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  • Bernard Cornwells THE EMPTY THRONE

    posted from mobile
    One death is a tragedy; one million is a statistic.

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    • Tumultuous Decade: Empire, Society, and Diplomacy in 1930s Japan

      From the Amazon blurb:
      The 1930s was a dark period in international affairs. The Great Depression affected the economic and social circumstances of the world’s major powers, contributing to armed conflicts such as the Spanish Civil War and the Second World War. This volume focuses exclusively on Japan, which witnessed a flurry of progressive activities in this period, activities which served both domestic and international society during the “tumultuous decade.”

      Featuring an interdisciplinary and international group of scholars, Tumultuous Decade examines Japanese domestic and foreign affairs between 1931 and 1941. It looks at Japan in the context of changing approaches to global governance, the rise of the League of Nations, and attempts to understand the Japanese worldview as it stood in the 1930s, a crucial period for Japan and the wider world. The editors argue that, like many other emerging powers at the time, Japan experienced a national identity crisis during this period and that this crisis is what ultimately precipitated Japan’s role in the Second World War as well as the global order that took shape in its aftermath.

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      • I just finished a couple of books.

        The German Way of War: From the Thirty Years' War to the Third Reich, and

        Churchill, Hitler, and "The Unnecessary War": How Britain Lost Its Empire and the West Lost the World
        Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedy. -- Ernest Benn

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        • THE SPY'S SON by Bryan Denson. Bought it yesterday and I am...

          Half-way through...

          http://www.amazon.ca/Spys-Son-Highes...HE+SPY%27S+SON

          I might be diabolically conspiratorial, probably more conspiratorial than Machiavelli, but I will not do what Nicholson did. Not that I am not prone to doing it. It will affect my loved ones like what happened to Nicholson's son, parents, sisters, brothers etc. My mother gets fired. My in laws get fired. My sister gets fired. My brother, my cousins, all get fired. And they will hunt me down. They will have me killed. And they have nothing to lose. Their lives are ruined. Not the law enforcement agency. All for purposes of practicality. That is why I don't betray my masters.
          Last edited by wilyfox; 25 May 15, 08:48.

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          • http://www.amazon.ca/Ingenious-Mr-Py...enious+mr+pyke

            A Classic Example of A Compromised Spy for England during World War 2.

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            • Gunboats on the Great River: A History of the Royal Navy on the Yangtse

              Interesting 'niche' history. Picked it up for its coverage of the RN and the Sino-Japanese struggles in the 1930s.

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              • Just finished Rescue at Los Banos by Bruce Henderson. It is about the raid to free thousands of civilian prisoners in the Philippines before the Japanese could murder them. The book goes tells about the lives of the internees and a history of the 11th Airborne Division. This is a good read.

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                • Right now I'm reading Joseph Balkoski's series of books on the 29th infantry. I would like some suggestions on books from the german perspective on D-day.

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                  • Ben Elton's 'Time and Time Again'.

                    It transformed my view on time travel as the book lead to new insights into the consequences of time travel (and I do not mean the butterfly effect).



                    Additionally it gave a very convincing picture of Berlin in 1914.
                    The 'Zeitgeist' was really astonishingly astute
                    BoRG

                    You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

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                    • The Angel of Auschwitz by S.A. Falconi
                      "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."- Sir Winston Churchill, about R.A.F. fighter pilots."
                      "It is well that war is so terrible, else we grow to fond of it." - Robert E. Lee

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                      • American sniper
                        By Chris Kyle
                        Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedy. -- Ernest Benn

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                        • THE TWO OCEAN WAR by Samuel Eliot Morison. It is an abridged synopsis of his complete 15 volume treatise of the naval aspects of the secon world war. Great read and an invaluable reference work.
                          ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
                          IN MARE IN COELO

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                          • Originally posted by CarpeDiem View Post


                            Gunboats on the Great River: A History of the Royal Navy on the Yangtse

                            Interesting 'niche' history. Picked it up for its coverage of the RN and the Sino-Japanese struggles in the 1930s.
                            Does this book have information about the incident in "The Sand Pebbles"?

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                            • Currently reading "A Bridge Too Far" again to prepare a History or Hollywood review. Incredible research by Cornelius Ryan and very well written. A masterpiece.

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                              • Originally posted by warmoviebuff View Post
                                Currently reading "A Bridge Too Far" again to prepare a History or Hollywood review. Incredible research by Cornelius Ryan and very well written. A masterpiece.

                                One of the first military history books I have read, I was given a copy when the film came out and I must of been about 10.
                                I'm a bit hazy on the dates but I do remember the surprise on my teachers face when I pulled the book out for reading time, a way for teachers to do nothing for an hour😆.

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