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  • I just finished John Mosier's Myth of the Great War and it has some interesting things to say and was a new view of the war for me.

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    • Swastika over the Acropolis: Re-interpreting the Nazi invasion of Greece in World War II

      Interesting observations on German use of armour and a nice study in English of the actions of the Greek Army.

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      • Originally posted by CarpeDiem View Post


        Swastika over the Acropolis: Re-interpreting the Nazi invasion of Greece in World War II

        Interesting observations on German use of armour and a nice study in English of the actions of the Greek Army.
        Thanks.

        Inside Hitler's Greece: The Experience of Occupation, 1941-44 by Mark Mazower
        is still on my 'to read' list, this one could be considered a prequel I guess.
        BoRG

        You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

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        • Reading the 633 Squadron book series. (I wanted to do that for some time.Thanks Amazon!)

          Quick, easily believable fiction and entertaining read about a Mosquito squadron adventures. Somehow the 633 Squadron movie theme song keeps creeping up in my head during the action phases in the books!

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          • just started this one

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            • Deadly Embrace Morocco and the Road to the Spanish Civil War


              Looks at how Spain's war in Morocco foreshadows actions in the Spanish Civil War

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              • After having been waiting patiently on reserve at the local library for the last 6 weeks, "Quartered Safe Out Here" finally is mine for the next 3 weeks. For those who are not familiar it is the memoirs of George MacDonald Fraser of "Flashman" fame regarding life in Burma 1944-45. After reading the first 100 pages I will say the closest WW II memoir would be "Those Devils in Baggy Pants" by Ross Carter, albeit with North Country dialect and the vernacular of the Border Regiment. The names are pseudonyms, "to protect the virtue" of the real participants, and it is a great "grunts eye view" that makes a great bookend to General Slim's autobio of the same campaign.
                Last edited by Lance Williams; 13 Aug 14, 13:28.
                Lance W.

                Peace through superior firepower.

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                • Finally: Blairs Silent Victory
                  One death is a tragedy; one million is a statistic.

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                  • I'm currently reading several books. Still on W Bruce Lincoln's Red Victory as mentioned earlier, but have also started reading Terence Zuber's The Mons Myth.

                    Zuber is typically Zuber (being about as diplomatic as a beered up deep sea fisherman), but most of his points are sound, and he his pretty hard on German First Army leadership. If accurate, Mons-La Cateau are foreshadows of von Kluck's decisions on the Marne.

                    While I have been reading through the two books above (rotating as my humor fits), I have begun Prelude to Blitzkrieg: The 1916 Austro-German Campaign in Romania



                    I'm still in the early stages of the book, but the first criticism I have is that he starts pretty much right off with the Romania declaration of war and the subsequent invasion of Hungarian Transylvania. There is a "flashback" to the events leading to the Declaration of War, but it is brief and so needs to be flushed out more. This is especially true as the author, Michael Barrett, has done a great deal of research in Romanian Archives. The book itself is pretty much an operation history and is quite detailed as to all sides in the campaign. I highly recommend it, but that is almost a given because it is, I believe, the only full history of the Romanian Campaign in the English language.

                    One thing that will help is a good knowledge of Romanian geography. This is made "easier" by the fact that Barrett decided on the convention of using the Romanian names for cities etc. Some of the more important ones are noted parenthetically their more used "Austrian" names, but he notes that each city usually had three different names.

                    Michael P Reed

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                    • I just finished The French Revolutionary Wars in the Essential History line, and currently I am reading French Revolutionary Infantry 1789-1802 in the Men-at-Arms series. This is part of my quest to chronologically tackle my Napoleonic war books.

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                      • Early this morning I finished James Schneider's "Guerilla Leader: T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt". His opening relates an insightful conversation (which I have posted on another thread in relation to the value of reading classics).

                        In the fall of 1946 the French General Raoul Salan was talking with Vietnamese guerilla leader Vo Nguyen Giap during negotiations for the return of French authority. Salan wanted to know the source and inspiration of Giaps success in resisting the Japanese occupation of Indochina since 1940. Giap replied, My fighting gospel is T.E. Lawrences Seven Pillars of Wisdom. I am never without it.
                        Intrigued, Salan asked how a book about guerilla warfare in the desert could possibly find expression in the jungles of Vietnam.
                        Ah, Giap replied. Is that your assessment of Lawrence?
                        Salan nodded, Of course.
                        Then you have missed the whole point of Lawrence, said Giap. He is less about fighting a guerilla war than leading one. And, leadership is applicable in any context: desert or jungle, military or civil.

                        Schneider proceeds through Lawrence's Seven Pillars noting and discussing the leadership lessons to be gained. It has been one of the most refreshing and penetrating piece of military history that I have read in a long time. While I have read Lawrence's Chapter XXXIII many times, Schneider may have saved me re-reading the whole tome a third time--since I, too, focused on what Lawrence had to say about guerilla warfare since I saw his theory echoed in Bin Laden's global assault on the "minerals" of the US.
                        Last edited by R.N. Armstrong; 20 Aug 14, 08:36.
                        Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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                        • Hi all just got the two volumes,,, repairing the Panzer 1 & 2 by Lukas Friedli
                          Very detailed books. Anyone have them????














                          IT

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                          • In the fall of 1946 the French General Raoul Salan was talking with Vietnamese guerilla leader Vo Nguyen Giap during negotiations for the return of French authority. Salan wanted to know the source and inspiration of Giaps success in resisting the Japanese occupation of Indochina since 1940. Giap replied, My fighting gospel is T.E. Lawrences Seven Pillars of Wisdom. I am never without it.
                            Interesting quote R.N. This inquiring mind would be very interested in knowing what the Viet Minh record was in "resisting the Japanese occupation of Indochina". Given that for most of the war, up until 9 March 1945, the Japanese governed Indochina through the Vichy Colonial authorities. Following the March 1945 coup, they recognized puppet states, to include the Nguyen dynasty's Bao Dai, and for the first time were openly in charge. At the beginning of 1945 there were supposedly only 30,000 Japanese troops in Indochina, though reinforcements kept arriving as understrength Japanese units were brought in from other parts of Southeast Asia.

                            The point being that the Japanese hardly had a robust presence in Indochina, and they were under heavy pressure from Allied (principally U.S.) air strikes and naval interdiction operations. Communications between the three Vietnams alone were haphazard at best, a factor which impacted upon the Indochinese COmmunist Party's inter-regional communications. Add to that the fact that Ho Chi Minh and the Party leadership had already judged Japan to be losing the war, and therefore not worthy of serious effort. This is not to say that the Central Committee hadn't made plans to tackle the Japanese, they did. But their plans were aimed at expanding their guerrilla bases now that the French were out of the picture and no longer the threat that they had been right up until early 1945, and broadening the political base of the Vietminh Front. (See Duiker's Ho Chi Minh, pp. 295-96, and 299.) Their intention was to launch a national insurrection timed to Japan's collapse or the arrival of a Allied invasion force.

                            My reading of Duiker, Quinn-Judge, and Marr leads me to the conclusion that the wartime Viet Minh were far more interested in appearing as an anti-Japanese guerrilla force to the Allies, thereby gaining their support, while they extended their political base into the vacuum caused by the March 1945 Japanese coup. And not coincidentally, killing off any capable non-Communist nationalist leadership, principally among the VNQDD.
                            dit: Lirelou

                            Phong trần mi một lưỡi gươm, Những loi gi o ti cơm s g!

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                            • Originally posted by lirelou View Post
                              Interesting quote R.N. This inquiring mind would be very interested in knowing what the Viet Minh record was in "resisting the Japanese occupation of Indochina". Given that for most of the war, up until 9 March 1945, the Japanese governed Indochina through the Vichy Colonial authorities. Following the March 1945 coup, they recognized puppet states, to include the Nguyen dynasty's Bao Dai, and for the first time were openly in charge. At the beginning of 1945 there were supposedly only 30,000 Japanese troops in Indochina, though reinforcements kept arriving as understrength Japanese units were brought in from other parts of Southeast Asia.
                              Don't know, myself, the resistance story. I've ordered Davidson's history of Vietnam War since Schneider cites Davidson for the Salan conversation.
                              Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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                              • R.N., There's no doubt about Giap reading Lawrence, nor of Giap telling Salan that Lawrence was his guide and that he always carried his copy with him. What I cannot find is any quote that relates it to any VM campaign against the Japanese. One assumes Salan would be privy to any such campaign, or its absence. It's always possible that Salan used the Japanese as a Trojan horse to elicit evidence of Giap's military training and background.

                                Just received my copy of Tran Ngoc Chau's book Vietnam Labyrinth. In the preface he talks about the VM war against the French from 1943 on as part of a Viet Minh Youth organization. He does not mention the Japanese except in passing. Perhaps there's some mention further on.
                                dit: Lirelou

                                Phong trần mi một lưỡi gươm, Những loi gi o ti cơm s g!

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