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  • Has anyone actually read all of Machiavelli's The Prince?
    "A foolish man thinks he knows everything if placed in unexpected difficulty; but he knows not what to answer, if to the test he is put."

    --Hávamál

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    • I have, why?
      Wisdom is personal

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      • About to take another run at The Entropy Law and the Economic Process by Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen. The first time through, I'm sure I missed a ton.

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        • Still reading and trying to digest everything in this book.



          Whatever else I think of the sadly missed FM, his continual reference to this book marks him as one of the more insightful minds of this forum .
          How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
          Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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          • good old wilbur smith's RAGE. better be as good as The Power Of the Sword
            Task Force Regenbogen- Support and Paras

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            • FDR's Funeral Train by Robert Klara

              This is a highly detailed, venue by venue, almost minute by minute and hour by hour recounting of Roosevelt's death at Warm Springs, GA, while sitting for a portrait, in the presence of his mistress, and a few other people, (wife Eleanor was up in DC doing other business), followed by initial body preparations and details of the movement by POTUS ( the Presidential train's codename, including the Ferdinand Magellan, the Presidential armored Pullman) from Warm Springs to Union Station, Washington, DC.

              This was followed by a 12 hour layover in DC, including a memorial service in the White House, (with details of movement from Union Station to WH and return), followed by the trip from DC to Hyde Park, NY and burial (haven't gotten to that part yet).

              (For RailFans, there are details of RR operations and specific locomotives used on the Southern RR, and the lineup from DC to the north, including the Pennsylvania RR's famous GG-1. Also, the fact that when the train began to move north, there were three breaks in couplers - the weight was that great due to the armored Pullman - that delayed the start by about an hour.)


              The body was in the last car of the 18 car train in another Pullman, on a bier, American Flag covered, visible to trackside viewers, in both southern and northern legs of the trip.

              President Truman and family joined the train, along with Widow Eleanor Roosevelt, members of both families, and multiple political and military leaders - indeed nearly all of the US wartime leadership - were on the train from DC to Hyde Park. Lots of details about interactions, including the presence of a Soviet spy.
              RedDagger18

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              • Originally posted by Nick the Noodle View Post
                Still reading and trying to digest everything in this book.



                Whatever else I think of the sadly missed FM, his continual reference to this book marks him as one of the more insightful minds of this forum .
                That book is amazing. My advice: in the introduction, Mr. Tooze suggests a selective reading that sidesteps the massive collection of economic data. You might want to try that approach to the book.

                After reading the Wages of Destruction, it prompted me to read Hitler's second book (after Mein Kampf). It is mostly on foreign policy. Unfortunately, it only appears to be available in edited form, by a biased editor.

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                • The Revolution of Nihilism: Warning to the West
                  Hermann Rauschning

                  An expose of the National Socialist revolution written by a former Nazi party member and political refugee, 1939.

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                  • Originally posted by Karri View Post
                    I have, why?
                    A kid in my AP Euro History class said he read it...said it was pretty good. I was just wondering what it was like.
                    "A foolish man thinks he knows everything if placed in unexpected difficulty; but he knows not what to answer, if to the test he is put."

                    --Hávamál

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                    • Originally posted by Super Six 4 View Post
                      A kid in my AP Euro History class said he read it...said it was pretty good. I was just wondering what it was like.
                      I've read it all several times, and have taught it as well. It is definitely a must read for anyone interested in political science, warfare, government, etc. Highly recommend it.
                      Satis elouquentiae sapientiae parum

                      Diadochi Wars GAME:http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...d.php?t=140484

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                      • Originally posted by علامت پیروز View Post
                        That book is amazing. My advice: in the introduction, Mr. Tooze suggests a selective reading that sidesteps the massive collection of economic data. You might want to try that approach to the book.

                        After reading the Wages of Destruction, it prompted me to read Hitler's second book (after Mein Kampf). It is mostly on foreign policy. Unfortunately, it only appears to be available in edited form, by a biased editor.
                        I did that first, but now am reading it fully .
                        How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
                        Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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                        • Originally posted by Legatus Augusti View Post
                          I've read it all several times, and have taught it as well. It is definitely a must read for anyone interested in political science, warfare, government, etc. Highly recommend it.
                          Oh, well then I'll have to put it in my queue...gotta finish Clear and Present Danger, possibly get back to Master and Commander, but somewhere in there it'll find its way.

                          It's almost sad though how the inadvertent Machiavellians in history have inadvertently followed Machiavelli's teachings. Inadvertent, because their actions are the same as what he taught...men like Saddam Hussein-power by all means. Adolf Hitler-ends justify the means(holocaust), and so forth.
                          "A foolish man thinks he knows everything if placed in unexpected difficulty; but he knows not what to answer, if to the test he is put."

                          --Hávamál

                          Comment


                          • oh wow, rage was pretty good. favorite quote?

                            Guy: "What's your posting?"

                            Charismatic semi-hero "A little %$£&-Hole called Sharperville, no-one's ever going to hear about it"

                            i actually laughed
                            Task Force Regenbogen- Support and Paras

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                            • These two books are to be considered required reading if one's really interested in the Luftwaffe! It's full of facts nowhere else related and filled to the brim with experiences from the Luftwaffe's best. Plenty of places where you go "If they listened to him or done this or that, maybe they would have won!". The First and the Last especially relates the trouble the Jet aircraft had in the beginning.
                              Radio Paris Ment...
                              Radio Paris Ment...
                              Radio Paris est Allemand...

                              - Radio London opening intro

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                              • Originally posted by Dashy View Post
                                oh wow, rage was pretty good. favorite quote?

                                Guy: "What's your posting?"

                                Charismatic semi-hero "A little %$£&-Hole called Sharperville, no-one's ever going to hear about it"

                                i actually laughed
                                I love quotes from Black Hawk Down (book) like "Welcome to the world capital of things gone completely to hell!" and Cliff Wollcott's speech about it being "a non smoking Black Hawk helicopter..." lol, I somewhat borrowed that part in my short story I wrote.
                                "A foolish man thinks he knows everything if placed in unexpected difficulty; but he knows not what to answer, if to the test he is put."

                                --Hávamál

                                Comment

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