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  • Originally posted by Major Sennef View Post
    Winter Fire by William R. Trotter
    As I was very much taken in by his previous book (above), I ventured into reading a novel by the same author set in Finland during WW2.
    Being halfway now I consider it a hidden gem, very unlike what one would expect from a war novel though the battle scenes are excellent

    http://www.amazon.com/Winter-Fire-Wi...ds=winter+fire
    Thanks, I ordered it--looking for bedtime reading.
    Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
      Thanks, I ordered it--looking for bedtime reading.
      Great to hear Rick, you'll not regret.

      I hope I'll be able to finish mine here in Holland before my leave runs out
      BoRG

      You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

      Comment


      • Read that ...

        ... back in the early 80's, some time after "The Guns of August"; it's proven to be one of my favourites. I went on to read even more Tuchman, and the likes of Costain's Plantagenet series.

        Originally posted by Lokinar View Post
        `
        A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century - by Barabara Tuchman

        http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5...Distant_Mirror


        Seems like a bit more of a history of 14th century France than of the 14th century in general so far - I'm about 1/3 of the way into it.
        This might well be because Babs has chosen a peculiar narrative device for this work. Sort of centering her description of the era on one Enguerrand VII, the last Sieur de Coucy - a barony in Northern France - and making note of certain events in which he played a part. She regularly departs from the ongoing tale of this one fellow's life to describe other issues relevant to the time, though, and the chock-full-of-historical nuggets style ranging from the likely contents of the diet of peasants to the peculiar predilections of popes has proven quite amusing & informative.
        "I am Groot"
        - Groot

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        • Just started Red Storm Rising again. I don't know why but I really enjoy the book. I know it is fiction but to me it is enjoyable

          “Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth.” -- Albert Einstein

          The US Constitution doesn't need to be rewritten it needs to be reread

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          • War Crimes of the Deutsche Bank and the Dresdner Bank: Office of the Military Government (U.S.) Reports

            Picked this up second hand. Definitely not easy reading as it is quite dense and I've had to do some brushing up on my financial knowledge. However it does provide some primary source information on how Nazi Germany looted Europe and how its two largest banks essentially got away with it.

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            • Marlborough by Corelli Barnettt

              I downloaded ‘Marlborough’ by Corelli Barnett yesterday for free on my Kindle. I am a huge fan of Barnett’s writing – as most probably know, he is a fantastic historian so I was excited to see one of his books on promotion. This is quite a short non-fiction, but it is wonderfully readable. It examines the life of Britain’s greatest general, focusing on the character and personality of John Churchill. This new approach to his narrative was interesting, for example there is a focus on the relationship with his wife, his children, as well as his colleagues and those in his command. I would definitely recommend this to military history fans looking for a short, compelling bio. Does anyone else have any Churchill bio’s that they could recommend to me? Here is the blurb off of Amazon:
              The story of Britain's greatest general...as told by Britain's greatest military historian.

              John Churchill, the first Duke of Marlborough, was a man whose strategic genius and commanding personality transformed European history.

              In this remarkable book by the outstanding English military historian of his generation the individual behind the heroic victor of the Battle of Blenheim is bought vividly to life.

              In masterly detail, Correlli Barnett examines the forces that shaped the one European of the era able to challenge the glory of France's Sun King, and by so doing to deflect the course of history.

              The emphasis of the narrative is on the character and personality of John Churchill himself rather than on the general historical events of his life. By focusing on Marlborough's own reactions - to failure and success, to difficulty and disappointment, to the hazards of battle and political intrigue - the author presents him as his contemporaries and intimates knew him, in his roles of commander, diplomat, colleague, husband and father. A leading theme of the book is the Duke's relationship with his wife Sarah - a union that was both fascinating in itself and hugely significant for his career.

              The course of Marlborough's war leadership is narrated with the clarity, colour, pace and immediacy with which the author made his reputation in classic books such as 'The Desert Generals' and 'The Swordbearers', avoiding detailed technicalities, yet rendering Marlborough's talents and achievements explicable in terms of the military art of his time.

              The background of the book is the Europe of the early 1700s, an immensely exciting era, brilliant with new ideas, turbulent with rivalry and ambition, splendid with great architecture such as Blenheim Palace, the memorial of Marlborough's triumphs.

              For England it was the time of her rise to national greatness: a greatness resting equally on seapower, on commercial success and on her victorious armies on the continent of Europe, Throughout the book the contrast is made between this buoyant England, more and more Parliamentary in its government, prizing the liberty of the subject above the authority of monarchs, and the all-embracing autocratic state apparatus of Louis XIV's France, which, under Marlborough's leadership, England fought and defeated.

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              • Civilization: The West and the Rest - Niall Ferguson

                The series was quite interesting so I thought I'd give the book try.

                Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

                Questions about our site? See the FAQ.

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                • Two books on the go at the moment.


                  In the Service of the Emperor; Essays on the Imperial Japanese Army

                  A French Soldier's War Diary

                  Comment


                  • reading Blyth's A
                    History of Haiku, he says
                    more to me this time
                    Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
                      reading Blyth's A
                      History of Haiku, he says
                      more to me this time
                      I have that! That's a wonderful book. I love haiku, have a lot of books on them or collections.


                      I'm now reading Stanley Loomis' Paris in the Terror. He was a famous popular history writer of the last century and his account of the Flight to Varennes was so exciting that the suspense really tenses up the reader -- will they make it? Will they get away?

                      Doesn't matter that we know they didn't. What a writer.

                      This volume on The Terror concentrates on Charlotte Corday, who assassinated the disgusting Marat, in his bathtub soothing his chronic skin infections that he said were from hiding out in the sewers of Paris in 1789.

                      The bathtub was not a very nice place to receive a female visitor, so I figure he got what was coming to him. She was guillotined within days of the assassination, however (1793), and the Terror ran through the summer of 1794, so he'll have to jump to someone else as a focus pretty soon.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Phebe View Post
                        I have that! That's a wonderful book. I love haiku, have a lot of books on them or collections.
                        Blyth is a classic English scholar. Do you have his four volumes on seasonal Haiku?

                        I managed to publish two haiku from my Iraq war experience in Modern Haiku (to stay with the thread military theme):

                        (Saudi Arabia: X. 90)

                        Black tents with two eyes,
                        gliding through Arab markets--
                        invisible women

                        (Iraq: II. 91)

                        Monotonous sand,
                        scrub bushes litter the dunes--
                        Bedouin landmark

                        Always good to meet a kindred soul.
                        Last edited by R.N. Armstrong; 19 Nov 14, 08:17.
                        Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

                        Comment


                        • Just finish reading "The Empty Throne" by Bernard Cornwell.

                          If you are enjoying his continuing "Uthred" saga, you won't be disappointed...But then again, you probably already purchased the book.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
                            Blyth is a classic English scholar. Do you have his four volumes on seasonal Haiku?

                            I managed to publish two haiku from my Iraq war experience in Modern Haiku (to stay with the thread military theme):

                            (Saudi Arabia: X. 90)

                            Black tents with two eyes,
                            gliding through Arab markets--
                            invisible women

                            (Iraq: II. 91)

                            Monotonous sand,
                            scrub bushes litter the dunes--
                            Bedouin landmark

                            Always good to meet a kindred soul.
                            I like your first one particularly: highly visual, memorable.

                            I turned around in my chair and reached back to the first shelf at hand: Cherry Blossoms, the Peter Pauper Press. About 50 years ago, those four seasonal volumes, but they don't get old. Good translations. I looked and don't see the Blyth name, so I may not have his set.

                            Oh! I bet you mean he wrote four volumes of commentary on seasonal haikus! No, I don't have those.

                            I recently topped up my haiku and haiku history collection with some books by Jane Hirshfield; I think she's fairly new.

                            Comment


                            • "Red Winter" by Dan Smith.

                              http://www.amazon.com/Red-Winter-Nov...nter+Dan+Smith

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Phebe View Post
                                I like your first one particularly: highly visual, memorable.
                                Thank you.

                                I guess one had to be in the vast desert to appreciate the subtle variations that Bedouins must use to navigate without compass or GPS.
                                Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

                                Comment

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