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  • CarpeDiem
    replied
    The newest Journal of Military History

    Among the articles:
    How Wars End:Victorian Colonial Conflicts
    Mapping the First World War: The Empowering Development of Mapmaking during the First World War in the British Army (some great illustrations with this article)
    Technology, "Machine Age" Warfare and the Military Use of Dogs 1880-1918
    The Yugoslav Partisans' Lost Victories: Operations in Montenegro and Bosnia-Herzegovina 1944-1945
    Rommel Almighty? Italian Assessments of the "Desert Fox" during and After the Second World War (gives another view on Rommel not often considered in the English literature)

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  • 101combatvet
    replied
    Close to Black History month so I started The Bondwoman's Narrative.

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  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Glad to read this.
    You have a way with words as well Rick.

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Into Robert Harris's third book of his Cicero trilogy, he continues to write clean, clear narrative with fresh analogies and metaphors. His trilogy stands with Graves's two books on Claudius. While Graves has a poetic command of the language and understanding of Roman history, Harris has keen insights to the political machinations of Romans. I lose sleep over Harris's compelling storytelling.

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  • VancePolk
    replied
    Just opened "The Wehrmacht's Last Stand- The German Campaigns of 1944-1945" by Robert Citino.

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  • VancePolk
    replied
    Originally posted by warmoviebuff View Post
    Currently listening to (I still read, but I use Audible when I'm walking) "A World Undone" by G.J. Meyer. It is about WWI. I am enjoying it. He covers all the theaters, but not in tedious detail. I especially like his "Background" chapters where he covers topics like Lawrence of Arabia.

    Read this one a few years back, really enjoyed it. The "background" chapters are very interesting.

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  • warmoviebuff
    replied
    Currently listening to (I still read, but I use Audible when I'm walking) "A World Undone" by G.J. Meyer. It is about WWI. I am enjoying it. He covers all the theaters, but not in tedious detail. I especially like his "Background" chapters where he covers topics like Lawrence of Arabia.

    Leave a comment:


  • CarpeDiem
    replied


    Found at a second hand bookstore. Good coverage of Fubuki, Navigatori, Fantasque, Porter and Somers, Tribal, and Narvik classes of destroyers built/designed by Japan, Italy, France, US, UK and Germany between the wars.

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  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    deja-vu

    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    For me reading Lawrence's 'Seven Pillars' was like riding across a desert on a camel--many parts became monotonous, but in Book III, Chapter 33, he explains his epiphany during a delirious illness for his concept to defeat the Turks. Brilliant--that chapter alone was worth the long ride.
    You haven't seen reason to change your old preferences, have you Rick
    Nor have I, fully agree.

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    For me reading Lawrence's 'Seven Pillars' was like riding across a desert on a camel--many parts became monotonous, but in Book III, Chapter 33, he explains his epiphany during a delirious illness for his concept to defeat the Turks. Brilliant--that chapter alone was worth the long ride.

    Leave a comment:


  • Capt AFB
    replied
    Picked up Harris' "Munich" as an audiobook for my road travels.

    Started reading Michael Korda's "Hero, the Life and Legend of Lawrence of Arabia"...A quite interesting read, very well researched and the author brings in the nuances from other authors that wrote bio's about TE Lawrence.

    Figured I wanted to read a bio of Lawrence of Arabia before reading his "Seven Pillars of Wisdom."

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by Colonel Sennef View Post
    Although it stared me in the face I never realised this red thread. You are right this angle is a trend throughout Harris work, another notable example where it is even woven in the title is :'the Ghost', adapted into quite a good movie by Roman Polanski.
    Here Harris employs in a thriller the same technique by concentrating on a PM's (Tony Blair?) ghost writer, which allows Harris to survey the style and methods of the Blair regime leading the UK into the Iraq War.

    I saw Ghost Writer which I enjoyed, and now I am going to get the book, because a movie cannot pickup fully Harris's nuances in characters.

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  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    This nonfictional perfect angle describes the perfect perspective in his fictional works, such as the personal secretary as the storyteller in the Cicero Trilogy or the administrative cardinal in the Vatican involved in the Conclave.
    Although it stared me in the face I never realised this red thread. You are right this angle is a trend throughout Harris work, another notable example where it is even woven in the title is :'the Ghost', adapted into quite a good movie by Roman Polanski.
    Here Harris employs in a thriller the same technique by concentrating on a PM's (Tony Blair?) ghost writer, which allows Harris to survey the style and methods of the Blair regime leading the UK into the Iraq War.

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    After Jeroen's introduction of Robert Harris and reading "The Officer and A Spy" and "Conclave", I am off and running with "Pompeii" and "Enigma" in the ready rack with "Imperium" on order. I like the author's depth of research, character development, storytelling, and command of the language. For these reasons, I will read Munich despite a disappointed ending for Jeroen.
    Finished "Imperium" and now into "Conspirata". Received today Harris's nonfiction, "Good and Faithful Servant: The Unauthorized Biography of Bernard Ingham" from 1990 while he still had a day job of writing a weekly column in the Sunday Times. Blurb on the back observes, "By concentrating on the PM's beloved press secretary, Harris has found the perfect angle from which to survey the style and methods of the Thatcher regime."

    This nonfictional perfect angle describes the perfect perspective in his fictional works, such as the personal secretary as the storyteller in the Cicero Trilogy or the administrative cardinal in the Vatican involved in the Conclave.

    Leave a comment:


  • Canuckster
    replied
    Originally posted by MarkV View Post
    Main difference is AQOTWF is a novel and SOS is a memoir of Junger's experiences.
    You're right, it is a novel but even though it is such I consider it 'memoir-like'. Those type books might be considered fiction but they would be based upon the author's first hand experience. I'd still use them as a source for what life might have been like during those times.

    Two other WW1 "novels' that fit the catagory would be VM Yeates' "Winged Victory" and Elliot Springs "Warbirds: The Diary of an Unknown Aviator".

    In the 1930's some German veterans suggested that Remarque's front line experience was somewhat limited and the closer the book got to the firing trench the less accurate it became, although his descriptions of rear area life were spot on.
    Nazi propaganda to discredit him and the book because of its anti-war sentiment and his less than favourable portrayal of authority.

    from wiki...
    On 10 May 1933, the German government, on the initiative of the Nazi propaganda minister, Joseph Goebbels, banned and publicly burned Remarque's works. He finally left Germany to live at his villa in Switzerland. Remarque's German background as well as his Catholic faith were questioned by the Nazis, who continued to decry his writings, claiming anyone who would change the spelling of his name from the German "Remark" to the French "Remarque" could not be a true German. The Nazis further made the false claim that Remarque had not seen active service during World War I. In 1938, Remarque's German citizenship was revoked and then in 1939, after he and his ex-wife were remarried to prevent her repatriation to Germany, they left Porto Ronco, Switzerland for the United States. They became naturalized citizens of the United States in 1947.

    In 1943, the government arrested his youngest sister, Elfriede Scholz, who had stayed behind in Germany with her husband and two children. After a trial in the "Volksgerichtshof" (Hitler's extra-constitutional "People's Court"), she was found guilty of "undermining morale" for stating that she considered the war lost. Court President Roland Freisler declared, "Ihr Bruder ist uns leider entwischt—Sie aber werden uns nicht entwischen" ("Your brother is unfortunately beyond our reach—you, however, will not escape us"). Scholz was beheaded on 16 December 1943, and the cost of her prosecution, imprisonment and execution—495.80 Reichsmark—was billed to her sister Erna.


    I'm surprised to see that there has been some difficulty getting a copy. Mine was acquired some years ago with no problem. SOS has been around for some time I believe that Sassoon gave it a good review before WW2. AQOTWF got pushed more in Germany at least because Remarque was prepared to allow himself to be photoed with Hitler (and the book) which made useful publicity for both of them and Junger was not and would have nothing to do with Hitler which reportedly peed off Adolf somewhat
    Junger may not have joined with the Nazis but after reading the following from wiki I can see why they may have considered him an kindred spirit...

    He criticized the fragile and unstable democracy of the Weimar Republic, stating that he "hated democracy like the plague." More explicitly than in Storm of Steel, he portrayed war as a mystical experience that revealed the nature of existence. According to Jünger, the essence of the modern was found in total mobilisation for military effectiveness, which tested the capacity of the human senses. In 1932, he published The Worker (German title: Der Arbeiter), which called for the creation of an activist society run by warrior-worker-scholars. In the essay On Pain, written and published in 1934, Jünger rejects the liberal values of liberty, security, ease, and comfort, and seeks instead the measure of man in the capacity to withstand pain and sacrifice. Around this time his writing included the aphorism "What doesn't kill me makes me stronger; and what kills me makes me incredibly strong.

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