Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What are you currently reading?

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by tigerace43 View Post
    Them titties.... lol.
    Those would be Lady Justice's, see scales and blindfold while her sword seems to be missing altogether.

    Here she's shown with all her assets

    BoRG

    You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

    Comment


    • Just finished The Duck Commander Family by Willie and Korie Robertson...pretty good. Phil's got a book out now and I hope to read it next. Really looking forward to October; that's when Uncle Si's book comes out.
      SGT, 210th MP Battalion, 2nd MP BDE, MSSG

      Fervently PRO-TRUMP, anti-Islam and anti-Steelers!

      Comment


      • The 1000 Mile War: World War II in Alaska and The Aleutians by Brian Garfield.
        "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

        Homer


        BoRG

        Comment


        • The Age of Napoleon, by Herold
          "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence."
          John Adams, 1770

          Comment


          • Starting Into the Fire: Dakota Meyer
            Skip

            Comment


            • Quartered Safe out Here by George MacDonald Fraser, about his service in Burma during World War Two.

              You, the mothers, who sent their sons from faraway countries wipe away your tears; your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace, after having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well.

              -- Ataturk

              Comment


              • Sophie Scholl and the White Rose. The only problem is that its more about Hans Scholl.

                Comment


                • Caliban's War by James S.A. Corey

                  Loving this series so far. These the first book and this one have single-handedly jump started my fiction reading again. It's been awhile since I read anything besides history and the like.

                  ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Major Mannfred View Post
                    Bismarck by Edward Crankshaw. Looks to be a long summer read and very interesting so far.

                    Say, I picked up a hardcover edition of Bismarck at a used book sale for about 25 cents ($3 for however many books one could fit into a bag). I'll have to bump it up to next on my list to read, since I'm due for another non-fiction work after finishing the book I'm about 90% of the way through -


                    It's one of the more peculiar things I've read, but for whatever reason, I've found it interesting enough to continue.
                    The story follows the adventures of a fictional "Cyrus Spitama", an Achaemenid Persian diplomat of the 6th-5th century BCE who travels the known world comparing the political and religious beliefs of various nation states of the time. Over the course of his life, he meets many influential philosophical figures of his time, including Zoroaster, Socrates, the Buddha, Mahavira, Lao Tsu, and Confucius.
                    Cyrus, who is the grandson of Zoroaster and who survives his murder, grows up at the Achaemenid court as a quasi-noble, and becomes a close friend of his schoolmate Xerxes. Because of Cyrus' talent for languages, the Achaemenid King, Darius I, sends him as an ambassador to certain kingdoms in India, but Cyrus is more interested in the many religious theories he encounters there than in establishing profitable trade relations for Darius. After coming to power, Cyrus' former schoolmate, now King Xerxes I, sends Cyrus to China, where he spends several years as a captive and "honored guest" in one of the warring states of the Middle Kingdom, and spends a great deal of time with Confucius. Upon returning home, Cyrus witnesses the defeat of Xerxes and the end of the Greco-Persian wars. Cyrus then goes into retirement, but is called upon by Xerxes' successor, Artaxerxes I, to serve as ambassador to Athens and witness to the secret peace treaty between Pericles and himself.
                    The story is related in the first person as recalled to his Greek great-nephew Democritus. Cyrus's recollection is said to be motivated in part by his desire to set the record straight following the publication by Herodotus of an account of the Greco-Persian wars.

                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creation_(novel)
                    " Reality is interpretation according to a scheme which we cannot escape "

                    Comment


                    • Still slogging my way through Les Mes, its a long book!!!
                      "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence."
                      John Adams, 1770

                      Comment


                      • Currently reading Citizen Soldiers by Stephen Ambrose.


                        And just ordered Battleground Pacific: A Marine Rifleman's Combat Odyssey in K/3/5 by Sterling Mace (the author was a BAR gunner in the same company as E.B. Sledge during Peleliu and Okinawa) and If You Survive: From Normandy to the Battle of the Bulge to the End of World War II, One American Officer's Riveting True Story by George Wilson.


                        You, the mothers, who sent their sons from faraway countries wipe away your tears; your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace, after having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well.

                        -- Ataturk

                        Comment


                        • 1776 by David McCullough

                          "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

                          Homer


                          BoRG

                          Comment


                          • "War is sorrowful, but there is one thing infinitely more horrible than the worst horrors of war, and that is the feeling that nothing is worth fighting for..."
                            -- Harper's Weekly, December 31, 1864

                            Comment


                            • Habibi by Craig Thompson



                              Elegant and fascinating; tender & brutal.
                              Meticously drawn and captivating narrative with deeper layers and exotic settings.
                              Could easily become the finest comic of this decade
                              Last edited by Colonel Sennef; 12 Jun 13, 13:24.
                              BoRG

                              You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

                              Comment




                              • The Philippine Army is often neglected in coverage of the early Pacific war. This book looks at its development and combat history.

                                Comment

                                Latest Topics

                                Collapse

                                Working...
                                X