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  • Facing Feaful Odds: The Siege of Wake Island, by Gregory Urwin. Without a doubt, the best book I've read dealing with that epic battle in the opening days of the war.
    "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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    • Men at War ~ By: Bill Fawcett



      From Gettysburg to D-Day, history's most momentous battles have been recounted to the world on a grand scale. This book, for the first time ever, looks at man's most epic battles from the point of view of the soldiers on the front lines; providing new insight into the great wars of history. Stories told by the Roman Legionaire, the British Doughboy, and the American Doggie, delve into these battles and battlefronts:
      • Roman Legion
      • Third Crusade under Richard Lionheart
      • Waterloo, French under Napoleon
      • American Civil War: Gettysburg
      • WWI: Americans at Ardennes
      • WWII: Japanese Island Defense
      • WWII: D-Day, Americans at Normandy
      • Marines at Chosin
      "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

      "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

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      • Originally posted by Don Maddox View Post
        The Bear and the Dragon, Tom Clancy.
        Panzer Divisions, "the armoured fist", by K. J. Macksey.

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        • Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland by
          Christopher R. Browning

          101 ploice.jpg


          http://www.amazon.com/Ordinary-Men-R.../dp/0060995068
          • 'If ignorant both of your enemy and yourself, you are certain to be in peril.' Sun Tzu

          Definition of government, "an institution which prevents injustice other than such as it commits itself" by Ibn Khaldun

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          • Dunkirk: Fight to the last man. By Hugh Sebag-Montefiore. Emphasizes the importance of the BEF men who stayed behind to cover the rear of the retreating troops. Gripping so far.
            "In the absence of orders...find something and kill it!" Lt. General Erwin Rommel, 1942

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            • Finished Keith Taylor's The Birth of Vietnam which the author himself says is a bit dated now, but still one of the best books on the subject in English. Currently reading Vietnam: Borderless Histories which is a collection of papers and essays by the top experts in their field, edited by Nhung Tuyet Tran and Anthony Reid. Today's Vietnam experts tend to all speak the language, read Chu Nom (the Chinese character version of written Vietnamese) and Chinese, and often French as well. Much of East Asian history was invented both as a means of glorifying the dynasties in power and promoting loyalty to the State. In essence, they were no different than French schoolchildren's texts introduced under Jules Ferry, which started French history with: "Our ancestors, the Gauls...", except they had the false authority of having been written centuries earlier. Le Van Huu and Ngo Si Lien are two classic examples, writing official court histories that gave later Vietnamese nationalists the basis for their histories. This new generation of Vietnamese scholars is laying bare the problems with such histories. They were, or course, originally written in Chinese, as there was no written Vietnamese, and indeed, perhaps no 'Vietnamese' language as modern Vietnamese know it prior to 1,000 AD. They were later revised in Chu Nom, and even later Quoc Ngu versions appeared. Trung Trac's rebellion against the Chinese is an example (from Keith Taylor's book). Chinese histories do not name her sister, though the assumption is that she had one. Nor do they mention a husband. And they make no mention of any suicide by drowning in a river. Yet these are the stuff of Vietnamese legend and romantic novels. And since there was no written Vietnamese language other than Chinese at the time, we are left to wonder how historians writing centuries, and even a millennium after the facts, could have discovered such. Yet these are the histories that an earlier generation of U.S. scholars such as Frances Fitzgerald, accepted unquestioningly to write their own histories of Vietnam.

              Borderless histories is interesting in that it notes such flaws, but goes on to paint a picture of a modern Vietnam which in one sense, is East Asian, but in another, Southeast Asian, due to the myriad peoples, cultural interactions, and events that made Vietnam the country it is today. In short, the sum of these essays challenge the assumptions of many 60s and 70s Western historians that Vietnam was a country culturally predetermined to become communist. Coincidentially, many also paint pre-colonial Vietnam as a country that possessed and carried out its own imperialist agenda, which should prove no surprise to any Cambodians on this forum, but few will have heard of the Vietnamese drive west to the Irrawaddy river.

              Recommended for anyone seriously interested in Vietnamese history.
              dit: Lirelou

              Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá ǵ!

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              • I m reading Robert A. Heinlein's Starship Troopers for the first time while wrapping up Victory at Any Cost, the biography of Giap. I've also started Tony Judt's Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, which is long enough to provide reading material all month. I really want to begin Moyar's Triumph Forsaken, but I just keep finding something else to read first.
                Last edited by Lucky 6; 04 Jun 11, 22:13.
                ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

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                • Originally posted by Lucky 6 View Post
                  I 'm reading Robert A. Heinlein's Starship Troopers or the first time. I'm wrapping up Victory at Any Cost, the biography of Giap. And I've also started Tony Judt's Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, which is long enough to provide reading material all month. I really want to begin Moyar's Triumph Forsaken, but I just keep finding something else to read first.
                  Starship Trooper is a great introduction to Heinlein. Maybe you've read him before? If not, find more of his work and you'll understand him and that story better. Stranger in a Strange Land is his best book. But I've read almost everything he wrote, and can't remember a bad story.
                  History is the version of past events that people have decided to agree upon. Napoleon Bonaparte
                  _________
                  BoRG
                  __________
                  "I am Arthur, King of the Britons!"

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                  • Originally posted by Torien View Post
                    Starship Trooper is a great introduction to Heinlein. Maybe you've read him before? If not, find more of his work and you'll understand him and that story better. Stranger in a Strange Land is his best book. But I've read almost everything he wrote, and can't remember a bad story.
                    I've never read any of Heinlein's work before, but if the others are similar to this book, I'm interested. I just picked it up from the library today and I can't stop reading it, one of the qualities most important to me. I'll definitely put Stranger in a Strange Land on my to-read list.
                    ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

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                      • Originally posted by Lucky 6 View Post
                        I've never read any of Heinlein's work before, but if the others are similar to this book, I'm interested. I just picked it up from the library today and I can't stop reading it, one of the qualities most important to me. I'll definitely put Stranger in a Strange Land on my to-read list.
                        Actually, Stranger is almost nothing like Starship... if it's the action you like.

                        I was referencing his philosophy and point of view.

                        If it's the action you like, then you need to read Steakley's Armor.


                        Totally a rip-off of Heinlein's work. But better... IMO.
                        History is the version of past events that people have decided to agree upon. Napoleon Bonaparte
                        _________
                        BoRG
                        __________
                        "I am Arthur, King of the Britons!"

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Torien View Post
                          Actually, Stranger is almost nothing like Starship... if it's the action you like.

                          I was referencing his philosophy and point of view.

                          If it's the action you like, then you need to read Steakley's Armor.


                          Totally a rip-off of Heinlein's work. But better... IMO.
                          No, it's definitely the Philosophy aspect. I'm only about a hundred pages in and the only scene so far that had any excitement was the introductory chapter. The whole sevice-state-individual political diatrabe is right up my alley. I'll add Armorr to the list though. Thanks Torien. This is my first venture back into fiction, and I'm realizing how much I've missed it.
                          ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

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                          • Originally posted by Lucky 6 View Post
                            No, it's definitely the Philosophy aspect. I'm only about a hundred pages in and the only scene so far that had any excitement was the introductory chapter. The whole sevice-state-individual political diatrabe is right up my alley. I'll add Armorr to the list though. Thanks Torien. This is my first venture back into fiction, and I'm realizing how much I've missed it.
                            Good, I'm glad you've got the philosophy aspect down. Heinlein would have been totally pissed at the movies based on his work. They totally missed the point.

                            And don't get me wrong about Armor, Steakley totally got the philosophical point and expounded on it. Too bad he never wrote another good book.

                            Whereas Heinlein, wrote way too many... some of his quality was lost in the quantity. But I believe it is still worth reading the entire Lazarus Long series... if you can go the distance.
                            History is the version of past events that people have decided to agree upon. Napoleon Bonaparte
                            _________
                            BoRG
                            __________
                            "I am Arthur, King of the Britons!"

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                            • Originally posted by The Ibis View Post
                              That looks good!
                              Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

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                              • Finally started to tackle Shelby Foote's Civil War. Half way through the 1st volume.

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