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  • I am re-reading The Hobbit before the movie eventually comes out and ruins the book for me.
    Last edited by Double Deuce; 12 Feb 11, 18:57.
    [Official Game Thread] "To the Berezina River" Napoleonic Game

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    • I recently read, "The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America". by Russell Shorto, published 2004

      I found the book quite interesting, but a little disjointed, probably because it is mostly based on some materials that were found in New York, but these materials are by their nature incomplete.

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      • "1434"

        Hello,
        This is the author's (Gavin Menzies) follow-on to his initial
        "1421".

        His thesis is upsetting some professional historians. Are there any comments from those who have read him - either or both books?
        RedDagger18

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        • Hurtgen Forest battle

          Originally posted by lakechampainer View Post
          Just Read "Follow Me and Die: The Destruction of an American Division in World War II" by Cecil B. Currey, published in 1984. About the Huertgen Forest Campaign. Found it to be a good book.


          I bought it at the used book store for $3.98, where people bring in their old books for nothing. I happened to look up Cecil B. Currey to see what his background is, and came up across the book being offered for sale at $48, $30, etc. This confirms to me what I had already figured out, that they make their money by trying to siphon off the books with some value and selling them on-line. This is based upon hearing the workers talk there about not having gone through their books, not letting people go through the old books, the clerk at the register saying something like, 'that's a good find, etc.

          Of course, it's probably not easy to figure out what a book is worth. Probably in this case it was not a huge press run, but the Huertgen Forest campaign has probably drawn interest the last decade or so as we have been bogged down in Southwest Asia.

          The New York Times Book Review today has a bit about JD Salinger who was in the 12th Infantry Regiment in the Forest. May add a dimension to the report here.
          RedDagger18

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          • I finally spent some time this week and finished off Sidney Fay's Origins of the World War, Volume 1: Before Sarajevo. It's a really interesting book that covers the diplomatic maneuvering from the time of the Franco-Prussian war up to the assassination in Sarajevo.

            I will probably start in on volume 2 in the near future, but right now I am reading Alan Clark's Barbarossa and William Lind's Maneuver Warfare Handbook.
            "When they get in trouble they send for the sonsabitches." - Admiral King

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            • This book has changed my perception of WWII in the East.


              http://www.amazon.com/When-Titans-Cl...der_0700608990
              If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks,glory would become the prey of mediocre minds. Napoleon

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              • And then on to The Russian Way of War. Shouldn't be long, almost done. I'm really pleased with this book; I'm definitely ordering a copy from Amazon, a paperback is dirt cheap!
                ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

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                • Post War: A History of Europe Since 1945 by Tony Judt.

                  excerpt from Amazon: World War II may have ended in 1945, but according to historian Tony Judt, the conflict's epilogue lasted for nearly the rest of the century. Calling 1945-1989 "an interim age," Judt examines what happened on each side of the Iron Curtain, with the West nervously inching forward while the East endured the "peace of the prison yard" until the fall of Communism in 1989 signaled their chance to progress. Though he proposes no grand, overarching theory of the postwar period, Judt's massive work covers the broad strokes as well as the fine details of the years 1945 to 2005. No one book (even at nearly a thousand pages) could fully encompass this complex period, but Postwar comes close, and is impressive for its scope, synthesis, clarity, and narrative cohesion.

                  And hey, I love this stuff!

                  I read about aspects for example, of the Hungarian revolution in the 50's that I never knew nor would have really gotten into directly from some primary source on my own.
                  I often think how much easier the world would have been to manage if Herr Hitler and Signor Mussolini had been at Oxford. Lord Halifax

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                  • Originally posted by vyshka View Post
                    I finally spent some time this week and finished off Sidney Fay's Origins of the World War, Volume 1: Before Sarajevo. It's a really interesting book that covers the diplomatic maneuvering from the time of the Franco-Prussian war up to the assassination in Sarajevo.

                    I will probably start in on volume 2 in the near future, but right now I am reading Alan Clark's Barbarossa and William Lind's Maneuver Warfare Handbook.
                    How are you liking Clark's book? I very much enjoyed it and was one of my faster reads as (to me) I kept saying 'one more page'.
                    "War is sorrowful, but there is one thing infinitely more horrible than the worst horrors of war, and that is the feeling that nothing is worth fighting for..."
                    -- Harper's Weekly, December 31, 1864

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                    • I just started "Auschwitz" by Laurence Rees..so far so good..
                      "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."- Sir Winston Churchill, about R.A.F. fighter pilots."
                      "It is well that war is so terrible, else we grow to fond of it." - Robert E. Lee

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                      • wikipedia woes

                        I'm reading wikipedia's long and chaotic military history of World War II article. The section Course of the War reads like Private Ryan on steroids -- a meaningless blurr of explosions. Just "fact noise", and IMO not really "encyclopedic" in content. I wonder what other armchairers make of the article. For a real shambles, see also the wiki article Aftermath of World War II

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                        • `
                          Just finished Cancer Ward by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.


                          Just started The Life and Times of Lucrezia Borgia by Maria Bellonci.
                          " Reality is interpretation according to a scheme which we cannot escape "

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                          • I finally finished The Russian Way of War, and now I'm just beginning Fred Anderson's Crucible of War.
                            ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

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                            • I just started this.

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                              • I'm still chipping away at Crucible of War, and I'm starting Lincoln and the Decision for War by Russell McClintock for a group read.
                                ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

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