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  • Excellent. Thoroughly researched and fully footnoted account of a little known but absolutely vital battle.

    Also sheds new light on Gort's decision to head to Dunkirk and evacuation.

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    • China's Warlords

      Finally managed to find a cheap used copy of this book. Deserves a reprint.

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      • I recently got the book "Deception: The Untold Story of East-West Espionage Today" by Edward Lucas.

        http://www.amazon.com/Deception-Unto...tion+east+west

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        • Jeffrey Verhey - 'The Spirit Of 1914'

          Historians engaged in local histories on First World War Germany have
          suggested, however, that the mood of the population in July and August
          1914 cannot be adequately explained by the adjective “enthusiastic.”
          Signing out.

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          • Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

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            • Hungarian Fighter Colours Vol. 2


              More than just a book on markings, a history of each type's use by the Hungarian Air Force. Written by two experts in the field, this book also includes appendices on aces (with list of kills), unit structure of HAF and an explanation of how a profile of a Me210Ca-1 was reconstructed. Together with volume one, must haves for anyone interested in the subject.

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              • I just started reading Bitter Glory: Poland and Its Fate 1918-1939 by Richard M. Watt.
                "I have never known a combat soldier who did not show a residue of war." --Sergeant Ed Stewart, 84th Division, US Army, WWII

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                • Originally posted by Greybriar View Post
                  I just started reading Bitter Glory: Poland and Its Fate 1918-1939 by Richard M. Watt.
                  Good read. While generally sympathetic to Poland's fate, Watt also points out that 1930s Poland was largely responsible for that fate through bad decisions and falsely believing it was more than third level power.
                  The Purist

                  Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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                  • "Rubicon", by Tom Holland

                    The last years of the Roman Republic and a certain Julian Caesar
                    The Purist

                    Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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                    • Originally posted by The Purist View Post
                      "Rubicon", by Tom Holland

                      The last years of the Roman Republic and a certain Julian Caesar
                      Read it last year and loved it.
                      ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

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                      • I'm reading "Danton" by David Lawday, the go-to bio of Danton. Lawday also did Talleyrand (Napoleon's Master) and he really liked Talleyrand, but he doesn't like Danton, and that is unusual for a biographer not to like his subject.

                        He keeps making excuses for Danton. They don't persuade, somehow.

                        I recommend this book for students of the French Revolution. I do feel with this book (no. 14 or so) I am beginning to grok the French Revolution, to get a feel for what in the world happened there.

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                        • Originally posted by The Purist View Post
                          Good read. While generally sympathetic to Poland's fate, Watt also points out that 1930s Poland was largely responsible for that fate through bad decisions and falsely believing it was more than third level power.
                          Yes a good read. The many governments did themselves no favors with all the in- house bickering
                          "War is sorrowful, but there is one thing infinitely more horrible than the worst horrors of war, and that is the feeling that nothing is worth fighting for..."
                          -- Harper's Weekly, December 31, 1864

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                          • Mud: A Military History

                            Found second hand and picked up just because it's an unusual subject.

                            From Amazon:
                            Napoleon delayed his attack at Waterloo to allow the mud to dry. Had he attacked earlier, he might have defeated Wellington before Blücher arrived. In November 1942, Russian mud stopped the Germans, who could not advance again until the temperature dropped low enough to freeze the mud. During the Vietnam War, "Project Popeye" was an American attempt to lengthen the monsoon and cause delays on the Ho Chi Minh Trail.

                            Soldiers have always known just how significant mud can be in war. But historians have not fully recognized its importance, and few have discussed the phenomenon in more than a passing manner. Only three books-Military Geography(by John Collins),Battling the Elements(by Harold Winters et al.), and Battlegrounds) (edited by Michael Stephenson)- have addressed it at any length and then only as part of the entire environment's effect on the battlefield. None of these books analyzed mud's influence on the individual combatant.

                            Mud: A Military History first defines the substance's very different types. Then it examines their specific effects on mobility and on soldiers and their equipment over the centuries and throughout the world. From the Russian rasputiza to the Southeast Asian monsoon, C. E. Wood demonstrates mud's profound impact on the course of military history. Citing numerous veterans' memoirs, archival sources, personal interviews, and historical sources, soldier-scholar Wood pays particular attention to mud's effect on combatants' morale, health, and fatigue. His book is for all infantrymen-past, present, or the clean, dry, comfortable armchair variety.

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                            • Just started this: Just got to page 43, quite good so far.

                              HONNEUR ET FIDÉLITÉ

                              "Believe me, nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won." - Duke of Wellington at Waterloo.

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                              • Originally posted by Dogsbody67 View Post
                                Just started this: Just got to page 43, quite good so far.

                                I've got a much earlier edition. It's a fine read.
                                Signing out.

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