Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What are you currently reading?

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hida Akechi
    replied
    Just picked up the leather cover, Barnes and Noble exclusive edition of Dune to read while I'm on vacation next week. Looking forward to it, I haven't read it since I was in elementary school.

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    I'll have to get Sears' Lincoln on my list.

    Leave a comment:


  • R. Evans
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    If you have read T. Harry Williams' "Lincoln and His Generals", I would be interested in your comparison.
    I haven't. I'll have to get on my Amazon wishlist.

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
    About 100 pages in and as usual with Sears' work, it's excellent.

    If you have read T. Harry Williams' "Lincoln and His Generals", I would be interested in your comparison.

    Leave a comment:


  • R. Evans
    replied
    About 100 pages in and as usual with Sears' work, it's excellent.

    Leave a comment:


  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    I enjoy linking history with literature and good movie arts.
    You're definitely not alone here

    Leave a comment:


  • CarpeDiem
    replied


    Kampfgruppe Walther and Panzerbrigade 107
    Contains some sample pages.
    Extremely detailed and adds to the historical record and also looks to correct some older histories like Kershaw's It Never Snows in September

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Just finished Robert Harris's The Fatherland. Good mystery storyline within an alternative history situation. Very impressive for a first novel. It complements the movie Conspiracy about the Wansee Conference with Branagh as Heydrich and Tucci as Eichmann, and both the book and movie reinforce Hannah Ardent's observation from the Eichmann trial in Jerusalem on the 'banality of evil'.

    I enjoy linking history with literature and good movie arts.
    Last edited by R.N. Armstrong; 04 Feb 18, 12:21.

    Leave a comment:


  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Started

    Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare

    by Giles Milton.

    Details are well researched and narrated. This goes a bit at the expense of his objectivity as the author creates the impression that his subject can be safely considered the most important part of the British war effort
    Still chapters are entertaining and informative

    Last edited by Colonel Sennef; 05 Feb 18, 14:06.

    Leave a comment:


  • warmoviebuff
    replied
    Just finished "Men of War" by Alexander Rose. It is like the American version of Keegan's "Face of Battle". Rose covers Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima. Excellent read.

    Leave a comment:


  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Always glad to hear officers reading and using military history. I found reading military history that rhymed with my situations gave me a wider repertoire of options for decisions and courses of action.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tsar
    replied
    The Murrow boys
    Pioneers on the front lines of broadcast journalism.

    Leave a comment:


  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
    However, I ordered and received via Amazon 27 Articles written by Lawrence, as guidance to British officers dealing with Arabs. Starting to read it this weekend.
    Working in the region I find "27 Articles" still relevant

    Leave a comment:


  • Capt AFB
    replied
    Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
    Picked up Harris' "Munich" as an audiobook for my road travels.

    Started reading Michael Korda's "Hero, the Life and Legend of Lawrence of Arabia"...A quite interesting read, very well researched and the author brings in the nuances from other authors that wrote bio's about TE Lawrence.

    Figured I wanted to read a bio of Lawrence of Arabia before reading his "Seven Pillars of Wisdom."
    Well I finished reading Korda's bio on Lawrence of Arabia. I highly recommend the 700-page book to anyone interested about TE Lawrence. Quite well researched.

    I was aware that he join the RAF after WW1 to find refuge from the public spotlight. What I did not know is that he first joined as Pte Ross before being invited out...Later joined the Royal Tank Corps as Pte Shaw before transferring to the RAF again, where he became a sea-rescue specialist. After completing his service with the RAF (Feb 1935) he would die several months later in a tragic motorcycle accident (May 1935.)

    The book has a few dry spots, as the author speaks in great length about the self-imposed challenges by Lawrence as he wrote and continually edited the Seven Pillars of Wisdom...Not only what he wrote, but also typeset, format, cover pages, etc ... To a point that I am not interested in reading Seven Pillars anymore!

    However, I ordered and received via Amazon 27 Articles written by Lawrence, as guidance to British officers dealing with Arabs. Starting to read it this weekend.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    German Armored Trains 1904 - 1945.

    Leave a comment:

Latest Topics

Collapse

Working...
X