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  • The Story of Our War With Spain

    The Story of Our War With Spain, by Eldridge S. Brooks, (c)1899, Lothrop Publishing Company.

    When reading this account of the war, I had to remind myself that this was a story of the war, not a history. As such, the book is filled with flag-waving rhetoric, and enemy-bashing.

    What I found truly amazing, was how similar the road to war with Spain, was with the road to war with Iraq. The public and private attitudes and opinions. The political environment, and the need to carefully orchestrate public opinion to make it a popular war.

    I wouldn't call the book riveting, but it is certainly a page turner. It is an easy read, as the style is, as mentioned, not a history. Therefore, the author added color and flourish to help illustrate his points.

    I will write something in more detail later, when I have time to do a thorough review.

    Beyond the subject matter, and the copyright, what I found most intriguing, was the inscription inside the front cover:
    Presented to the
    Admiral Geo. B. Dewey.
    Aux #84
    by
    Dept. Chaplain
    Deborah Ziegenbalg.
    May 16 1931

    Inscription

    Admiral Dewey of Manila fame, died in 1916. His son had a different middle name. I am wondering if perhaps this was a grandson, or a nephew. So far, I have not found anything on the web about Admiral George B. Dewey.
    Retreat hell, we just got here. Every Marine, a rifleman.

    Never let the facts get in the way of the truth.

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    • Originally posted by Iron Mike USMC
      Beyond the subject matter, and the copyright, what I found most intriguing, was the inscription inside the front cover:
      Presented to the
      Admiral Geo. B. Dewey.
      Aux #84
      by
      Dept. Chaplain
      Deborah Ziegenbalg.
      May 16 1931

      Inscription

      Admiral Dewey of Manila fame, died in 1916. His son had a different middle name. I am wondering if perhaps this was a grandson, or a nephew. So far, I have not found anything on the web about Admiral George B. Dewey.
      Could it relate to a 1931 Branch of:

      "American Legion Auxiliary" #84, "Admiral Geo. B. Dewey"

      http://www.legion-aux.org/index.htm

      That would seem to fit with the rest of the inscription, as I note they are split into regional "Departments".
      Andy "Weeble" Weaver

      Research, Reference and Historical Study

      Illud Latine dici non potest

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Weeble
        Could it relate to a 1931 Branch of:

        "American Legion Auxiliary" #84, "Admiral Geo. B. Dewey"

        http://www.legion-aux.org/index.htm

        That would seem to fit with the rest of the inscription, as I note they are split into regional "Departments".
        Good idea, but not quite. American Legion Post #84 is the Richard W. Townsend post. My next step is to see if veterans of the Spanish-American War had their own organization.

        Thanks
        Retreat hell, we just got here. Every Marine, a rifleman.

        Never let the facts get in the way of the truth.

        Comment


        • Achtung-Panzer!

          Achtung-Panzer!:
          by Heinz Guderian (1937)

          The original critique of WW1 armoured tactics and how they, and the lessons being learned in Britain should be applied to the growing forces of Post-Versailles 'Diktat' Germany.

          Guderian had an 'agenda' - to prevent the cavalry taking all the motorised assets for the "Light Divisions", rather than fully expanding the nascent Panzer divisions, his worries were finally accepted after the Polish campaign.

          Germany's paucity of armour is seen in Guderian, a radio specialist, being appointed the Staff College lecturer on armour in 1927, two years before he even sat in a working tank ( a LKII in Sweden).

          This was the book that laid down the base-rules for armoured warfare in Germany, openly copied from Fuller's British experience.

          An indespensible read for historians of armour and armoured tactics, it shows how Germany followed the (largely abandoned and ignored) experiments of the Royal Armoured Corps in the 20's and early 30's to their logical conclusion.

          The dismissal of the French "Infantry tank" organisation, and the call for fully mobile armoured artillery and infantry to accompany the tanks, with associated air support show that, to a large extent, Guderian finally got his way.


          (Cassell Military Classics) (Paperback)
          Paperback: 220 pages
          Publisher: Sterling; New Ed edition (June 30, 2000)
          Language: English
          ISBN: 0304352853
          Andy "Weeble" Weaver

          Research, Reference and Historical Study

          Illud Latine dici non potest

          Comment


          • The Ghosts of Medak Pocket: The Story of Canada's Secret War by Carol Off.

            http://www.randomhouse.ca/catalog/di...=9780679312949
            In 1993, Canadian peacekeepers in Croatia were plunged into the most significant fighting Canada had seen since the Korean War. Their extraordinary heroism was covered up and forgotten. The ghosts of that battlefield have haunted them ever since.

            Canadian peacekeepers in Medak Pocket, Croatia, found no peace to keep in September 1993. They engaged the forces of ethnic cleansing in a deadly firefight and drove them from the area under United Nations protection. The soldiers should have returned home as heroes. Instead, they arrived under a cloud of suspicion and silence.

            In Medak Pocket, members of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry did exactly the job they were trained — and ordered — to do. When attacked by the Croat army they returned fire and fought back valiantly to protect Serbian civilians and to save the UN mandate in Croatia. Then they confronted the horrors of the offensive’s aftermath — the annihilation by the Croat army of Serbian villages. The Canadians searched for survivors. There were none.

            The soldiers came home haunted by these atrocities, but in the wake of the Somalia affair, Canada had no time for soldiers’ stories of the horrific compromises of battle — the peacekeepers were silenced. In time, the dark secrets of Medak’s horrors drove many of these soldiers to despair, to homelessness and even suicide.

            Award-winning journalist Carol Off brings to life this decisive battle of the Canadian Forces. The Ghosts of Medak Pocket is the complete and untold story.
            It covers a description of the battle and also has a good background of the conflict. Like Churchill said, the area has more history than it can swallow.
            Last edited by Duncan; 07 Nov 05, 02:39.

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            • Just finished: Imperial Grunts: The American Military on the Ground by Robert D. Kaplan

              Kaplan has spent several years embedded with US troops fighting the "Small Wars" of the world's lone super-power. This is the first of a series of planned books on his travels with the US military.


              Just started: Roberts Ridge: A Story of Courage and Sacrifice on Takur Ghar Mountain, Afghanistan by Malcom MacPherson

              During Operation Anaconda a rescue mission turned into a fight for survival on the part of small groups of US Navy SEALS, Army Rangers, Night Stalkers and USAF Combat Controllers. I just started this book...It is harder to put down than Blackhawk Down was.

              Next up: The Savage Wars of Peace: Small Wars and the Rise of American Power by Max Boot

              From the Barbary Pirates to the 21st Century...This book was a frequent reference of Kaplan's Imperial Grunts.
              Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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              • Finished 'Infantry Combat' by Antal. Almost done with 'Calhamer on Diplomacy'. Started up 'Tank Attacks' by Antal. Still working on Keegan's 'First World War'.

                I just picked up 'Panzer Operations', which is the memoirs of Erhard Raus. When did people decide that cheap looking computer generated maps would be better than hand drawn ones in books? I am guessing that they were created in the word processor that was used for the rest of the book, but they look horrid.
                "When they get in trouble they send for the sonsabitches." - Admiral King

                Comment


                • Starting- Spare Parts: A Marine Reservists Journey From Campus to Combat in 38 Days by Buzz Williams
                  The book is about a Marine LAV crewman who is called up from the reserves and deployed to Iraq in the first Gulf War. From the title it sounded like a disgruntled Marine who was pissed off about getting yanked out of his regular life to fight, but the guy is actually a Marine through and through. In fact he hints in his dedication that he hopes his two children may become Marines. Has my interest so far.

                  Coming Soon: either No True Glory by Bing West or Brotherhood of Heroes by Bill Sloan.(I'm workin' on a Marine Corps readin' list if ya' hadn't noticed)
                  To whispers of Beethoven...

                  "Mein Gott! Die Invasion. Sie kommen!"
                  -Werner Pluskat

                  Comment


                  • Finished 'Calhamer on Diplomacy' and 'Armor Attacks'. Starting 'First World War' by Keegan again b/c I hadn't read that much and it has been a while. I just picked up 'The Crossing of the Suez' by Saad El Shazly. He planned and commanded the Egyptian attack in the '73 war.
                    "When they get in trouble they send for the sonsabitches." - Admiral King

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                    • I am currently reading "Visions Of Victory" and "Slaughterhouse"

                      Jeff

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by vyshka
                        Finished 'Calhamer on Diplomacy' and 'Armor Attacks'. Starting 'First World War' by Keegan again b/c I hadn't read that much and it has been a while. I just picked up 'The Crossing of the Suez' by Saad El Shazly. He planned and commanded the Egyptian attack in the '73 war.
                        Now that is one book I would like to read!

                        I have read The Road to Ramadan by Mohomad Heikal which is about Egypt between 1967 and the October War.
                        http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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                        • Can we get this thread stickied? Just finished High Noon in the Cold War Kennedy, Khrushcev, and the Cuban Missile Crisis.
                          There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full. -Henry Kissinger

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                          • Originally posted by Wolfe Tone
                            Now that is one book I would like to read!

                            I have read The Road to Ramadan by Mohomad Heikal which is about Egypt between 1967 and the October War.
                            I remember our Bn CO having a copy of it and looking through it, but that was a good 12 years ago. The operation of crossing the canal, and breaching the other side has always fascinated me.
                            "When they get in trouble they send for the sonsabitches." - Admiral King

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                            • Nation-State to be replaced by Market-State

                              Just finished "Ceasar's Legion" - a history of the 10th Legion from its raising in 61 BC through Masada.

                              I've just started Phillips Bobbit's "The Shield of Achilles". It looks to be a heavy but fascinating theory about how the nation-state, as we know it, is dieing out and is being replaced by the market-state,....with all that this will entail for constitutions. Over 800 pages of political theory and recent geo-political history.
                              The Purist

                              Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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                              • About Face - Hackworth
                                Decesion in Normandy - DeEstes

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