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  • "Escape from Communist Heaven" by Dennis Dunivan.

    http://www.amazon.com/Escape-Communi...mmunist+heaven

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    • Just received in the mail and will start tonight, Aldous Huxley's "The Devils of Loudon". After The Grey Eminence I thought I would try another of his nonfictions. The billing on the book reads: "In 1632 an entire convent in the small French village of Loudon was apparently possessed by the devil. After a sensational and celebrated trial, the convent's charismatic priest Urban Grandier--accused of spiritually and sexually seducing the nuns in his charge--was convicted of being in league with Satan. Then he was burned at the stake for witchcraft.

      In this classic work by the legendary Aldous Huxley--a remarkable story of religious and sexual obsession considered by many to be his nonfiction masterpiece--a compelling historical event is clarified and brought to vivid life."

      I'll give you my impressions when I finish.
      Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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      • Another World Ship Society book. 328 page book dealing with every AMC the RN had, their actions, armament, philosophy of etc.

        Hard to be bettered for those with an interest in the subject.

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        • "Stasi: Shield and Sword of The Party" by John Schmeidel

          http://www.amazon.com/Stasi-Shield-S...ds=stasi+sword

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          • Hi all, been awhile.

            At the moment, I'm reading a few different things. Vicksburg 1863 by Winston Groom. I had an ancestor that fought at Champion Hill, and I feel like I don't know enough about the campaign. If anybody has any recommendations for a good study of Champion Hill, I'm all ears.

            The Third Coast: When Chicago Built The American Dream by Thomas Dyja. A cultural study of my city at mid-century, from just before WWII, to roughly the mid 60s, and how Chicago is responsible for founding or nurturing most of the cultural norms we take for granted in everyday life. Architecture, Poetry, Literature, Comedy, Television, Playboy, McDonald's for god's sake. It's eye-opening, albeit a little high brow and startchy for my taste. But, they had plenty of copies, it was Chicago's "One Book" this quarter, and I usually will read anything about how Chicago is the best.

            Limits to Growth by William W. Behrens III, Jørgen Randers, Dennis Meadows, and Donella Meadows. I'll be picking this up at the Library before work today. I own Meadows' Thinking in Systems: A Primer, and it was eye-opening. I'm hoping that this prior work is even better. All in all, a very dispassionate, systems view of the world. I'm intensely interested.

            ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

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            • Bill the Galactic Hero
              For my wife, in treatment for pancreatic cancer. Thank you for your support.

              https://www.gofundme.com/moving-moun...NPHmyoDrYlEkfE

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              • Hubris: The Tragedy of War in the 20th Century.
                Alistair Horne.

                Excellent as is all of his work. The Russo-Japanese war portion was particularly fascinating.
                I often think how much easier the world would have been to manage if Herr Hitler and Signor Mussolini had been at Oxford. Lord Halifax

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                • Very Special Ships: Abdiel-Class Fast Minelayers of World War Two



                  Schnellboote: A Complete Operational History

                  Currently working on both these titles as there is a fair bit of overlap in the history of these two types of vessels, especially in the Mediterranean theatre. Very interesting for anyone looking to learn more about mine warfare at sea in WW2

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                  • Raylan by Elmore Leonard.
                    "I have never known a combat soldier who did not show a residue of war." --Sergeant Ed Stewart, 84th Division, US Army, WWII

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
                      Just received in the mail and will start tonight, Aldous Huxley's "The Devils of Loudon". After The Grey Eminence I thought I would try another of his nonfictions. The billing on the book reads: "In 1632 an entire convent in the small French village of Loudon was apparently possessed by the devil. After a sensational and celebrated trial, the convent's charismatic priest Urban Grandier--accused of spiritually and sexually seducing the nuns in his charge--was convicted of being in league with Satan. Then he was burned at the stake for witchcraft.

                      In this classic work by the legendary Aldous Huxley--a remarkable story of religious and sexual obsession considered by many to be his nonfiction masterpiece--a compelling historical event is clarified and brought to vivid life."

                      I'll give you my impressions when I finish.
                      As promised, Huxley was as provocative in his history as he was in his biography [The Grey Eminence]. For serious readings outside my military history research, I look for personal lessons and perspectives. Here a few examples from the history:

                      "There are fashions in saints, just as there are fashions in medical treatment and women's hats."

                      "How much easier, how much more agreeable to trace each effect to a single and, if possible, a personal cause!"

                      "Gratuitously, for the mere pleasure of asserting himself, Grandier had offended a man [Cardinal Richelieu] who was very soon to become the absolute ruler in France."

                      "Such teleological suspensions of morality, as Kierkegaard elegantly calls them, are all very well in the Book of Genesis, but not in real life."

                      A last one which captured my experiences as a general staff officer for commanding generals--"By those who serve him, a great man must be treated as a mixture between a god, a naughty child and a wild beast. The god must be worshipped, the child amused and bamboozled and the wild beast placated and, when aroused, avoided. The courtier who, by an unwelcome suggestion, annoys this insane trinity of superhuman pretension, subhuman ferocity and infantile silliness, is merely asking for trouble."

                      The book also possessed the most graphic details that I have read of torture and burning at the stake, as well as exorcism, by the hands of the Church.

                      Recommend the edifying read.
                      Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

                      Comment


                      • In my escape reading, I just finished "The Girl in the Spider's Web" by David Lagercrantz, extending Stieg Larsson's Millennium trilogy series which started with The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. If you read and enjoyed the trilogy and lamented Larsson's death, you will be happy to know that Larsson's father and brother who inherited his estate had Lagercrantz pick up the popular series to do this book in 2015, and he will do another book to be released in 2017. The new author did a magnificent job staying true to the original characters and their backgrounds, he writing style is also a good copy. Enjoyed this latest book as well as the previous three.

                        To cover my main research reading, I have started taking notes for a book that I have wanted to do since before the 50th Anniversary of WWII, "The Red Army Rocket Troops: The Guards of Destruction" [a complement to my Red Army Tank Commanders: The Armored Guards done around the 50th Anniversary].
                        Last edited by R.N. Armstrong; 01 Dec 15, 13:14.
                        Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

                        Comment


                        • Hunting Hitler: New Scientific Evidence that Hitler Escaped Nazi Germany by Jerome R. Corsi
                          "I have never known a combat soldier who did not show a residue of war." --Sergeant Ed Stewart, 84th Division, US Army, WWII

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                          • Defeat in the East: The mark of Mao Tse-tung on war by Michael Elliot-Bateman (OUP 1967)

                            One of the most interesting books to come out of the 1960s on guerrilla/mobile warfare (or any sort of warfare, for that matter) in Communist revolutionary wars in East Asia and how Western armies ought to adapt to successfully fight such wars. It is an excellent survey and assessment of the subject. Absolutely riveting!

                            Link to Amazon entry: Defeat in the East: The mark of Mao Tse-tung on war
                            Last edited by Redzen; 15 Dec 15, 03:00. Reason: Add remarks & link.
                            在魔鬼和深蓝色的海洋之间. 悪魔と深海の間. Carpe hunc diem.

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                            • Young Men and Fire by Norman Maclean

                              Tells the true story of a crew of fifteen United States Forest Service elite airborne firefighters, the Smokejumpers in the Montana Wilderness. All but three died less than an hour after their jump at Mann Gulch.

                              http://www.amazon.com/Young-Men-Fire.../dp/0226500624
                              Last edited by 17thAirborneSon; 22 Dec 15, 17:55.
                              17thAirborneSon

                              "The horizon is unlimited." Major General Matthew Ridgeway

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                              • "Thirty Days In the Samarkand Desert with the Duchess of Kent" by AEJ Elliot, O.B.E.
                                For my wife, in treatment for pancreatic cancer. Thank you for your support.

                                https://www.gofundme.com/moving-moun...NPHmyoDrYlEkfE

                                Comment

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