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  • Tom Clancy: Rainbow Six
    “Come and take it!"

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    • The 'Canal by Steven Athanas, The Sign of Four by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Fox on the Rhine by Douglas Niles & Michael Dobson, Plum Spookyby Janet Evanovich, and the autobiographies of WWE superstars Stone Cold Steve Austin and HBK Shawn Michaels.

      -Matt
      SGT, 210th MP Battalion, 2nd MP BDE, MSSG

      Fervently PRO-TRUMP, anti-Islam and anti-Steelers!

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      • Napoleon in Victory and Defeat

        by Lt.-Col. T.M. Hunter
        "War is sorrowful, but there is one thing infinitely more horrible than the worst horrors of war, and that is the feeling that nothing is worth fighting for..."
        -- Harper's Weekly, December 31, 1864

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        • So Far from God; The U.S. War With Mexico, 1846-1848 by John S. D. Eisenhower
          ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

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          • Originally posted by Lucky 6 View Post
            So Far from God; The U.S. War With Mexico, 1846-1848 by John S. D. Eisenhower
            What a coindence!! I'm reading the same book.

            I'm also reading Black Powder War by Naomi Novik.
            If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks,glory would become the prey of mediocre minds. Napoleon

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            • To Hell with Custer, & anything I can find on the Eastern front.

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              • Oh, I'm also reading Battle of Surigao Strait by Anthony P. Tully. If you're a WWII fan and like the Pacific War, it is a MUST-READ!

                -Matt
                SGT, 210th MP Battalion, 2nd MP BDE, MSSG

                Fervently PRO-TRUMP, anti-Islam and anti-Steelers!

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                • I'm also just finishing up Zitadelle by Mark Healy.
                  (a new in-depth look at the battle of Kursk)
                  Also I'm waiting on Blood steel & myth by George Nipe.?

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                  • Originally posted by Legate View Post
                    What a coindence!! I'm reading the same book.

                    I'm also reading Black Powder War by Naomi Novik.
                    In light of recent events, I''ve put This Kind of War by T.R. Fehrenbach on hold at the library so I can read it again, you're not are you? Cuz that would be weird.
                    ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

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                    • Still having a good time with Toby Frost's Space Captain Smith. It's the perfect fun read for my work commute and gives me quite a few laughs. The last book I enjoyed near as much was The Book With No Name by Anonymous, a Pulp Fiction/From Dusk Till Dawn grindhouse pulp novel.

                      Space Captain Smith:



                      In the 25nd Century the British Space Empire faces the gathering menace of the evil ant-soldiers of the Ghast Empire hive, hell-bent on galactic domination and the extermination of all humanoid life.

                      Isambard Smith is the square-jawed, courageous and somewhat asinine new commander of the clapped out and battle damaged light freighter John Pym, destined to take on the alien threat because nobody else is available. Together with his bold crew a skull collecting alien lunatic, an android pilot who is actually a fugitive sex toy and a hamster called Gerald he must collect new-age herbalist Rhianna Mitchell from the laid back New Francisco orbiter and bring her back to safety in the Empire.

                      Straightforward enough except the Ghasts want her too. If he is to get back to Blighty alive, Smith must defeat void sharks, a universe-weary android assassin and John Gilead, psychopathic naval officer from the fanatically religious Republic of New Eden before facing his greatest enemy: a ruthless alien warlord with a very large behind...


                      Today arrived the sequels, the reading of which Im very much looking forward to:



                      Tea... a beverage brewed from the fermented dried leaves of the shrub Camellia sinensis and imbibed by all the great civilisations in the galaxy's history; a source of refreshment, stimulation and, above all else, of moral fibre - without which the British Space Empire must surely crumble to leave Earth at the mercy of its enemies.

                      Sixty per cent of the Empire's tea is grown on one world: Urn, principal planet of the Didcot system. If Earth is to keep fighting, the tea must flow. When a crazed cult leader overthrows the government of Urn, Isambard Smith and his vaguely competent crew find themselves saddled with new allies: a legion of tea-obsessed nomads, an overly-civilised alien horde and a commando unit so elite that it only has five members.

                      Only together can they defeat the self-proclaimed God Emperor of Didcot and confront the true power behind the coup: the sinister legions of the Ghast Empire and Smith's old enemy, Commander 462.


                      And ...



                      From the depths of Space a new foe rises to do battle with mankind: the British Space Empire is threatened by the lemming-people of Yull, ruthless enemies who attack without mercy, fear or any concept of self preservation.

                      At the call of their war god, the Yull have turned on the Empire, hell bent on conquest and destruction in their rush towards the cliffs of destiny. When the Yullian army is forced to retreat at the battle of the River Tam, the disgraced Colonel Vock swears revenge on the clan of Suruk the Slayer, Isambard Smith's homicidal alien friend.

                      Now Smith and his crew must defend the Empire and civilise the stuffing out of a horde of bloodthirsty lemming-men - which would be easy were it not for a sinister robotics company, a Ghast general with a fondness for genetic engineering and an ancient brotherhood of Morris Dancers - who may yet hold the key to victory.
                      (notice the Firefly reference in there? )
                      One Strikeout is a tragedy, a million Strikeouts are a statistic.
                      - "Stallin' Joe" Dshugashvili, Manager of the Moscow Red Stars 1922 - 1953

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                      • Current read

                        Hello, Thread
                        Sort of got fed up with John W. Dower's Cultures of War: Pearl Harbor, Hiroshima, 9/11, Iraq. He's clearly a moralizing revisionist historian from MIT especially on the question of dropping the two A Bombs, clearly anti-Bush with all the 20/20 hindsight of the days regarding WMD and Saddam. So am now off to read Simon Winchester's Atlantic, obviously a labor of love, by the man who wrote Krakatoa, and The Map That Changed the World, among others.
                        RedDagger18

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                        • The Rise & Fall of the Japanese Imperial Naval Air Service by Peter Edwards

                          The Soviet Union at War 1941-1945 a collection of papers edited by David Stone

                          Commando Tactics by Stephen Bull

                          Regards
                          "You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life." Churchill

                          "I'm no reactionary.Christ on the Mountain! I'm as idealistic as Hell" Eisenhower

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                          • A. V. Bondarko, Printsipy funktsional'noi grammatiki i voprosy aspektologii [Principles of functional grammar and questions regarding aspectology]


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                            • Anyone ever read any of the Casca novels? I wish they were back in print

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                              • "A Rumor of War" by Philip Caputo. First book I have ever read regarding Vietnam.

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