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  • Initially disappointed as I was expecting more information on the Persians. What you actually get is a concise background of Persia (Chapter 1), Sparta (Chapter 2) and Athens (Chapter 3). The rest of the book are chapters on the reasons for the Persian invasion of Greece and the events leading up to Marathon, Thermopylae, Salamis and Plataea. Unfortunately it is generally told from a Greek point a view, and given the title of the book I had been looking forward to a Persian perspective. Still it is an absolute bargain, well written and researched, and an excellent overview of the events that transpired.

    5 stars .
    How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
    Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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    • I am early in the book but so far it is very interesting.


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      • The library is taking so long in getting me This Kind of War, I thought I'd brush up on my North American history in the meantime.
        ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

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        • Having just read Persian Fire about the Greeks and Persians, I was about to start this:



          but decided to start this interesting ditty instead . It's quite well known in some circles I believe .

          How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
          Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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          • Just finished "The Warrior Generals: Combat Leadership in the Civil War by Thomas B. Buell".

            An interesting read. He thumped almost every major Union and Confederate general. Yes, that includes General Lee. This has got to be one of the most unflattering account I've read of General Lee yet, which he depicted as almost blood-thirsty in the use and treatment of his own men. And Lee was painted as being almost negligent in things like logistics and intelligence.

            Sherman didn't escape his pen either, and he came across as a bungler. Sherman's March to the Sea didn't receive much credit in Buell's book, and was, in fact, treated as a dangerous and wasteful distraction from the war effort.

            It seems that the only high-ranking general that Buell approved of is General Thomas, which he described in almost invariably positive terms, and made out to be the most 'modern' and professional of the generals on either side. Thomas, in his book, was what we may call a 'complete general'. He's not only good during a battle, but he managed logistics, intelligence, technological innovation, training etc. well off the battlefield, and built up his army into a formidable force. In fact, Buell credited Thomas for providing Sherman with the best of his troops for the March to the Sea.

            Interesting book, but I'm sure it is a controversial one.

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            • Originally posted by Nick the Noodle View Post


              Initially disappointed as I was expecting more information on the Persians. What you actually get is a concise background of Persia (Chapter 1), Sparta (Chapter 2) and Athens (Chapter 3). The rest of the book are chapters on the reasons for the Persian invasion of Greece and the events leading up to Marathon, Thermopylae, Salamis and Plataea. Unfortunately it is generally told from a Greek point a view, and given the title of the book I had been looking forward to a Persian perspective. Still it is an absolute bargain, well written and researched, and an excellent overview of the events that transpired.

              5 stars .
              Perhaps the Greek-centered nature of the book stems from the fact that we have very little by way of source material from the Persians (unless I am mistaken).
              Satis elouquentiae sapientiae parum

              Diadochi Wars GAME:http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...d.php?t=140484

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              • Originally posted by Legatus Augusti View Post
                Perhaps the Greek-centered nature of the book stems from the fact that we have very little by way of source material from the Persians (unless I am mistaken).
                Probably true, but I was hoping something more Persian orientated.

                Still for its price, readability and wealth of info, an incredibly good buy imo. At 6.65 here or $3.08 here for a new copy it is well worth getting imo .
                How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
                Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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                • "A Rumor of war"
                  That was of my first as well.
                  read it way back in 1979.

                  Also back then I read "Fields of Fire"
                  (a novel by senator Jim Webb.)
                  Last edited by oldninjadude; 03 Dec 10, 19:01.

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                  • Another older but a goody "the five fingers" By Gayle Rivers.
                    Last edited by oldninjadude; 03 Dec 10, 18:55.

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                    • I'm currently reading Panzer Commander by Hans von Luck. Very interesting book. Apparently he had for a professor (and became his good friend) Stephen Ambrose. Good insider view.
                      "We have no white flag."

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                      • I finished Unforgiving Minute by Craig Mullaney a couple of days ago. I highly recommend it. Moving on to Sherlock Holmes next.
                        I've always tried to teach you two things 007. First, never let them see you bleed.
                        And the second?
                        Always have an escape plan.
                        -Q

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                        • Currently reading Kurnow's Washington. A Life. A magnificent biography.

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                          • The Library finally got it in after close to three weeks.
                            ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

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                            • To Rule The Waves; "How the British Navy Shaped the Moden World"

                              To Rule The Waves; "How the British Navy Shaped the Moden World" by Edward Herman.

                              In the seventeenth century, the British navy dominance allowed England's trade to boom and prosper. It sustained its colonies, reshaped its politics, and drew England, Scotland, and Ireland together into a single United Kingdom.

                              It was this system that Napoleon had to break in order to make himself absolute master of Europe. And it was the Royal Navy, led by men like Horatio Nelson, that stopped him in his tracks and preserved the liberty of Europe and the rest of the world. That global order would survive the convulsions of the twentieth century and the downfall of the British Empire itself, as Britain passed its essential elements on to its successors, the United States and its navy.

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