mystery which began with an Edgar Award for the author's "The Skull Mantra" back in 1999. Inspector Shan is a fallen Chinese inspector placed in the "Gulag" of Tibet prison's. The author highlights Chinese takeover and control of the Tibetan population. The books are laced with cogent observations, here are few examples from the series:


                                "Criminal investigations [in Communist China and Tibet] made into social parables." ... "...the socialist dialectic. Prosecution of murder is usually a public phenomenon. You must be ready to explain the basics for prosecution here. There is always a political explanation.... That is the evidence you need."

                                "It is the socialist context that's important. Find the reactionary thread and build from there. A murder investigation is pointless unless it can becomes a parable for the people."

                                Inspector Shan's advice "...to keep shuffling the available facts unit he grasped the political truth of his case." ... "The best investigators, he had been taught in his first assignment, knew their job wasn't about assembling facts but about acquiring the right perspective on the facts.[Sound familiar?]"

                                "The greatest meditation is a mind that lets go, the greatest wisdom is seeing through appearances."

                                "Reality is nothing but a shared perception...."

                                "The Chinese are very clever. They study a people and determine what is most important to all to that people, then they find a means to hollow that thing out, to first take ways its power, then eventually remove it completely. In Tiber they take your holy men. Tell me, friend, without your holy men can a Tibetan be a Tibetan?" [Advice for US today?]

                                "The ultimate weapon wielded by Beijing had always been population. As in the western province of Xinjiang, the home of millions of Moslems belonging to Central Asian cultures, Beijing was turning the native population of Tibet into a minority in their own lands. Half of Tibet had been annexed to neighboring Chinese provinces."
                                Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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