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  • Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    After Jeroen's introduction of Robert Harris and reading "The Officer and A Spy" and "Conclave", I am off and running with "Pompeii" and "Enigma" in the ready rack with "Imperium" on order. I like the author's depth of research, character development, storytelling, and command of the language. For these reasons, I will read Munich despite a disappointed ending for Jeroen.
    Finished "Imperium" and now into "Conspirata". Received today Harris's nonfiction, "Good and Faithful Servant: The Unauthorized Biography of Bernard Ingham" from 1990 while he still had a day job of writing a weekly column in the Sunday Times. Blurb on the back observes, "By concentrating on the PM's beloved press secretary, Harris has found the perfect angle from which to survey the style and methods of the Thatcher regime."

    This nonfictional perfect angle describes the perfect perspective in his fictional works, such as the personal secretary as the storyteller in the Cicero Trilogy or the administrative cardinal in the Vatican involved in the Conclave.
    Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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    • Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
      This nonfictional perfect angle describes the perfect perspective in his fictional works, such as the personal secretary as the storyteller in the Cicero Trilogy or the administrative cardinal in the Vatican involved in the Conclave.
      Although it stared me in the face I never realised this red thread. You are right this angle is a trend throughout Harris work, another notable example where it is even woven in the title is :'the Ghost', adapted into quite a good movie by Roman Polanski.
      Here Harris employs in a thriller the same technique by concentrating on a PM's (Tony Blair?) ghost writer, which allows Harris to survey the style and methods of the Blair regime leading the UK into the Iraq War.

      BoRG

      You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

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      • Originally posted by Colonel Sennef View Post
        Although it stared me in the face I never realised this red thread. You are right this angle is a trend throughout Harris work, another notable example where it is even woven in the title is :'the Ghost', adapted into quite a good movie by Roman Polanski.
        Here Harris employs in a thriller the same technique by concentrating on a PM's (Tony Blair?) ghost writer, which allows Harris to survey the style and methods of the Blair regime leading the UK into the Iraq War.

        I saw Ghost Writer which I enjoyed, and now I am going to get the book, because a movie cannot pickup fully Harris's nuances in characters.
        Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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        • Picked up Harris' "Munich" as an audiobook for my road travels.

          Started reading Michael Korda's "Hero, the Life and Legend of Lawrence of Arabia"...A quite interesting read, very well researched and the author brings in the nuances from other authors that wrote bio's about TE Lawrence.

          Figured I wanted to read a bio of Lawrence of Arabia before reading his "Seven Pillars of Wisdom."

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          • For me reading Lawrence's 'Seven Pillars' was like riding across a desert on a camel--many parts became monotonous, but in Book III, Chapter 33, he explains his epiphany during a delirious illness for his concept to defeat the Turks. Brilliant--that chapter alone was worth the long ride.
            Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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            • deja-vu

              Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
              For me reading Lawrence's 'Seven Pillars' was like riding across a desert on a camel--many parts became monotonous, but in Book III, Chapter 33, he explains his epiphany during a delirious illness for his concept to defeat the Turks. Brilliant--that chapter alone was worth the long ride.
              You haven't seen reason to change your old preferences, have you Rick
              Nor have I, fully agree.
              BoRG

              You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

              Comment




              • Found at a second hand bookstore. Good coverage of Fubuki, Navigatori, Fantasque, Porter and Somers, Tribal, and Narvik classes of destroyers built/designed by Japan, Italy, France, US, UK and Germany between the wars.

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                • Currently listening to (I still read, but I use Audible when I'm walking) "A World Undone" by G.J. Meyer. It is about WWI. I am enjoying it. He covers all the theaters, but not in tedious detail. I especially like his "Background" chapters where he covers topics like Lawrence of Arabia.

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                  • Originally posted by warmoviebuff View Post
                    Currently listening to (I still read, but I use Audible when I'm walking) "A World Undone" by G.J. Meyer. It is about WWI. I am enjoying it. He covers all the theaters, but not in tedious detail. I especially like his "Background" chapters where he covers topics like Lawrence of Arabia.

                    Read this one a few years back, really enjoyed it. The "background" chapters are very interesting.
                    "Ultimately communism is an impossible Utopian dream imposed by hypocrites who will commit mass murder to achieve absurd goals"- Trebuchet

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                    • Just opened "The Wehrmacht's Last Stand- The German Campaigns of 1944-1945" by Robert Citino.
                      "Ultimately communism is an impossible Utopian dream imposed by hypocrites who will commit mass murder to achieve absurd goals"- Trebuchet

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                      • Into Robert Harris's third book of his Cicero trilogy, he continues to write clean, clear narrative with fresh analogies and metaphors. His trilogy stands with Graves's two books on Claudius. While Graves has a poetic command of the language and understanding of Roman history, Harris has keen insights to the political machinations of Romans. I lose sleep over Harris's compelling storytelling.
                        Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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                        • Glad to read this.
                          You have a way with words as well Rick.
                          BoRG

                          You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

                          Comment


                          • Close to Black History month so I started The Bondwoman's Narrative.
                            My worst jump story:
                            My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
                            As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
                            No lie.

                            ~
                            "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
                            -2 Commando Jumpmaster

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                            • The newest Journal of Military History

                              Among the articles:
                              How Wars End:Victorian Colonial Conflicts
                              Mapping the First World War: The Empowering Development of Mapmaking during the First World War in the British Army (some great illustrations with this article)
                              Technology, "Machine Age" Warfare and the Military Use of Dogs 1880-1918
                              The Yugoslav Partisans' Lost Victories: Operations in Montenegro and Bosnia-Herzegovina 1944-1945
                              Rommel Almighty? Italian Assessments of the "Desert Fox" during and After the Second World War (gives another view on Rommel not often considered in the English literature)

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                              • German Armored Trains 1904 - 1945.
                                Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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