Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What are you currently reading?

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Have you guys read Clavell's "Whirlwind" on the Iranian revolution? I enjoyed that one also.

    Leave a comment:


  • R. Evans
    replied
    Originally posted by Poor Old Spike View Post
    I haven't read the book but enjoyed the 1980 TV miniseries starring Richard Chamberlain-
    WIKI- "Shōgun is an American television miniseries based on the 1975 novel of the same name by James Clavell, who also was the executive producer of the miniseries. It was first broadcast in the United States on NBC over five nights between September 15 and September 19, 1980. To date, it is the only American television production to be filmed on location entirely in Japan, with additional sound stage filming also taking place in Japan at the Toho studio."

    But I don't know how closely it stuck to the book. Clavell was the producer so presumably it did..
    It stayed pretty close to the book. Obviously some things were lost as they always are when a book is turned into a movie but overall not bad.

    Leave a comment:


  • Poor Old Spike
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    Re-reading Clavell's "Shogun" for the fourth time. For me, it's a great, well-written adventure tale.
    I haven't read the book but enjoyed the 1980 TV miniseries starring Richard Chamberlain-
    WIKI- "Shōgun is an American television miniseries based on the 1975 novel of the same name by James Clavell, who also was the executive producer of the miniseries. It was first broadcast in the United States on NBC over five nights between September 15 and September 19, 1980. To date, it is the only American television production to be filmed on location entirely in Japan, with additional sound stage filming also taking place in Japan at the Toho studio."

    But I don't know how closely it stuck to the book. Clavell was the producer so presumably it did..

    Leave a comment:


  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Jerusalem, a biography

    "Jerusalem, a biography"
    by Sebag Montefiore

    A well researched and page turning history book.

    On the way you immensely brush up on your bibilical knowledge, things you had learned once but that got covered under a lot of dust.
    After that one gets presented with new insights on the Roman Empire from a Jewish angle, I get th eimpression that the Jews were the most unruly subjects of th eEmpire, no way to pacify those zealots;
    followed by the rise of first Christianity and then Islam full with nice little details.
    Currently I am at the Crusaders. I learned about the genuine concerns of the Christians about the access of pilgrims to the holy places. Crusades according to SM were not just schemes thought out by Pope Urban to increase the power of the papacy, but there was a huge religious motif.

    So far I am enjoying every chapter and learning a lot, not revisionist knowledge but a nice array of knowledge attractively presented.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sergio
    replied
    Originally posted by R. Evans View Post


    I've also read that at least 4 times. Love that book.
    Good book - read that several times too.

    Leave a comment:


  • R. Evans
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    Re-reading Clavell's "Shogun for the fourth time. For me, it's a great, well-written adventure tale.


    I've also read that at least 4 times. Love that book.

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Re-reading Clavell's "Shogun" for the fourth time. For me, it's a great, well-written adventure tale.
    Last edited by R.N. Armstrong; 28 Oct 17, 12:06.

    Leave a comment:


  • Greybriar
    replied
    I am currently reading The Red Knight by Miles Cameron.

    Leave a comment:


  • Capt AFB
    replied
    I finished two of former SAS Jack Ryan's novels these past weeks. I picked them up as easy and fun reads:

    Blackout

    and

    Ultimate Weapon

    The story ideas are good, but...

    I have concluded that the author has been lazy or too fast in his fact checking (shooting the MGs of a T-55 from the driver's seat, which incidentally as an automatic-loading main gun!!!), some chapters are too long (bringing nothing to the story) and his surprise endings are not!

    I'm happy I did not pay full price for the books. I'm not sure I'll be reading any other novels by Jack Ryan.

    Leave a comment:


  • CarpeDiem
    replied


    Founding Weimar: Violence and the German Revolution of 1918-1919

    The German Revolution of 1918-1919 was a transformative moment in modern European history. It was both the end of the German Empire and the First World War, as well as the birth of the Weimar Republic, the short-lived democracy that preceded the establishment of the Nazi dictatorship. A time of great political drama, the Revolution saw unprecedented levels of mass mobilisation and political violence, including the 'Spartacist Uprising' of January 1919, the murders of Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg, and the violent suppression of strikes and the Munich Councils' Republic. Drawing upon the historiography of the French Revolution, Founding Weimar is the first study to place crowds and the politics of the streets at the heart of the Revolution's history. Carefully argued and meticulously researched, it will appeal to anyone with an interest in the relationship between violence, revolution, and state formation, as well as in the history of modern Germany.
    Been wanting to get this book for a bit but the price was making me hold off. Finally found a cheaper copy and picked it up. very meaty read so far.

    Review here:
    http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/2070

    Leave a comment:


  • Torien
    replied
    Originally posted by Colonel Sennef View Post
    Intriguing a book with:
    murder (the axe)?
    philosophy: (logos club and functions of language)?
    mystery: (all those 7777's)?

    Just speculation, I could be totally wrong.
    It does, indeed, have all of those ingredients. Excellent distraction.

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    Sticker shock!! Nearly $60 with postage. How can mere mortals collect such books?
    Do a search on bookfinder.com. A number of copies at under 30 including shipping

    Leave a comment:


  • CarpeDiem
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    Sticker shock!! Nearly $60 with postage. How can mere mortals collect such books?
    Found my copy on Abebooks for $28.78 US and free shipping. Checked back and the company seems to have sold out. If you're interested though I'd keep an eye there as cheaper copies may show up.
    Here's the publisher website: http://www.canfora.se/catalog/canfora/
    which may turn out to be cheaper depending on exchange and shipping.

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by CarpeDiem View Post


    Red Machines 1: T-60 Small Tank & Variants

    Very detailed with coverage of development and usage. Looks to become the new standard for a book in English on the type.
    Sticker shock!! Nearly $60 with postage. How can mere mortals collect such books?

    Leave a comment:


  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Originally posted by Torien View Post
    I'm enjoying this.
    Intriguing a book with:
    murder (the axe)?
    philosophy: (logos club and functions of language)?
    mystery: (all those 7777's)?

    Just speculation, I could be totally wrong.

    Leave a comment:

Latest Topics

Collapse

Working...
X