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  • Just finishing up 'How Great Generals Win' by Bevin Alexander. I still have Keegan's 'First World War' to read, but I haven't been that motivated to read it lately. Once Matrix Games 'Guns of August' gets closer to release I will probably tackle it.

    New additions to the Military History wing of the personal library that need to be read sometime in the future:

    John Toland's 'The Rising Sun' and 'In Mortal Combat'
    Patton's 'War as I knew it'
    Hans Delbruk's 4 volume military history set
    'Battle Tactics of the Civil War' by Paddy Griffith
    Keegan's 'The Face of Battle' and 'The Mask of Command'
    MacDonald's 'Company Commander'
    Bevin Alexander's 'Korea'
    'Monte Cassino' by Matthew Parker
    '1812' by Walter Borneman
    Richard Frank's 'Guadalcanal'
    Eisenhower's 'Bitter Woods'
    Max Hastings' 'Armageddon'

    So much to read, so many games to play, so little time
    "When they get in trouble they send for the sonsabitches." - Admiral King

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    • "Wot! No Engines?" by Alan Cooper, a book about the RAF Glider Pilots who were involved in Operation Varsity, as well as all the other glider pilots and passengers on that fateful day in March '45. £18 new from a few sources, and well worth a read!

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      • Finished 'How Great Generals Win'. Now reading 'The Crossing of the Suez' by Lt. Gen. Saad El Shazly.
        "When they get in trouble they send for the sonsabitches." - Admiral King

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        • Two new books

          I have picked up two new books (at least in my collection) Rommel and Patton Men of War in the 20th Century and Enemy at the Gates the great battle of Stalingrad.

          CD
          "History does not entrust the care of freedom to the weak or timid." Dwight D. Eisenhower

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          • Military History Quarterly (MHQ), August and Winter 05 issues.

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            • I have been enthralled by Adam Zamoyski's "Moscow, 1812". If you haven't (or even if you have) read an indepth work on this campaign you must pick up this book. It is incredibly informative and points out how badly both sides handled the overall campaign. Napoleon was hardly at his best and Kutusov and the Russians generals threw away a change to utterly destroy Napoleon and his army.

              Something over 600 pages long but it flows beautifully.
              The Purist

              Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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              • Just finished Utter's Battalion by LTC Alex Lee, the history of the first year in Vietnam of 2/7 Marines. I was surprised to discover the derelict state of the USMC prior to Vietnam and the huge logistical feat it was to deploy a full Regimental Landing Team overseas. I recommend it to everyone interested in Marine Corps history, very well writen by a forceful and opiniated ex-officer of the battalion.

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                • Reading Douglas Porch's The Path to Victory and anxiously awaiting Edson's Raiders: The 1st Marine Raider Battalion in World War II by Col. Joseph Alexander. Ooh-rah.

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                  • "MacArthur and the Defeat in the Phillipines" by Richard Connaughton.

                    It came highly recommended as a very balanced look at MacArthur and how he handled the defence of the Phiullipines.
                    The Purist

                    Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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                    • Britain's Forgotten Wars, Colonial campaigns of the 19th Century.

                      Ian Hernon,

                      Sutton Publishing 2003

                      ISBN 0 7509 3162 0

                      I rummaged around to find it to reply to this thread on the Riel Rebellion, and I had forgotten how many "odd" campaigns it covers. In many cases the most deadly dangers to the troops are their own incompetent officers and/or the (usually non-existant) logistics & medical care. I still can't work out why one chapter is devoted to the "Modoc War" as this was an exclusively US affair.
                      Andy "Weeble" Weaver

                      Research, Reference and Historical Study

                      Illud Latine dici non potest

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                      • Grenadiers by Kurt 'Panzer' Meyer.

                        Interesting account of fighting by someone who fought on all fronts (except the African).

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                        • Originally posted by creeping death
                          I have picked up two new books (at least in my collection) Rommel and Patton Men of War in the 20th Century and Enemy at the Gates the great battle of Stalingrad.

                          CD
                          You'll enjoy Enemy at the Gates. It ranks as one of my favorite books now!

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                          • I'm now reading anything that I can get my hands into that might be remoted related to Napoleon. I'm going
                            All warfare is based on deception.
                            Sun Tzu - Art of war - Chapter One - Laying Plans


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                            • I'm half way through Crossing the Suez by Saad El Shazly, and about a 1/3 into Steel my Soldiers' Hearts by David Hackworth. Crossing the Suez is an interesting read, but I wish he would spend less time taking shots at other Egyptians and defending himself, and just concentrate on the operational aspects. It makes it harder to tell what is fluff and what is truth in what he is saying. Hackworth's book about his taking over command of 4/39th Inf in 1969 has been a good read so far.
                              "When they get in trouble they send for the sonsabitches." - Admiral King

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                              • Originally posted by vyshka
                                I'm half way through Crossing the Suez by Saad El Shazly, and about a 1/3 into Steel my Soldiers' Hearts by David Hackworth. Crossing the Suez is an interesting read, but I wish he would spend less time taking shots at other Egyptians and defending himself, and just concentrate on the operational aspects. It makes it harder to tell what is fluff and what is truth in what he is saying. Hackworth's book about his taking over command of 4/39th Inf in 1969 has been a good read so far.
                                I was thinking of getting Steel My Soldier's Hearts one of these days, does it deal with the whole tour of 4/39 Inf? there is few books dealing with the War in the northern Mekong Delta, especially with this unit that wasn't part of the MRF.

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