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  • The Encyclopedia of French Tanks and Armoured Fighting Vehicles: 1914-1940.

    Francois Vauvillier is one of the best historians of French armour. This encyclopedia covers all the main types, prototypes, armoured cars, colonial vehicles and specialized armour such as mine clearers and engineering vehicles. It takes its place as the best English language resource on the subject.

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    • The Great Iron Trail: The Story of the First Trans-Continental Railroad by Robert West Howard.
      "I have never known a combat soldier who did not show a residue of war." --Sergeant Ed Stewart, 84th Division, US Army, WWII

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      • http://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Survi...Forces+tactics

        Second reading... and what I love most was the chapter on 'assembling detonators' which I recommended to my Islam brothers at the mosque.. I converted last year. Imams were so righteous I got scared of talking to them for I might offend them... We are all children of Abraham under one God - imam who believes in Christ..

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        • I do, and I also admit I detest the movie. It was not done properly, it did not totally go 'by the book.'


          Originally posted by Phebe View Post
          As long as you've admitted it.......... I've only read that one twice, but I'm on the third reading of Lev Grossman's "Codex." WHAT a novel.

          Also "Fatal Purity" by Ruth Scurr. It's a bio of Robespierre. S'okay, but I want to try the famous bio of him by Thompson next. I'm no admirer of Robespierre! But I want to understand how he got from Point A to Point B --- from defense of the king and opposition to the death penalty to his ruling The Terror with thousands of guillotine deaths he himself was responsible for.

          I am thinking he had got onto a tiger and he didn't know how to get off. Looking for confirmation, or some other explanation. He was certainly a paranoid, for years, and he had nervous breakdowns (but many did, stressful time) ----- still, thousands of people beheaded? Darn, the hooded terrorists of ISIS couldn't do that bad. What a disaster.

          This bass guitar kills TERRORISTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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          • The Bed of Procrustes: Philosophical and Practical Aphorisms

            Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

            Questions about our site? See the FAQ.

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            • Just finished reading Eric Cline's 1177 B.C.: the Year Civilization Collapsed.



              I enjoyed it somewhat, but it is way too small a book with 176 pages of text (or about 50,000 words or so), but is well researched (twenty pages of end notes). Cline starts out with a general description of Ramses III's defeat of the Sea Peoples in 1177 BC, but unfortunately, most of his descriptions are overly general even on events that we know much more about. Most of the book is arguing and showing how "globalized" the Ancient Near and Middle East was during the Bronze Age, and generally how interdependent the various nations were. He gives general overviews of the main powers of the Late Bronze Age focusing on Mycenaean Greece, Egypt, the Hittite Empire, the Assyrians, and Kassite Babylon. Also goes much into how important Cyprus was as part of the "global" market.

              Cline then goes on to discuss the various collapses of the various states (in a very general way) and analyzes modern authority as to the causes. In all he builds towards a climatic finish


              An interesting side bar is his qualified belief that the Trojan War probably happened in the 15th Century BC (i.e. ca. 1430 BC).

              Overall, it is generally informative about international trade and relations in the Late Bronze Age, but lacks substance on the actual events which he could have gone into more detail. The biggest problem though is that he qualifies everyone of his arguments.

              I'm glad I bought the book, but also glad it was fairly inexpensive (at about $20.00 U.S. hard back) as well.

              Michael
              Last edited by Cyan67; 01 Oct 14, 20:47.

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              • Elric of Melnibone, the complete saga.



                Oh, and this:

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                • Sword of Honour trilogy Evelyn Waugh.
                  I often think how much easier the world would have been to manage if Herr Hitler and Signor Mussolini had been at Oxford. Lord Halifax

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                  • "The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl: How Two Brave Scientists Battled Typhus and Sabotaged the Nazis" by Arthur Allen.

                    http://www.amazon.com/The-Fantastic-...y+of+dr.+weigl

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                    • New book by aviation historian Brian Cull looking at the Malta reconnaissance squadrons flying the Martin Maryland. Also includes a study of Adrian Warburton.

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                      • I just started reading Empire Falls by Richard Russo.
                        "I have never known a combat soldier who did not show a residue of war." --Sergeant Ed Stewart, 84th Division, US Army, WWII

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                        • The Last Valley by Martin Windrow.
                          "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

                          Homer


                          BoRG

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                          • Originally posted by ktnbs View Post
                            Sword of Honour trilogy Evelyn Waugh.
                            They age remarkably well don't they?
                            BoRG

                            You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

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                            • Frozen Hell by William Trotter.


                              A very readable book about the Russo-Finnish winter War of 1939 - 1940.
                              Though the writer sympathizes with the Finns, but then who wouldn't?
                              he gives a balanced coverage of the diplomatic and military aspects of the conflict.
                              The famous 'Motti tactics' in particular are well explained.

                              At this moment I have a preference for books that cover topics far removed from heat and flies
                              Attached Files
                              BoRG

                              You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

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                              • Command and Control by Eric Schlosser....Nuclear Weapons andn the Illusion of Safety ......

                                Interesting and eye opening....If this was going on in the USA and Western Europe what the hell was happening on the Russian side....A good interesting read on what might have been.

                                SAC managing to lose nuclear bombs and aircraft, systems that almost fired themselves, systems that didnt fire, nuclear bombs that didnt go off by accident and in some cases by design (test firing) and America almost starting a nuclear war by accident and in a couple of cases, by design on some other occasions instigated by the political thinking and fear and covers "the mixture of human fallibility and technological complexity that can lead to disaster"....

                                Americans were not such nice guys after all and have or had some real nut cases running the establisment.....

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